Tagged: Yemen Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:49 am on June 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Yemen   

    Yemen: A new Mideast flash point? 

    Saudi army tanks are seen deployed near the Saudi-Yemeni border,
    Saudi army tanks are seen deployed near the Saudi-Yemeni border,

    By Heshmat Alavi


    American Thinker, June 14,  2017
     – With the new U.S. administration blueprinting its Iran policy after escalating developments in Syria and the recent attacks in Tehran, one major battleground between the two arch-rivals is set to be Yemen.  Sitting at the opening of a major waterway through which a significant amount of the world’s seabound oil flows, this country of 27 million has been war-torn and desperately grappling with a famine currently risking the lives of 7 million people.
    All the while, Iran and its offspring terror organization, the Lebanese Hezb’allah, are escalating their meddling in a war that has already left more than 10,000 killed and literally leveled the country’s already poor infrastructure.
    And while the United Nations has issued pleas for support to boost the efforts of humanitarian aid organizations, signs show that Iran and its Houthi proxies are ignoring these calls.  The larger picture of the Middle East power struggle is casting a long shadow over this entire nation.  It is, however, worth noting that the Saudi-led coalition welcomed a U.N. proposal to hand the port city of Hodeidah, currently the country’s lifeline, to a neutral third party to supervise the urgent flow of humanitarian aid into Yemen.
    The Iran-backed Ansar Allah militia group, aka the Houthis, will most likely turn down the proposals.  Such a handover would render the loss of their last remaining port in Yemen, choking the flow of Iran-supplied arms and ammunition.  It is a known fact that Iran’s involvement in Yemen is in line with its broader strategy of encircling the entire Arabian peninsula and upping pressure on its regional arch-rival, Saudi Arabia.
    Iran seeks the destabilization of the Gulf States and to ultimately obtain the capability of replacing these governments with rulers loyal to the Islamic Republic’s doctrine.  Iraq is a vivid example of how Iran usurped the opportunity of the 2003 invasion to cast its shadow over this nation, especially during the eight years of former prime minister Nouri al-Maliki and eight years of Obama’s Chamberlain-style appeasement.
    This is the very philosophy behind establishing and procuring terror cells with the objective of purging government officials and staging attacks targeting the infrastructure of various states, including Bahrain, Kuwait, and the UAE.  Bahrain, particularly, in March busted a terrorist cell linked to Hezb’allah and Iran’s Revolutionary Guards (IRGC).
    It is a known fact that the IRGC and Hezb’allah are present in Yemen, with their troops and foot soldiers fighting alongside Houthis, parallel to providing much needed training and advice to these forces.
    The number of Hezb’allah fighters being captured is on the rise, with such statistics in the first three months of 2017 matching the entire course of 2016.  The death toll of Hezb’allah and IRGC forces also escalated in the first quarter of 2017.
    More Iranian equipment across scattered front lines in Yemen is being discovered by advancing Yemeni and Saudi forces.  Further concerning is the fact that Iranian weapons convoys and shipments, consisting of drones and high-tech missiles, have been intercepted on the Yemen-Oman border.
    Maritime traffic snaking the Yemeni coast lengthwise has experienced a dangerous rise in attacks staged by the Iranian IRGC and Hezb’allah.  Advisers to these two sources are busily training Houthis how to develop sophisticated drone boats packed with explosives and how to lay mines in Yemen’s Red and Arabian Sea waters.
    Recent reports in the media shed light on the Houthis launching their first such attack, targeting an oil tanker in the southern Bab el-Mandeb Strait.  Assailants of unknown identity fired rocket-propelled grenades – a favorite tactic of insurgents – at the 70,362-ton M.T. Muskie, sailing under the Marshall Islands flag, using the strategic waterway heading into the Red Sea entrance, according to Reuters.
    Involvement in the attack was denied by the Houthis, despite a history of evidence showing these Iran-supplemented proxies staging attacks on various navy vessels using the narrow water passage.  The Houthis are also known to have direct interest in disturbing the flow of Bab el-Mandeb’s maritime traffic to provide Tehran unprecedented influence over the Red Sea and up north to the Suez Canal .
    As tensions continue to escalate in this vital corner of the globe, it becomes imperative for the international community, and especially U.S. allies in the region, to take urgent action against Iran’s meddling, with the aim of curbing its dangerous influence and establishing peace and tranquility in the Middle East.

