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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:19 am on 16 Oct 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Women,   

    Humans Without Rights 

    The World Day Rural Women-Oct. 2018

    I read a report on the situation of rural women in Iran, which was prepared by the Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran. The report is published on the occasion of the International Rural Women’s Day. In this comprehensive report, which I put the PDF link at the end of the article for full study, the main violations of the rural women’ rights in Iran has been investigated. I draw your attention to the summary of this comprehensive report.

    A Study of the Situation of Rural Women in Iran From the Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran.

    In Iran, the word “village” brings to mind a place without water and electricity, with sheds made of mud and adobe. So, shortages and deficiencies are inherent to the word village.

    The burden of such intolerable life, of course, is carried by women and girls who have to respond to the needs of their families despite the fact that their own special needs are never responded to.

    The life of Iran’s rural women does not comply with any humane, let alone, international standards. Rural women in Iran are “forgotten” human beings who are deprived of the most basic requirements of a decent life.

    The general director of Women and Family Affairs in the Central Province’s Governorate, Zahra Faraji, described the situation of rural women as “disorganized.” She acknowledged that although rural women do not enjoy any resources or opportunities, “The issue of occupation of rural women and girls has not been defined in any of the government plans and programs.”

    Albeit tragic, the statement does not reflect the whole truth.

    On the one hand, there is no transparency on the situation of rural women in Iran.

    On the other hand, the situation of Iranian women in general is deplorable since their rights have not been respected in the law and are discriminated against because of their gender.

    According to Article 1210 of the Constitution, a girl is mature when she is 9 lunar years.

    Article 1041 sanctions marriage of girl children at the age of 13 and even younger with the consent of their father.

    Article 1105 of the Constitution reiterates that man is the head of the household.  Article 1117 states that man can prevent his wife from being employed in any profession or industry if doing so contradicts the family’s interests.

    According to articles 1123 and 1124 of the Constitution, a man can divorce his wife if she gets sick. Whereas woman faces numerous obstacles in filing for divorce.

    The few above mentioned examples violate Iranian woman’s basic rights. Naturally, the situation is much worse in the case of women who live in rural areas as they also have to grapple with absolute poverty and destitution.

    The information in this report has been compiled from a limited number of reports which appeared in the state media.

    Noteworthy is that most of the problems mentioned for one or two villages are common to all villages and the differences are not significant.

    1-lack of Access to infrastructures

    LACK OF ACCESS TO INFRASTRUCTURES

    2-Food security and nutrition

    FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION

    3-Access to medical care

    ACCESS TO MEDICAL CARE

    4-Access to education

    ACCESS OF EDUCATION

    5-Marriage of girl children and sale of girls

    MARRIAGE OF GIRL CHILDREN AND SALE OF GIRLS

    6-Gender-based violence

    GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE

    7-Employment and wages

    EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES

    8-Shanty dwelling

    SHANTY DWELLING

    9-Social activities and status

    SOCIAL ACTIVITIES AND STATUS

    10-Participation in political decision making

    PARTICIPATION IN POLITICAL DECISION MAKING

    11-Access to the internet technology

    ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TECHNOLOGY

    12-Some telling examples

    Photos of rural women who carry the burden of life in underprivileged villages are more telling than anything else.

    SOME TELLING EXAMPLES

     Download English Version

    Humans without rights

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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:37 pm on 1 Mar 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Iranian Women's Struggle, Women   

    Iran Protests: Role of women in protests of Dec. 2017 and Jan. 2018 

    Iran Protests: Role of women in protests of Dec. 2017 and Jan. 2018

    Iranian courageous women played an important role in recent protests in Iran, these protests are continuing.

    Here(in this video) is a collection of scenes from people’s uprising

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:06 pm on 25 Jan 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , The girl of Enghelab street, Theran, , Vida Movahed, , Women   

    Iran regime must free the woman who took stand against compulsory veiling 

    Vida Movahed

    The image of a young Iranian woman protesting against the compulsory hijab quickly went viral on social media.

    Amnesty International is calling on Iranian authorities to “immediately and unconditionally” release a woman who was arrested in Tehran last month for apparently protesting peacefully against the country’s mandatory Islamic dress code.

    In a January 24 statement, the London-based rights group also reiterated its calls on the authorities to “end the persecution of women who speak out against compulsory veiling, and abolish this discriminatory and humiliating practice.”

