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  • Masoud Dalvand 3:03 pm on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Women   

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence. 

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence.
    The Coroner’s Office of Tehran, capital of Iran, declared that it has registered the names of 12,159 women as victims of violence in four months.
    The public relations of the General Department of the Coroner’s Office of Tehran Province announced that in the four months since the beginning of the Persian New Year (March 21, 2017) until July 21, 2017, it has registered the names of 33,362 people, 12,159 of them women, who had referred to the forensic centers of Tehran province due to injuries they suffered in physical fights. (The state-run Mehr news agency – September 23, 2017)

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/iran-women-news/4327-iran-over-12-000-women-registered-as-victims-of-violence

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  • Masoud Dalvand 7:07 am on September 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Women,   

    The NCRI Women’s Committee condemns the assassinations of two Syrian activist women in Istanbul 

    The NCRI Women_s Committee condemns the assassinations of

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran condemns the cowardly murder of Orouba Barakat and her daughter, Halla Barakat. The two Syrian activist women were stabbed to death in their apartment in Istanbul.

    The Women’s Committee extends sincere condolences to the Syrian Opposition and particularly to the combatant women of Syria. Many news agencies have attributed the assassinations to the Assad dictatorship.

    Mrs. Orouba Barakat was a veteran figure of the Syrian Opposition who played a serious role in exposing the crimes of Bashar Assad particularly in the regime’s medieval prisons. She had done research on the practice of torture in these prisons. Her daughter, Halla Barakat, was also a Syrian activist and a journalist working with the opposition’s TV, the Orient News. Mrs. Orouba was familiar with the Iranian Resistance and especially respected the PMOI women and their struggle against the religious dictatorship in Iran.

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran

    September 23, 2017

    Source: The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran website

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:00 am on September 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Women   

    Our movement is summed up in the word of hope! 

    Sahar_Gholam

    Sahar Gholamali

    With her penetrating gaze, she looks around. After hearing the questions, she reflects for a moment and begins replying with a sweet smile. The passage of time and life’s adversities have not affected her cheerfulness nor her expressive words, perhaps because she made her decision years ago and pledged to fight as long as it may take.

    And this is how she describes her life story:
    My name is Sahar Gholamali.  I was born in Evin Prison and now I am part of the Iranian Resistance.
    I know I might be a rare example to answer “in jail” in response to the question “where were you born?”  Prison is indeed the most dreadful, the strangest and the most difficult place to welcome a newborn.

    During those years, in the 1980s, my parents, who were both supporters of the opposition Mojahedin (PMOI/MEK), were arrested for their political and social activities.
    The only reason for their arrest was their belief in freedom and their opposition to a regime which had come to establish a religious dictatorship in Iran.

    Shortly after the arrest of my pregnant mother, I was born in prison, in a place which lacked the minimum facilities, health standards, and even the least possibility of receiving proper love and care from my mother.
    If it weren’t for the help of the other inmates, I don’t know what would have happened to me.
    They helped my mother however they could. Some provided clothes, some gave their share of food, and more importantly, they dressed my mother’s wounds, and pampered me so I could survive and grow.

    My father was also in prison. His interrogators put pressure on him to give in to their demands if he wished to see me. But he refused to bow down and cave in to their demand.
    This was the greatest test for a young father: to see his newborn daughter in exchange for betrayal and cooperation!
    My father, however, courageously chose the more difficult option and bravely stood up to his enemies to his last breath. Eventually he was executed in the ‘80s without ever seeing me.

    I spent the first year of my life in prison until I was taken out with the efforts of our family and friends. So I grew up away from my enchained mother.

    I was about 4 years old, when my mother got released from prison and we went to Ashraf, Iraq.
    In Ashraf, I was able to go to school and study like many other kids my age.

    A few years passed and the situation changed for worse with the start of the war and the US attack on Iraq.
    The bombings continued day and night and it was not safe for children to stay any longer.
    With the help of the PMOI, my mother decided to send me abroad, to a safer place.
    I went to Canada and was embraced by a family who provided me with a very comfortable and privileged life. I had good friends, good life, good education and whatever that a young girl could wish for. But during the quiet moments when I had the chance to reflect, I would reminisce about my identity, the sacrifices of my mother and my father’s courage, memories which never faded. It was as if there was a calling not to forget my father…nor my mother and my country, Iran.

    As I grew older, I began to read about Iran and the Resistance, particularly about the PMOI. Whatever information available about Iran was about the dictatorship, the arrests, imprisonment, torture, and executions! Suppression of women, imprisonment of youths, and blocking all means of freedom of expression!

    On the opposite end of the continuum was the Resistance and the PMOI, a group of women and men who, like my father, had chosen to pay any price it takes to free their country.  They had given up their families, children, careers, and all the things we strive for in life.