    Heshmat Alavi is a political and rights activist.  His writing focuses on Iran, including human rights violations, social crackdown, the regime’s support for terrorism and meddling in foreign countries, and the controversial nuclear program.  He tweets at @HeshmatAlavi and blogs at IranCommentary.

    Source:  Yemen: A new Mideast flash point?

    Advertisements
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:00 pm on June 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Yemen   

    Yemen: A new Mideast flash point? 

    Liked by 1 person

    Iran Commentary

    With the new U.S. administration blueprinting its Iran policy after escalating developments in Syria and the recent attacks in Tehran, one major battleground between the two arch-rivals is set to be Yemen.  Sitting at the opening of a major waterway through which a significant amount of the world’s seabound oil flows, this country of 27 million has been war-torn and desperately grappling with a famine currently risking the lives of 7 million people.

    All the while, Iran and its offspring terror organization, the Lebanese Hezb’allah, are escalating their meddling in a war that has already left more than 10,000 killed and literally leveled the country’s already poor infrastructure.

    And while the United Nations has issued pleas for support to boost the efforts of humanitarian aid organizations, signs show that Iran and its Houthi proxies are ignoring these calls.  The larger picture of the Middle East power struggle is casting a…

    View original post 578 more words

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:43 pm on May 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , Yemen   

    Middle East proxies’ ration of Iranian economy 

     by Mohammad Amin 

    There is a fundamental question about Iran’s economic status quo: More than one year after the lifting of international sanctions, why is the economy riddled with crises and even deteriorated in various regards?

    In response to this question, Iranian affairs analysts cite various elements, including poor infrastructure, widespread corruption, political instability, numerous risks facing investments, and unfounded laws. But there are also factors created by the foreign policy choices of Iran’s theocratic government.

    In this regard, one must undoubtedly take into consideration the heavy cost of Iran supporting terrorist proxy groups scattered across the Middle East. Iran’s fiscal budget bill (from March 2017 to March 2018) has allocated over 859 trillion rials (equal to $24.5 billion) for military and security affairs. This is 23 percent of the country’s general budget.

    However, there is no mention of any proxy groups in the numbers and charts.

    Iran Hezbollah

    The main percentage of these groups’ costs are paid through the revenues of the “Setad Ejraiye Farmane Hazrate Emam” – Headquarters for Executing the Order of the Imam, the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) Cooperative, the Imam Khomeini Relief Foundation, the IRGC Basij Cooperative and a percentage of the government’s budget.

    Although no official information has been published on these proxy groups’ expenses, a list of their names is proof itself of the heavy burden they place on Iran’s economy.

    IRAQ

    • Badr Organization
    • Al-Nojaba Movement
    • Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq
    • Kata’ib Hezbollah
    • Kata’ib Imam al-Ali
    • Sarya Al Khorasani
    • Kata’ib Seyed al-Shohada
    • Liwa Abu Fadl
    • Liwa’a Zulfiqar
    • Harakat al-Abdal

    The list also includes a number of smaller groups. The number of such Iran-linked Shiite groups in Iraq are in the dozens, and nearly all are members of the Popular Mobilization (PMF), or what is commonly known as the Hashd al-Shaabi.

    hashd.jpg

    YEMEN

    The Ansarollah, or the Houthis, were established in 1997 under orders from Iran based on the Lebanese Hezbollah example and structure.

    LEBANON

    The Lebanese Hezbollah has a long and well-known history of being founded by Iran and advancing Tehran’s policy in the region, while conducting terrorist attacks across the globe.

    BAHRAIN

    • Tayyar al-Amal al-Esmali
    • February 14th Coalition, consisting also of a number of other groups

    THE GULF

    The Gulf Hezbollah was established in 1984 under the supervision of IRGC Brigadier General Mohammad Mostafa Najjar (Iran’s former defense and interior minister from 2005 to 2013). Its range of activities covered countries south of Iran and the Persian Gulf.

    ????? ????? ??????? ?????? ???? ?????? ??????

    PALESTINE

    • Islamic Jihad Movement
    • Saberin Movement, consisting of Shiite Palestinians and established in April 2014 with a logo very similar to that of the IRGC.

    EGYPT

    The Islamic Revolutionary Guards of Egypt was established in December 2012.

    “If we ever need arms or money for our struggle, we will follow Hassan Nasrallah’s example in Lebanon,” said Mohamed al-Khedhri, the group’s secretary general.