    A video showing the woman standing on a concrete structure in Tehran’s Enghelab (Revolution) Street without wearing a headscarf has gone viral on social media since December 27.

    She was silently waving a white flag in an apparent protest against the compulsory hijab, which in Iran refers to Islamic dress that covers the hair and body.

    Amnesty International quoted three eyewitnesses as saying that police arrested the woman on the spot and transferred her to a nearby detention center.

    Her name, Vida Movahed, is said to be 31 years old and has a 19-month-old baby.

    She boldly protested the compulsory veil in crowded downtown Tehran by taking off her shawl and waving it in the air on a stick. Simultaneously, she spoke about freedom and women’s right to choose their own clothing. A number of youths present in the scene gave her support.

    The incident took place on Wednesday, December 27, 2017, in Tehran’s Enghelab Avenue. The State Security forces arrested the young woman and the young passersby who had supported her.

    The arrests were made the same day as Tehran’s police chief claimed that no one would be arrested for mal-veiling. He said no criminal complaints would be filed for them, they will not be sent to court but will have to attend “educational” classes to correct their behavior. (The state-run Tasnim news agency – December 27, 2017)

    But the reality that exists in Iran today is that the repression of women was not unique to this young woman.

    The NCRI Women’s Committee, published a video about detainees during Iran protests especially women.  According to the information released by the committee, 400 women have been arrested in the southwestern city of Izeh, alone. Dozens of women have been arrested in Tehran. Seven women arrested in the city of Saqqez, in Iranian Kurdistan.
    In the first two weeks of January, 50 were shot dead and at least 8000 people have been arrested for taking part in the uprising and exercising their rights to freedom of expression and association.  At least 10 of these prisoners have been tortured to death in prison.

    The NCRI Women’s Committee echoes the Iranian people’s demand is to take urgent action to immediately release all those imprisoned under torture for taking part in the uprising.

    The fact is, the most striking images coming from Iran uprising are of women.
    They are risking the most to speak out against the Iranian regime.
    Women have demonstrated tremendous courage in the nationwide protests.
    The NCRI Women’s Committee calls on all freedom loving people of the world to support the struggle of Iranian women in their quest for freedom.

    Maryam Rajavi Iran opposition leader urges Council of Europe to compel Tehran to release arrested, she said:

    I urge the Council of Europe and its member states to take effective measures and binding decisions to compel the religious fascism to:

    -Immediate freedom of the prisoners of the uprising
    -Freedom of expression and association;

    No more repression and no more compulsory veil;

    Now and just today.

    Also, a petition has been prepared for the release of the detainees of Iran protests, to be sent to the Secretary-General of the UN. By signing this petition and sharing the news of the detainees, including the girl of Enghelab Street, we should try to release them.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:33 am on 25 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Girl, , , , Sarpol-e-Zahab, Women   

    Teenage girl becomes a national heroine 

    Haniyeh2

    In the ancient myths, the stereotype for a hero has always been a big, strong man. Recently, however, a story has been circulating in the internet about a frail, young girl who has been named a national hero.

    Haniyeh, 13, used to live in Sarpol-e Zahab, the epicenter of the earthquake that hit Kermanshah Province in western Iran on November 12, 2017.

    “We were at home that night when the earthquake struck,” says Haniyeh. “Our grandma was staying with us that night. We started to run but as I was running away, I suddenly remembered my little sister who was sleeping upstairs on the carpet. So, I ran back inside.”

    As soon as Haniyeh finds and grabs her sister, a steel bar falls from the roof and hits her back and the power goes off…

    “The next thing I remember is that my father came with his car and took us to hospital. My mother was taken to Tehran.”

    Haniyeh’s spine has been severed, but she says, “I do not regret what I did. I’d never wanted my little sister to be in my place.”

    Haniyeh is presently hospitalized in a Kermanshah hospital whose officials are recommending that she be taken to a convalescence home for the elderly.

    Had it been in some other country, Haniyeh would have received numerous awards and offered government aid to receive medical treatment and gain back her health. In Iran, however, the only help available for this young teenager is the elderly house.

    Is this her reward for a loving sister who jeopardized her own life and future opportunities to save her toddler sibling?

    One of the hospital nurses says if she receives a good treatment and physiotherapy there is a chance for her to gain back her health.