    Often times during my readings, my mind would wander off with such questions as how was my father able to resist seeing me despite all his fatherly emotions towards me?  Could it be so simple for a father?
    How come my mother was arrested and imprisoned while pregnant? How did she endure all that torture with a baby inside her? It’s even hard to conceive of a pregnant woman inside a prison cell.
    How did thousands of women, such as my aunt Azam, pay the price of humanity by withstanding severe tortures to be the teachers and role models of our generation and generations to come? So…
    So there must be a will within us that can guide us through the hardest of difficulties!
    It can make the impossible possible! It can make one productive!
    So…
    I can also want for the children in Iran to be able to enjoy the same beautiful and complete life I have in Canada!
    I can willingly and consciously give up my desires and blessings and join a Resistance which has the goal of bringing such goodness to an 80-million nation!

    That’s how I made my decision and now I am in the Iranian Resistance among one thousand women who have been labeled as “the heroines of Iranian history.”
    Honestly, I have come across many heroes in various books and stories but I never thought that one day I could be part of a group of people who were dubbed “heroes.”

    At the same time, one thing has always been very close and conceivable to me: That my father can see me more than any other time and he smiles at me, a smile filled with honor and pride for standing and persevering.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:03 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Women   

    Iran regime continues to bar Iranian women from going to sport stadiums 

    women-behind-the-stadum

    TEHRAN (AFP), 04 September 2017  – For a brief moment, Iran’s female football fans thought they were finally allowed to attend a match, but their hopes were dashed on Monday when authorities said their tickets were sold by mistake.

    Women have been barred from attending football matches, and some other sporting events such as wrestling, since the 1979 Islamic revolution, with officials saying they must be protected from the vulgar atmosphere.

    But when seats for Tuesday’s qualifying match against Syria at Tehran’s Azadi stadium went on sale on Saturday, many were shocked to see an option for women’s tickets on the website.

    Some shared their surprise and joy on Twitter with a Farsi hashtag meaning ‘I_have_ticket’.

    ‘I was extremely excited… it was unbelievable,’ football fan Arefeh Elyasi told the Shahrvand newspaper on Monday.

    Another woman, Zahra Jafarzadeh, said she bought a ticket even though she does not really like football.

     

    what is the official explanation for the ban? There isn’t any.

         What is the official explanation for the ban? There isn’t any

    ‘I felt that if didn’t sign up, I would be missing a major event,’ she told the newspaper.

    Having never been inside the stadium, some worried about which seat to choose.

    ‘My friend’s mother told me to get a seat where the ball wouldn’t hit my head,’ said Negin Bagheri.

    But it did not take long for reality to reimpose itself, as Iran’s football federation said it was all a mistake.

    ‘There is no plan to allow the presence of women in Azadi stadium for the Iran-Syria match,’ it said in a statement, blaming a ‘technical glitch’.

    Tickets held by women would all be cancelled and refunded, it said.

    ‘Maybe we all knew that we would not be allowed to enter the stadium despite buying the ticket,’ Elyasi said.

    ‘But we wanted to make our voice heard by the officials.’

    Iran was among the first teams to qualify for the 2018 world cup finals in Russia, and celebrations are planned for after the Syria game.

    Azadi Stadium

    Azadi Stadium

    Women are allowed to watch some sports, though the rules can change with little warning.

    There was shock in 2014 when women were suddenly banned from volleyball matches without explanation, although they have since been allowed to return to some events in segregated seats.

    Source: Iran regime continues to bar Iranian women from going to sport stadiums

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:28 am on August 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Misogynism of Mullahs, Women   

    Iran: Judiciary official opposes adoption of VAW bill 

    VAW

    “The bill on combating violence against women (in Iran) has been drafted from a merely sexual perspective.”

    Making this comment on August 24, 2017, legal deputy to the Judiciary, Zabihollah Khoda’ian, expressed his opposition to the adoption of the VAW bill. He justified his view by the fact that 70 out of 100 articles of the bill are “criminalizing”, “setting prison sentences for even the slightest tensions between couples.”

    If adopted, the VAW bill is going to be named “provision of security for women against violence”, and it mostly focuses on domestic violence overlooking pervasive violence committed against Iranian womenevery day at the workplace, in the streets and public places, and in prisons by the so-called law enforcement and plainclothes agents, Revolutionary Guards and Bassij, as well as government and private sector employers and employees.

    According to Hossein Ashtari, Commander of the State Security Force, an average of 2000 women are forcibly and violently arrested every day across Iran and mistreated and humiliated in detention centers for not fully observing the compulsory veil.

    At the same time, hundreds of rights activists are tortured and maltreated in Iranian prisons.