    KUWAIT

    The Kuwait Hezbollah

    Kuwait authorities last year deported 11 Lebanese and three Iraqi nationals for links with Hezbollah, according to the Gulf Times.

    AFGHANISTAN

    The Fatemioun Brigade is one of the most important entities providing new Afghan recruits for the IRGC’s war in Syria.

    13940718000412_PhotoI

    PAKISTAN

    The Zeinabioun Brigade, in addition to its fundamentalist activities in Pakistan, dispatches a significant number of its members to Syria in its support for IRGC combat missions.

    Cost Estimate

    Iran deliberately provides no report on the abovementioned groups’ expenses as part of its economy. Estimates provided by Western sources reflect only a small percentage of these expenses. For example, a July 2015 Congressional Research Service report estimates the expenses of these groups, and Iran’s financial support for the Bashar Assad regime, at $3.6 to $16 billion, of which $300 million is allocated to proxy militia groups. However, their expenses cannot be so low when the afore-mentioned groups are involved in a series of widespread foreign wars on Iran’s behalf.

    1. About Iraq, the Iranian regime pays members of its proxy group through monthly salaries, revealed a decade ago by the Iranian opposition National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI). This movement presented a list of 31,690 Iraqi elements of the IRGC, all receiving salaries from Iran.
    2. Iran is providing the financial and arms resources for over 80,000 PMF members in Iraq, according to an October 2016 Agence France Presse wire.
    3. Providing the funds for IRGC-affiliated militias in Iraq takes place through technical and construction support or charities.

    Rostam Ghasemi

    “To this day Iran has provided $5bn in technical and engineering support to Iraq,” said Rostam Ghasemi, former head of the IRGC’s “Khatam al-Anbia” base and once Iran’s minister of oil.

    Entities, such as the Iran-Iraq Comprehensive Cooperation Department and the Iran-Iraq Economic Development Department established subsequently from 2005 onward, are facilitating Tehran’s efforts to fund the proxy groups.

    1. In Yemen, Iran is providing for all the Houthis’ expenses and arms. The Houthi missile unit now enjoys ballistic missiles and weapons-carrying drones, all provided by Iran.
    2. Four Iranian vessels carrying weapons for Yemen were confiscated in the span of the last 18 months, according to Vice Admiral Kevin M. Donegan, Commander of the U.S. Naval Central Command in his remarks with reporters. (AFP, 27 October 2016)

    Five arms consignments sent by Iran have been confiscated by Australian, French and American naval forces, according to a report presented by special experts of a U.N. working group (established based on UN Security Council Resolution 2140). Two commercial ships carrying Iranian weapons were confiscated by Saudi Arabian forces. (Asharq al-Awsat, 31 January 2017)

    Hassan Nasrollah Khamenei

    1. The Lebanese Hezbollah, according to its current secretary-general Hassan Nasrallah, receives all its funds and arms from Iran.

    “The Islamic government in Iran has relieved us of any need of money in the world,” Nasrallah said in a public speech delivered in 2012. (Al-Alam, Iran’s official Arab-language TV station, 7 February 2012)

    1. On 8 October 2013, Le Figaro cited Lebanese sources estimating Iran has provided Hezbollah $30 billion dollars over the past 30 years.

    An analysis of various report delivers the following conclusion:

    Iran’s financial support for various proxy groups
    Groups Annual financial support estimate
    Dozens of Shiite groups in Iraq $1.5 -$3 billion
    Houthis in Yemen $1.5 -$2.5 billion
    Lebanese Hezbollah $1 -$1.5 billion
    Afghan Fatemioun $150 million
    Pakistani Zeinabioun $100 million
    Militias spread in Gulf countries $300 -$500 million
    IRGC militias in other countries $100 -$300 million
    TOTAL $4.65 -$7.8 billion

    This short study provides a perspective into the effort the Iranian regime expends to wreak havoc and advocate Islamic fundamentalism across the Middle East through a wide spectrum of proxy groups. And the Iranian people are feeling the damage directly, as such funds, parallel to the billions poured by the mullahs into their nuclear program, ballistic missile ambitions, and domestic crackdown machine, have left the majority of the country living in deep poverty.

    If the West seeks to support the Iranian people, the first necessary measure is to designate the IRGC as a terrorist organization to severely limit Iran’s malignant activities.