    Haniyeh is one out of hundreds of young little girls who have lost their homes and parents in the earthquake in Kermanshah. She is one out of thousands of little girls who are deprived of opportunities and are discriminated against all across Iran. The girl children who burned in Shinabad school, and those who died while taken on a tour by their school.

    Despite pervading injustices, Iran’s women and girls are the force for change and they are the ones who will realize equality and freedom for the whole nation.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:07 am on 15 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: FLogging, , Student Day, Women, Young Woman   

    Iran: Flogging Sentence for a Young Kurdish Female Student 

    Flogging a young woman

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran condemns the flogging sentence issued for a young Kurdish female student and calls on the Iranian women and youth to protest against such criminal verdicts.

    The NCRI Women’s Committee urges international human rights and women’s rights organizations to undertake effective measures to stop such cruel and inhuman punishments.

    On December 7, the Student Day in Iran, the clerical regime’s court in Saqqez, Iranian Kurdistan, sentenced Zamaneh Zivi to cash fine and 50 lashes of the whip on the charge of “disruption of public order.” She is a senior student of law at Payam Noor University of Saqqez in Kurdistan.

    The Iranian regime’s resort to such an inhuman punishment for a girl student only indicates its fear of rebellions by the Iranian people, particularly the students and youth. It also reveals the true nature of Rouhani, the mullahs’ president who pretends to be a moderate.

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran
    December 14, 2017

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:12 pm on 8 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Annual Report 2017, , , , , Women   

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran 

    Annual-Report-2017-500x300

    By Masoud Dalvand

    Iran’s Human Rights Monitor has issued a comprehensive annual report of the shameful human rights situation under the rule of criminal mullahs. Referring to the report of Ms. Jahangir, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Iran, explains about the lack of an independent judiciary in Iran and numerous violations of the basic rights of the Iranian people and the suppression and increase of oppression in Iran.

    In this report, the latest criminality of the Iranian regime can be seen in the deliberate neglect of the state of the earthquake in the west of the country.

    Also, with regard to the right to life for humans, the increasing number of executions and arbitrary murders in Iran has been addressed.

    The report provides good information on the situation of Iranian prisons and prisoners in general, in particular political prisoners and women imprisoned, and the intensification of suppression and the very inhuman situation of detainees.

    Another part of the report describes the retaliation against human rights activists in Iran by the mullahs regime.

    Non-human punishments and punishments, such as flogging in public and amputations, are another part of this comprehensive report.

    floggings

    Violations of freedom of expression, the press, religious minorities and ethnic minorities are another part of this annual report.

    Baha'i

    Baha’is

    The violation of the economic, social and cultural rights of the Iranian people, such as workers and child laborers, has been described by the Iranian regime in this report.

    child laborers

    Video:

    You can read this comprehensive report on the link below:

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:31 pm on 27 Nov 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Women   

    Theresia Bothe singing in solidarity with the women of Iranian Resistance 

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:33 pm on 26 Nov 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Women   

    International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Those whose sufferings are not seen or heard. 

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:02 pm on 22 Nov 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Women   

    Iran: Where the regime opposes women’s rights 

    Women pray for Iranian soldiers killed during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war at the Imamzadeh Saleh shrine in Tehran on August 2, 2017. (Reuters)

    Every year, the day November 25 comes as a grim reminder that we have a long way to go for achieving gender parity. There are still many countries in the world where women cannot fully exercise the right to shape their own destiny. Violence against women is another detestable vestige of the mostly patriarchal societies inherited by our generation.

    It may seem that we have come a long way since the Dark Ages, but there are still some countries in the world that have made little progress in according equal rights to women and men. There is even a country where misogyny is the order of the day and where women have no legal rights.

    It may come as a shock to many, but Iran continues to run in this way. The Iranian regime may keep up pretences in public on issues related to women’s rights, but in practice women remain second class citizens in that country.

    Subhuman treatment of women

    It is not difficult to prove that Iranian theocrats are opposed to the idea of gender equality. Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has been quoted as saying: “Gender equality is ‘Zionist plot’ aimed at corrupting the role of women in society.” In Iran’s version of religious law, women are considered property.

    Their inheritance is half of what men receive and women are not allowed to leave the country without their husband’s consent. They are also forced to observe a very strict dress code. There are several security measures in place in Iran to impose these laws. The most repressive one is the infamous ‘morality police’ that roams around cities arresting young women for not observing the dress code.