    As for domestic violence, Tehran’s forensic officials declared in January 2017, that after road accidents and street fights, the main reason for referring to the Coroner’s Office in Tehran is harassment by husbands. On the average, 52 women refer to the Coroner’s Office every day.

    This is only “less than 35 per cent” of the cases of domestic violence which are reported. According to Mohammad Ali Esfanani, spokesman of the legal and judicial committee in the parliament, in December 2014, “out of 180 complaints, 128 are not interested in following up their complaint.”

    In 2014, Rouhani’s deputy on women and family affairs Shahindokht Molaverdi revealed that 32 volumes of books containing the outcome of a national research done on domestic violence against women “have been lost” and no copies of them can be found “in the Ministry of Interior or the directorate for women and family affairs.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:20 am on August 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Fatemeh Amini, , , , , Women   

    Fatemeh Amini, Symbol of perseverance and steadfastness 

    fatemeh_amini_eng

    There are people who make up cornerstones on which a long history of resistance is built for millions to follow.

    There are grim wills that make the enemy fall on its knees and overcome its cruelty and savagery.

    There are humans that look on to the horizons, calmly sing the beautiful song of life and then become eternal.

    Fatemeh Amini was one such human being.Fatemeh Amine 1

    Fatemeh was born in the city of Mashhad (northeastern Iran) to a religious family who were political and progressive. She, too, started her political activities against the Shah’s dictatorship in 1962 when she was studying at Mashhad University’s School of Literature. Soon, she and her friends founded the Association of Progressive Women.

    Fatemeh graduated from university in 1964 and began teaching in girls’ high schools in Mashhad. At the same time, she tried to familiarize them with social and political issues.

    In 1970, Fatemeh moved to Tehran where she got to know the newly founded People’s Mojahedin of Iran (PMOI), and after a short period of active involvement, she became a member of the group.

    In 1971, the Shah’s secret police (SAVAK) launched a major campaign to discover and clampdown on dissident groups, including the PMOI. A large number of the group members were arrested and imprisoned.

    In the very difficult conditions that ensued, Fatemeh secretly but persistently continued her activities. However, she was also arrested in March 1975.

    To have an open hand in torturing her, SAVAK had a news published in the daily newspapers indicating that Fatemeh Amini had been found dead after falling from a mountain.

    So, Fatemeh was flogged and tortured for days and months until she was paralyzed, but she put up a staunch resistance and did not give any information to SAVAK.

    Finally, she was killed under torture on August 16, 1975.

    Fatemeh Amini was the first PMOI woman to be killed in struggle, but she did not die as thousands of young women followed her example in the subsequent years.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:11 am on August 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Farzaneh Jalali, , , , Women   

    Iran: Repeated summoning of Farzaneh Jalali to Intelligence Department 

    Farzaneh Jalali

    Farzaneh Jalali

    Women and children’s rights activist, Farzaneh Jalali, has been repeatedly summoned to the Intelligence Department of Kermanshah, western Iran, to be interrogated.

    Ms. Jalali’s lawyer, Mostafa Ahmadian said, “The verbal summoning of his client has been illegal and the interrogations have made her upset.”

    Ahmadian asserted, “Unfortunately, my client has cooperated (so far), but I have asked her to ignore such calls until she receives written summon or emails based on legal standards.”

    “My client is under pressure from many respects and I am not legally allowed to speak about them,” Ahmadian added.

    Mostafa Ahmadian also declared that his client’s case has been declared inaccessible which is illegal and for this reason, he is not informed of the content of the case and the reasons based on which Ms. Jalali has been charged with “action against national security.”

    Farzaneh Jalali is a women’s rights activist from Kermanshah. For her activities, she was deprived of college education. On February 24, 2017, she was arrested by security forces and taken to the detention center at Naft Square of Kermanshah. On March 13, 2017, she was released from prison on a heavy bail of 300 million toumans.

    Ms. Jalali is a graduate of social anthropology from Tehran University, a former member of the students’ Islamic Association, and former editor of the university’s Sobh Daily. Despite the fact that she had passed the graduate school’s admission test with the sixth highest scores in 2010, she was deprived of continuing her education due to her student activities.

    Over the past years, she has been active with regards to women and children’s rights. She was active in gaining support for the students burned in the fire incident at a girls’ school in Shinabad Village, West Azerbaijan Province. She has also written and published a number of articles in defense of women’s rights and violations of their rights.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:29 pm on August 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Women   

    Women’s Rights in Iran Lag Far Behind Rest of the International Community 

    Within the world of the theocratic regime that rules Iran, the role of women is primarily relegated to the home. Women have limited to no access to the public and political spheres. Those who try to achieve more for themselves find that they are now putting themselves directly in opposition to the regime of the mullahs.