    Ehsan AminolRoaya 2Mohammad Amin (@EconomieIran) is a senior research fellow for the Paris-based Fondation d’Etudes pour le Moyen-Orient (FEMO) or Foundation for the Study of the Middle East. He has written several books and essays about the ruling theocracy, the transformation of Iran’s political economy under the presidency of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism in the Middle East.

    Feature Foto: Credit by Safin Hamed 

    Source: Middle East proxies’ ration of Iranian economy

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:17 pm on March 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , Yemen   

    ANALYSIS: Here’s how to blueprint the most effective Iran policy 

    Here_s how to blueprint the most effective Iran policy

    Iran has been continuing its series of blatant measures in defiance of norms accepted as standard by the international community, all as the Trump administration continues to weigh on blacklisting the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC). Iran has gone as far as pledging to launch “roaring missiles” in response to threats. To this day, several ballistic missile launches – capable of delivering nuclear payloads – have been Tehran’s report card.

    Reports also show Iran increasing its support of the Houthis in Yemen by providing “Kamikazi” drones, water and airborne, to threaten shipping lines in Bab el-Mandeb and most certainly Saudi Navy ships, as weapons analysts confirmed forces aligned with former Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh are also using these weapons to target missile-defense systems used by Saudi-led coalition units.

    And after harassing US warships in the Strait of Hormuz, Iran has gone as far as not only denying the entire ordeal, but also holding Washington responsible for any future face-offs in a shipping route key for international oil trade.

    Iran’s objective

    Fully aware of its weak and outdated military capabilities, the mullahs are attempting to both keep a straight face at home and obtain as much leverage as possible in regards to the new White House completely overhauling its predecessor’s Iran engagement approach.

    Trump has shown his muscular perspective through an array of thorny statements followed by new sanctions, welcomed by the Iranian opposition. However, if Washington is truly serious about returning peace and security to the Middle East, targeting the destabilizing epicenter is crucial.

    The Trump White House is continuously pledging more severe US action if the mullahs see their interests in continuing to breach international norms by taking on prohibited missile launches.

    A number of Iranian first official dismissed the tough talk by President Trump over the deal that initially aimed to curb Iran’s nuclear program as nothing but empty rhetoric usually resorted to on the campaign trail. However, through appointing Gen. James Mattis as his defense secretary and with a second round of sanctions against Iran, many voices are being silenced.

    A bad deal

    With the nuclear deal being described as “weak and ineffective” by President Trump, his administration has moved forward to addressing another very important matter in the US-Iran relationship. As Tehran was witnessing its money and influence going down the drain, the nuclear deal provided the regime an escape route to evade a military conflict.

    And while the accord was claimed to focus on weakening the mullahs’ regime and boosting the Iranian people’s status, the concessions provided by the Obama administration delivered the exact life support the regime needed both economically and symbolically.

    As sanctions were rolled back, Iran’s practice of resorting to destabilizing measures across the region was provided a waterfall of financial support to sidestep a military conflict. This also greenlighted Iran to relaunch its illicit activity, only to be slapped warnings and sanctions in the past month or so by a new White House.

    Despite senior Iranian officials being very active in voicing dissent, the consequences of America and allies regaining a very serious position on Iran and closing the nuclear deal faucet is crystal clear.

    Targeting the roots

    Trump has also taken the initiative of challenging Iran’s extended offensive with proxy groups throughout the region, threatening America’s interests and allies. After eight years of the Obama administration adopting a policy of nearly abandoning the Middle East at Iran’s will, the Trump administration has shown signs in complete contrast.

    Iran’s support for the Assad regime in Syria, sectarian Shiite militias in Iraq, the Houthis in Yemen and the Lebanese Hezbollah are the leverages Tehran must be deprived of.

    Iran also comprehends quite well its firepower is no match for US arsenal, and resorting to mercenaries to obtain a charade of regional dominance. The White House has acknowledged the fluid and dynamic nature of the Middle East, and pinpointing Iran’s support for the Houthis as a group affronting the Saudi’s southern border.

    This is a significant change of attitude as the Obama administration never acknowledged such a relation. This provided Iran a green light to expand its impact and direct regional proxy groups to spread terrorism and havoc throughout the Middle East. All eyes are now on the Trump administration, seeking a major strategy against Iran’s network of proxies. This can most specifically be achieved by severing all flows of funds and arms from the source: the IRGC.