    There are gruesome videos on YouTube and other social media showing how women are treated in Iran for what they wear. In a recent incident, a 14-year-old girl was beaten and detained for wearing ripped jeans in Iran (one of many such cases of police brutality against women). After her arrest by Islamic Revolutionary Guard Coups (IRGC) unit, she said: “I still carry the bruises sustained from their beatings on my face … my ribs still hurt.”

    ANALYSIS: Iranian regime and its appalling violation of children’s rights

    Women in Iran are also banned from entering sports stadiums. In a recently reported case by Human Rights Watch (HRW), a woman named Mina tried to get under the radar of security forces to watch a volleyball match in 2016. Despite her attempt to watch the match from the roof top of a café near a volleyball stadium, she and a few other women were caught by IRGC and were evicted from their vantage point.

    Irrespective of their position in society, women in Iran have no right to travel without the consent of their husband or father. Hassan Rouhani and his predecessor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had once made bogus promises of giving women more rights in order to garner their votes. In May this year, Rouhani had spread the word that he might appoint a women minster in his cabinet. But soon after his sham election he did not include any woman in his cabinet.

    Women in Iran are legally required to wear a hijab in public and this law is strictly enforced by morality police. (Photo courtesy: Iran Human Rights)

    Iranian women defy repression

    However, Iranian women seize every opportunity to show their resistance against their ill-treatment by the regime. After Khamenei’s ridiculous fatwa banning women from riding a bike in public last year, women in Iran came out in droves riding their bikes in defiance. According to the state-run media, Khamenei issued a decree on 10 September 2016 wherein he said: “Riding a bicycle often attracts the attention of men and exposes the society to corruption, and as contravenes women’s chastity so it must be abandoned”.

    Since the first day of the installation of the regime, Iranian women have resisted their attempts at oppression. Back in the day, Iran like other countries of the Middle East could hardly imagine any role for women other than staying at home and taking care of children.

    One woman took the lead in this struggle for freedom which was no longer about just freeing Iranian women but the entire Iranian society, which was taken hostage by the regime. Maryam Rajavi, president of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), an educated woman has done the impossible and instilled thousands of Iranian men and women with the idea that all citizens in the country can struggle for a common cause: Freedom.

    ALSO READ: Iran Guards ‘recruiting Afghan children as young as 14’ to fight in Syria

    She has proven through her leadership role that the same deprived and underprivileged woman is no different than her male counterpart in struggling for a free and democratic society. She has built a blueprint for building a better Iran with her 10-point plan, wherein women are deemed fully equal to men in all spheres of social activity.

    There would be no limits for women in this new Iran. Filling the highest political positions will no longer be just a dream for women. The Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK) — the biggest Iranian opposition group and a member of the NCRI — has followed her teachings for years and is now led by her.

    Violence against women in Iran is institutionalized simply because half of the society is treated as crippled and in need of guidance from men; be it the male head of the family or males in the state itself. Thus, the status of women will never change in Iran as long as the present regime is in power.

    ______________________
    Reza Shafiee (@shafiee_shafiee) is a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI).

    Source: Iran: Where the regime opposes women’s rights

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:06 pm on 26 Oct 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , U.N. Special Rapporteur, Women   

    UN Special Rapporteur Speaks on Dismal Human Rights Situation in Iran 

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran addressed the Seventy-second session of the General Assembly in New York on October 25, to discuss the dismal situation of human rights in Iran that has been prevalent since the Regime took over in 1979.

    Asma Jahangir, who was addressing the General Assembly for the first time since taking the role in November 2016, delivered a report on the first six months of 2017 which was based on sources both inside and outside of Iran.

    Executions

    Jahangir explained that she was worried about the rate of executions in Iran, as well she should be. Currently, Iran has the highest execution rate per capita and is one of the few countries to still execute juvenile offenders, in clear violation of the UN’s Rights of the Child charter.

    She said: “I am concerned by the rate of executions in Iran. Reports indicate that since the beginning of the year 435 persons have been executed…At least four juvenile offenders were executed, and 86 more are known to be on death row, although the actual figure may be higher. I take the opportunity to reiterate my request for a list of all juvenile offenders on death row and reiterate my appeal to the Iranian authorities to urgently abolish the sentencing of children to death, and to engage in a comprehensive process of commutation of all death sentences issued against children, in line with juvenile justice standards.”