    One such instance is the case of Safieh Gharebaghi, a civil rights activist and female rights activist was summoned to the Zanjan Pubic and Revolutionary Court on August 6. At that point, she was charged with “spreading propaganda against the government”, “disrupting public opinion”, “publishing lies and spreading rumors”, and “supporting the sedition”. Although she is out on bail now, her case is still waiting to be tried.

    She is just one activist among hundreds that are being targeted by the regime, because the ideas they spread are contrary to the key tenets of the fundamentalism proscribed by the mullahs.

    Part of the control that the regime attempts to exert involves morality patrols and specific police meant to address how women look, act, and spend time with in a public setting.

    Recently, the Prosecutor of Qom said that a special female (Islamic Guidance) patrol team was allocated to inspect women’s public centers.

    “The Special Qom Presecutor Patrol Team, with the management of female judges, will inspect women’s centers, including studios, swimming pools, women’s gyms, and beauty salons,” said Mehdi Kaheh. “This team has so far inspected more than 45 beauty salons and 10 swimming pools and has given each place legal notices regarding their offenses with a timeframe. If they do not amend the mentioned affairs, they will be legally and judicially dealt with.”

    Keep in mind that these are not health and safety infractions, but infringe on the basic freedoms of choice that all individuals deserve. But at the same time, while resources are being put to controlling the movements of women, social challenges are impacting women negatively.

    For example, in Tehran, 700 women were found among the homeless population, which numbers over 15,000. Additionally, women who have limited opportunities for employment are being left as the sole guardians of their families. This puts them in the position of trying to take care of their families with poverty as a constant threat.

    All of these issues are impacting women and their lack of a political voice is making the social constraints even worse. What the opposition offers to the Iranian people is a gender equality and a restoration of basic human rights and freedoms. Regime change is the only way to restore the rights of women within this country, setting a model for the rest of the region.

    via Women’s Rights in Iran Lag Far Behind Rest of the International Community — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:51 am on August 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Women   

    Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ 

    by Siavosh Hosseini 

    The Iranian regime has increasingly focused on clamping down on anyone who speaks out against the human rights abuses of its ruling class. One of the key areas where this is demonstrated is in the trials of these individuals. Many lack basic legal representation, and the proceedings are brief. If they do have legal representation, there are often hurdles for them to meet with their lawyers and having access to court files delayed.

    Human rights lawyers who speak out against torture and unfair trials have also faced harassment, disbarment, and imprisonment. Trials of human rights defenders generally take place in a climate of fear.

    Amnesty International recently launched a global campaign ‘Brave’, calling for an end to attacks against those defending human rights worldwide.

    “It is a bitter irony that as the Iranian authorities boast about their increased engagement with the UN and the EU, particularly in the aftermath of the nuclear deal, human rights defenders who have made contact with these same institutions are being treated as criminals,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Research and Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

    “Rather than propagating the dangerous myth that human rights defenders pose a threat to national security, the Iranian authorities should focus on addressing the legitimate concerns they raise. These are people who have risked everything to build a more humane and just society – it is appalling that they are so viciously punished for their bravery.”

    Amnesty International, who released a new report entitled ‘Caught in a web of repression: Iran’s human rights defenders under attack’, is calling on the EU to speak out in the strongest terms against the persecution of human rights defenders in the country.

    “The international community, and in particular the EU, must not stay silent over the outrageous treatment of human rights defenders in Iran,” said Luther. “Instead of appeasing Iranian officials, the EU should forcefully call for the immediate and unconditional release of all those jailed for their peaceful human rights activism and for an end to the misuse of the justice system to silence activists.”

    This recent report detailed the crackdown on human rights defenders in a variety of key areas, including the death penalty, women’s rights, and trade unionists, just to name a few.

    Over the past four years, Iran’s judiciary have dropped the threshold for invoking the vague national security-related charges, while increasing the length of prison sentences for these individuals. Many of their crimes include contacting the UN and the EU, as well as international agencies focused on human rights.

    via  Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:14 pm on August 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Women   

    Feminine Face of Poverty in Iran 

    This video clip has been posted on the internet from Iran: 

    Look. Behind me is a woman covered up in veil (chador); she’s wearing a mask to prevent being identified. She is looking through the garbage and trash containers in this late hour of night. She’s looking to find and collect something that she might need to stay alive.
    I don’t know but such people seem to be really honorable. When a woman wraps up herself in a chador and does not want to be recognized and looks through the garbage, it means that she’s been left no other way. There is no organization and no agency in our country to support them and they have to live in this way.
    Is this really what the situation in our country is? Is this the motto in this country about chastity and veil and is this the way they support women?

     
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