    Riyadh has also welcomed the new White House’s more serious approach regarding the Middle East, and backing America’s allies who are currently struggling to prevent transnational terrorists, including ISIS, and specifically focusing efforts to end Iran’s meddling in countries such as Yemen.

    Swift and punitive response

    Iran poses a major concern for international security, demonstrated in the Trump administration condemning the country’s support for terrorism on a broad scale. Funding and arming the Lebanese Hezbollah, knee-deep in the Syria crisis with arms and boots transferring, Shiite proxies on a rampage against Sunni minorities in Iraq in the name of fighting ISIS, and as mentioned above, the Houthis in Yemen.

    True, the Trump administration has many cards to play against the regime in Tehran. Iran’s crusades in these four Arab countries can be brought to an end through one single measure. A swift and punitive response from the White House can be found in the US and all international correspondents designating Iran’s IRGC as a foreign terrorist organization, ending the naïve policy of appeasement vis-à-vis Iran.

    Through such measures the Trump administration will have correctly acknowledged the actual source of turmoil in the Middle East. It is high time for the West, and especially the US, to adopt a smart strategy targeting Iran’s key pillars in its network of international terrorism and draining the swamp of Tehran’s overreach across the region.

    Originally published in Al Arabiya English

    Heshmat Alavi is a political and rights activist. His writing focuses on Iran, ranging from human rights violations, social crackdown, the regime’s support for terrorism and meddling in foreign countries, and the controversial nuclear program. He tweets at @HeshmatAlavi & blogs at IranCommentary.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:40 pm on March 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , Yemen   

    The Revolutionary Guards pursue Iran’s warmongering and export of terrorism 

    most-wanted-terrorist-irgc

    The Revolutionary Guards pursue Iran’s warmongering and export of terrorism


    Iran’s Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) should be designated as a foreign terrorist organization, making it clear this is a foreign-based entity threatening the interests of not only the United States but all countries, especially its Middle East neighbors. Citizens of numerous regional states and widespread national security interests of Iran’s neighboring governments are threatened as the IRGC is “involved in terrorism or terrorism engagement,” or retains the “ability and intention to engage in terrorism or launch terrorist activities.” If there is one entity that unquestionably fits such a legal criteria, it is none other than Iran’s IRGC.

    Khamenei had officially dispatched the IRGC to Syria to protect the Assad regime following the spark of unrest and revolution in 2011.

    Quds Force offices in Tehran and Iran’s eastern areas resort to threatening and bribing Afghan nationals in Iran to register to fight in Syria. There are also many cases where Afghan prisoners, or death row inmates, are released on the condition of being dispatched to Syria.

    Under orders issued by the Quds Force, Iraqi militias such as the al-Nojba, the Badr Organization, Sarayaye Khorasani, Asaeb Ahl al-Haq and Kataeb Hezbollah have sent forces to Syria. They have first gone from Iraq to the southwest Iranian city of Abadan, and from there to Syria through a number of Mahan Air charter planes.
    Khamenei had officially dispatched the IRGC to Syria to protect the Assad regime following the spark of unrest and revolution in 2011.

    Quds Force offices in Tehran and Iran’s eastern areas resort to threatening and bribing Afghan nationals in Iran to register to fight in Syria. There are also many cases where Afghan prisoners, or death row inmates, are released on the condition of being dispatched to Syria.
    Under orders issued by the Quds Force, Iraqi militias such as the al-Nojba, the Badr Organization, Sarayaye Khorasani, Asaeb Ahl al-Haq and Kataeb Hezbollah have sent forces to Syria. They have first gone from Iraq to the southwest Iranian city of Abadan, and from there to Syria through a number of Mahan Air charter planes.
    The result of Iran’s meddling in Syria:
    Over half a million people dead
    More than 12 million displaced
    More than 15,000 children dead
    More than 600,000 children orphaned
    More than 1,500 medical aid personnel killed
    Four cities completely levelled
    Aleppo
    Hama
    Homs
    Dera
    The IRGC must be designated as terrorists.

    Source: The Revolutionary Guards pursue Iran’s warmongering and export of terrorism

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:12 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Yemen   

    Iranian Opposition Obtains Secret Dossier That Reveals Iran’s Overall Plan With Middle East 

    Inside 'The Glasshouse'.jpg

    Inside ‘the Glasshouse’ Iran ‘is running covert war in Syria costing BILLIONS from top secret spymaster HQ near Damascus airport’

     

     

    by Yochanan Visser

    Iran reportedly is running a huge secret operations center near Damascus International Airport.