    Jahangir also expressed concern about the death sentence levied against spiritual leader Mohammad Ali Taheri for so-called corruption on earth- an exceptionally vague charge which the mullahs use when you haven’t actually committed a crime but they want to punish you anyway.

    Taheri’s trial is believed to have violated several international standards including due process and coercion of witnesses. As such, Jahangir called for his conviction to be overturned.

    She said: “I call for the immediate withdrawal of charges against Mr. Taheri and for his unconditional release, and the withdrawal of charges against all individuals held for peaceful exercise of freedom of expression, religion, or belief.”

    Cruel and Unusual Punishment

    Jahangir also raised the worrying issue of torture, corporal punishment, and the denial of medical care to coerce confessions and punish people, which violates human rights law and international standards of justice.

    She said: “I regretfully note that amputation, blinding, flogging, and the continued use of prolonged solitary confinement continues to be regularly practised. I am also deeply concerned by consistent reports of the denial of access to proper and necessary medical treatment of detainees, including the deprival of medical care as a form of punishment.”

    Many political prisoners have gone on hunger strikes to protest the dismal conditions they are being kept in and the Regime refuses to allow them access to sorely needed medical care.

    Prisoners of conscience

    While on the topic of political prisoners, it is important to discuss the routine detention of human rights defenders, journalists, religious minorities, ethnic minorities, and political campaigners for freedom of expression and peaceful activism.

    As of June 2017, no less than 26 journalists/bloggers had been arrested and/or sentenced for exercising press freedom. Many more had been harassed and/or intimidated by the Regime through interrogation, surveillance, amongst other things.

    Jahangir even spoke to those working at the BBC Persian Service who had been harassed by the Regime and told that if they continued working their relatives would be targeted and their assets would be frozen.

    She said: “They all sought private meetings for fear of the consequence of being identified as having provided information to my mandate.”

    Another worrying trend is that of the imprisonment of dual nationals, like UK charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who have been accused of spying for Western countries and sentenced to many years in jail.

    The 1988 Massacre

    This persecution of ordinary Iranians based on their political beliefs is not a recent phenomenon but is well ingrained in the Iranian Regime’s DNA.

    In 1988, the Regime slaughtered over 30,000 political prisoners in just a couple of months. They buried their bodies in mass graves, refused to tell the families what had happened, and attempted to hide their “crime against humanity” from the rest of the world.

    Despite recent acknowledgements of the genocide from the highest-ranking members of the Regime, the international community has still been largely silent and this silence must end.

    Jahangir said: “The families of the victims have a right to remedy, reparation, and the right to know about the truth of these events and the fate of the victims without risking reprisal. I therefore reiterate my call upon the Government to ensure that a thorough and independent investigation into these events is carried out.”

    Rights of Women

    As you can imagine, women in Iran are routinely oppressed by the Iranian Regime, whether its mandatory dress codes, banning women from attending sports matches, arresting people from reading and sharing feminist literature, excluding women from certain occupations, or many more misogynistic things.

    Jahangir said: “I call upon the Government to address these concerns in practice, and in legislation through ratifying the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and to repeal all laws and policies that discriminate against women and girls.”

    Jahangir paid tribute to the many human rights defenders who have risked their lives to speak to her about the situation in Iran.

    She said: “I have received ongoing and consistent reports of harassment, intimidation, and prosecutions of human rights defenders. For example, the well respected human rights defender, Narges Mohammadi, continues to be imprisoned simply because of her commitment to human rights. I am also deeply concerned by the reports of attacks on women human rights defenders in the form of judicial harassment, detention, and smear campaigns.”

    Even those living outside Iran fear reprisals from the Regime’s many terrorist proxy groups or that their family will be targeted by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

    What’s next for Iran?

    Jahangir expressed hope that the situation would improve through diplomatic action, but this does not seem likely.

    Iran regime’s President Hassan Rouhani made various promises during his campaign, which echoed promises that he made and did not follow through on after taking office in 2013. This so-called moderate has seen over 3,000 people executed during his four-year term and continues to see the Iranian people suppressed at the hands of the Regime.

    The only way to achieve human rights in Iran is through regime change by and for the people of Iran.

     
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