    Western Journalism, Sept. 2, 2016 – Members of the Iranian opposition say a leaked intelligence dossier reveals the frighteningly high level of involvement of Iran in the Syrian war.
    The National Council of Resistance of Iran told the Mail Online in Great Britain that Iran is running a huge five-floor secret operations headquarters dubbed “the Glasshouse” near Damascus International Airport, from where it coordinates the war effort against rebel groups on behalf of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad.
    The complex has anti-blast walls and is guarded by heavily armed Iranian soldiers. The NCRI says that roughly 1,000 military personnel are working in the 180-room building. Departments in the command center include a counterintelligence unit, a logistics and propaganda unit and the Iranian intelligence services.

    “The building is also said to contain prayer rooms, a 20-bed private clinic for wounded senior officers, and facilities for holding millions of dollars in cash, which are reportedly kept in the basement,” the Mail Online reported.
    Over the past five years Iran hast spent billions of dollars to shore up the regime of al-Assad. The NCRI claims that Iran delivered hardware and other forms of support to the al-Assad regime that could be worth a staggering $100 billion.
    “The Iranian HQ, which plays a pivotal role in supporting Assad’s regime alongside Russia, contains intelligence and counterintelligence operations, and has vaults packed with millions of dollars in cash flown in from Tehran,” reported the Mail Online.
    The new information gives an entirely different picture about Iran’s involvement in the Syrian war than was known thus far and sheds more light on Tehran’s overall plan with the Middle East.

    1.jpg

    Iran’s secret night flights to arm Syria’s Assad revealed  The National

     

    For example, until now it was assumed that there were only 16,000 foreign Shiite fighters in Syria who are assisting al-Assad’s army. The NCRI puts the number at 60,000 and says that al-Assad’s standing army now consists of only 50,000 soldiers.
    Iran has approximately 16,000 troops in Syria and they are commanding “45,000 Shiite mercenaries from Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Lebanon as well as Palestinians and Baluchis, a minority group from Afghanistan,” according to the Daily Mail.
    The number of 60,000 foreign Shiite fighters in Syria doesn’t include the Hezbollah members who are fighting on al-Assad’s behalf, according to the NCRI, which put their number at 10,000.
    If true, this means the majority of the fighters at al-Assad’s disposal are now Shiites and that Iran and not Assad is running what is left of Syria.
    The information about the Iranian command center at Damascus Airport is considered to be credible by Iran experts.
    The Daily Mail quoted Kamal Alam, a research analyst at the Royal United Services Institute, who said that the leaked intelligence was “entirely plausible.”
    “I go quite regularly to Syria and visit the battlefields, and I’ve seen how the Iranians try to keep their operations as secret as possible,” he told the English tabloid.
    “Their troops tend to speak Arabic rather than Farsi in public, and generally don’t wear Iranian uniforms. This makes it very hard for observers to know how many are in the country,” the analyst added.

     

    The NCRI claims that it received a dossier with the secret information from dissident members of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps.
    The revelation about the huge Iranian command center in Syria comes a few days after Western Journalism reported that Iran is also setting up camp in areas that were retaken from the Islamic State in Iraq.
    The IRGC has reportedly built six military bases in the area between Mosul and Kirkuk, the oil-rich city in the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq.
    What Iran is doing in Iraq and Syria is, in fact, a copy of the modus operandi in Lebanon, where the IRGC established Hezbollah right after the first Lebanon War in 1982.
    In Lebanon too, Iran is operating a huge command center that directs Hezbollah’s “resistance” against Israel.
    The Israeli Iran expert Ronen Bergman revealed this in his book The Secret War with Iran.
    He wrote that the command center in Beirut is located in the Iranian embassy, which is the largest in the Lebanese capital, and includes a department that monitors the Israeli media and a unit that passes on intelligence on the activities of the Israeli army to Hezbollah.
    The overall Iranian plan is to create a corridor from the Iranian border via Iraq and eastern and southern Syria to the Israeli border on the Golan Heights. The revelation by the NCRI fits into this picture and shows that Iran intends to control large swathes of Syrian territory with or without al-Assad and is preparing for a future confrontation with Israel.

     

    Source: Iranian Opposition Obtains Secret Dossier That Reveals Iran’s Overall Plan With Middle East

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: