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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:13 am on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , The People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran   

    Platform for future Iran. Free Iran with Maryam Rajavi 

    Maryam Rajavi’s speech on Nowruz (Iranian new year, 21 March 2017) in the PMOI Gathering/ 2017

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  • Masoud Dalvand 7:00 am on September 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Our movement is summed up in the word of hope! 

    Sahar_Gholam

    Sahar Gholamali

    With her penetrating gaze, she looks around. After hearing the questions, she reflects for a moment and begins replying with a sweet smile. The passage of time and life’s adversities have not affected her cheerfulness nor her expressive words, perhaps because she made her decision years ago and pledged to fight as long as it may take.

    And this is how she describes her life story:
    My name is Sahar Gholamali.  I was born in Evin Prison and now I am part of the Iranian Resistance.
    I know I might be a rare example to answer “in jail” in response to the question “where were you born?”  Prison is indeed the most dreadful, the strangest and the most difficult place to welcome a newborn.

    During those years, in the 1980s, my parents, who were both supporters of the opposition Mojahedin (PMOI/MEK), were arrested for their political and social activities.
    The only reason for their arrest was their belief in freedom and their opposition to a regime which had come to establish a religious dictatorship in Iran.

    Shortly after the arrest of my pregnant mother, I was born in prison, in a place which lacked the minimum facilities, health standards, and even the least possibility of receiving proper love and care from my mother.
    If it weren’t for the help of the other inmates, I don’t know what would have happened to me.
    They helped my mother however they could. Some provided clothes, some gave their share of food, and more importantly, they dressed my mother’s wounds, and pampered me so I could survive and grow.

    My father was also in prison. His interrogators put pressure on him to give in to their demands if he wished to see me. But he refused to bow down and cave in to their demand.
    This was the greatest test for a young father: to see his newborn daughter in exchange for betrayal and cooperation!
    My father, however, courageously chose the more difficult option and bravely stood up to his enemies to his last breath. Eventually he was executed in the ‘80s without ever seeing me.

    I spent the first year of my life in prison until I was taken out with the efforts of our family and friends. So I grew up away from my enchained mother.

    I was about 4 years old, when my mother got released from prison and we went to Ashraf, Iraq.
    In Ashraf, I was able to go to school and study like many other kids my age.

    A few years passed and the situation changed for worse with the start of the war and the US attack on Iraq.
    The bombings continued day and night and it was not safe for children to stay any longer.
    With the help of the PMOI, my mother decided to send me abroad, to a safer place.
    I went to Canada and was embraced by a family who provided me with a very comfortable and privileged life. I had good friends, good life, good education and whatever that a young girl could wish for. But during the quiet moments when I had the chance to reflect, I would reminisce about my identity, the sacrifices of my mother and my father’s courage, memories which never faded. It was as if there was a calling not to forget my father…nor my mother and my country, Iran.

    As I grew older, I began to read about Iran and the Resistance, particularly about the PMOI. Whatever information available about Iran was about the dictatorship, the arrests, imprisonment, torture, and executions! Suppression of women, imprisonment of youths, and blocking all means of freedom of expression!

    On the opposite end of the continuum was the Resistance and the PMOI, a group of women and men who, like my father, had chosen to pay any price it takes to free their country.  They had given up their families, children, careers, and all the things we strive for in life.

    Often times during my readings, my mind would wander off with such questions as how was my father able to resist seeing me despite all his fatherly emotions towards me?  Could it be so simple for a father?
    How come my mother was arrested and imprisoned while pregnant? How did she endure all that torture with a baby inside her? It’s even hard to conceive of a pregnant woman inside a prison cell.
    How did thousands of women, such as my aunt Azam, pay the price of humanity by withstanding severe tortures to be the teachers and role models of our generation and generations to come? So…
    So there must be a will within us that can guide us through the hardest of difficulties!
    It can make the impossible possible! It can make one productive!
    So…
    I can also want for the children in Iran to be able to enjoy the same beautiful and complete life I have in Canada!
    I can willingly and consciously give up my desires and blessings and join a Resistance which has the goal of bringing such goodness to an 80-million nation!

    That’s how I made my decision and now I am in the Iranian Resistance among one thousand women who have been labeled as “the heroines of Iranian history.”
    Honestly, I have come across many heroes in various books and stories but I never thought that one day I could be part of a group of people who were dubbed “heroes.”

    At the same time, one thing has always been very close and conceivable to me: That my father can see me more than any other time and he smiles at me, a smile filled with honor and pride for standing and persevering.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:40 am on September 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Mass Graves of 1988 Massacre, , , The People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran   

    Iran Regime Destroys the Graves of the Martyrs of PMOI/MEK Killed in the 1988 Massacre 

    While hundreds of international figures and lawyers have called for a trial of the regime’s leaders and the perpetrators of the massacre of members and sympathizers of PMOI/MEK in 1988, the Iran regime is trying to destroy the graves of MEK martyrs killed in this crime.

    According to the reports from various parts of Iran, the regime has been eliminating the signs of this MEK genocide in several cities including Ahvaz (southwestern Iran), Mashhad (northeast), Isfahan (center of Iran), Tabriz and Ardabil (northwestern), etc. They seek to destroy the mass graves of MEK members so that the families could not pay tribute to their loved ones the way they have been doing for years in various ways such as cementing the graves or removing the garbage and so on.

    The Iranian regime also destroyed the mass graves of MEK martyrs in Vadi-e Rahmat Cemetery of Tabriz under the pretext of carrying out construction projects. Moreover, the supporters of the MEK distributed the pictures and videos of grave destruction on the internet on June 23 2018. The news of such crime has been also posted in forms of pictures on Vadi-e Rahmat Cemetery Telegram Channel on September 11, 2017.

    As the Iran regime admitted, the construction project includes a total area of 4500 square meters. The procedures consist of excavating operations, rolling, leveling and fitting, pouring concrete, building walls, gridding, installing light pylons. Three companies and the Supervision of Tabriz Civil Engineering Department launched this project and the Cemetery Organization of Tabriz Municipality is the employer.

    As the satellite TV of the Iranian resistance, ‘Simay Azadi’ Channel released photos and videos on the destruction of graves, the Iranian regime also destroyed a MEK mass grave in Sowme’eh Sara, Gilan Province. One of the supporters of the MEK who visited this location, reports:

    “I went to the cemetery in which the MEK martyrs of the massacre of 1988 are buried. I took photos of the graves of townspeople but I could not find the graves of MEK martyrs. Nevertheless, I saw a mechanical excavator behind the cemetery amidst the tall trees where the MEK martyrs are buried. As the people said, this excavator is operating to make roads.”

    He added,” The cemetery of MEK martyrs is exactly located behind these tall trees, as the supporters of the MEK released pictures of this area. They are currently destroying the cemetery.” While a Justice Seeking movement is formed to try the perpetrators of the 1988 massacre of MEK and non MEK affiliates, the Iranian regime intends to eliminate the signs of such brutal crime.

    The Justice Seeking movement calls for the disclosure of secrets about the 1988 massacre, therefore, the perpetrators have to answer the following questions:

    1. The full name of MEK and non MEK affiliates who were executed.

    2. How many MEK and non MEK affiliates were killed in each city and province?

    3. The mothers of those executed shall know where their loved ones are buried and where the address of mass graves is.

    4. At the end, if these criminals are proud of such crime against the humanity, then why do not they reveal the names of the members of death committees in different provinces?

    It is noteworthy that in June this year a Call for urgent action to prevent destruction of 1988 massacre (mainly MEK members and sympathizers) evidence was made by Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran in which it stated:

    During the past few days the mullahs’ regime in the city of Tabriz, northwest Iran, has begun a campaign of vandalizing graves of members of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) executed back in the 1980s, especially those massacred during the summer of 1988. These now destroyed graves were in the Rahmat Valley Cemetery. To this point the graves of 75 MEK martyrs, including Akbar Choopani and Soraya Abolfat’hi, who was executed while pregnant, have been vandalized.

    Iranian intelligence has supervised measures placing 10 centimeters of cement and leveling the grounds in the cemetery to destroy all evidence of such a martyrs’ cemetery. They have also placed a sign reading, “Leveling the children’s block” and installed a number of gravestones in the area where the cement has been poured, to prevent any sign of the gravesite destruction. Attached images provide signs of the machinery used, the vandalized gravestone, and various phases of cement pouring and the placing of new gravestones.

    Last month in Mashhad, northeast Iran, mass graves of PMOI/MEK martyrs in the Beheshte Reza cemetery were also vandalized.

    In the city of Ahvaz, southwest Iran, city authorities have been widening a road near a cemetery in order to vandalize martyrs’ graves. Signs of tumbled bodies in a mass grave previously covered with cement were seen as the digging began in the area of phase 2 of Padadshahr and the Bankdar Boulevard in this city. Authorities quickly covered the mass grave with dirt and continued to widen the road.

    The Iranian Resistance calls on all international human rights organizations, especially the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Special Rapporteur of the Human Rights Situation in Iran to condemn this inhumane act and take urgent action to prevent the destruction of such evidence of previous mass executions and massacre of political prisoners mainly MEK members, especially those of 1988. Iran’s ruling dictators must face justice for their crimes against humanity and 120,000 political executions.

    Source: Iran Regime Destroys the Graves of the Martyrs of PMOI/MEK Killed in the 1988 Massacre

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 1:33 pm on September 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , The People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran,   

    After Her Election as PMOI/MEK Secretary General, Zahra Merrikhi Pledges to Bring Freedom to Iran 

    PMOI-2

    Maryam Rajavi: This election will break the spell of repression and heralds the overthrow of the mullahs’ religious fascism

    The People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran, PMOI, (the Mujahedin-e Khalq, MEK) held its annual Congress simultaneously in Tirana and five other countries. On the PMOI’s 52nd anniversary, the Congress elected Ms. Zahra Merrikhi as its new Secretary General. Ms. Zohreh Akhyani, the Secretary General since 2011, chaired the Congress.

    According to the PMOI’s bylaws, the Secretary General is elected to a renewable term of two years. The election is held in three phases. In the first phase, members of the PMOI Central Council, and in the second the organization’s officials and cadres in different departments, cast their votes in secret ballots. In the third phase, at the PMOI Congress, all members vote by raising their hands.

    In the first phase, on August 20, 2017, Ms. Merrikhi was elected from among 12 candidates by a majority of the Central Council members. The four leading candidates were put on the ballot for the second phase, which was held on September 3, 2017. Ms. Merrikhi received a majority of the votes cast in ten different PMOI centers. In the final phase, during the PMOI Congress, Ms. Merrikhi was unanimously elected Secretary General.

    Previously, Ms. Merrikhi was coordinator for the offices of Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, the President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), and Vice-President of the PMOI’s Central Council.

    Born in 1959 in the city of Qa’emshahr in the northern Province of Mazandaran, Ms. Merrikhi became acquainted with the PMOI during the 1979 anti-Monarchic Revolution and joined the PMOI after the Shah’s overthrow. She was soon appointed head of the women’s section in Qa’emshahr, and later became a member of the editorial board of the PMOI publication in Mazandaran, called Talavang.

    In 1981, she was transferred to Tehran and acted as liaison between the PMOI and its branches in the forests of northern Iran. In 1984, she moved to PMOI bases in the border region with Iraq, and a year later became a member of the Central Council.

    Her younger brother, Ali Merrikhi, was murdered by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) in 1988.

    Ms. Merrikhi oversaw PMOI branches in Scandinavia and Germany for some time. In 1991, she became a member of the Executive Committee and was later appointed head of Radio Mojahed, Simay-e Moghavemat (the Iranian Resistance’s television network) and the publication Mojahed.

    She became a member of the NCRI in 1992 and was appointed Chairwoman of the Public Affairs Committee.

    Ms. Merrikhi had been the coordinator of the offices of Mrs. Rajavii since 2003 and the Vice-president of the PMOI’s Central Council since 2004.

    Following her election as Secretary General, Mrs. Merrikhi was sworn in, placing her hand on the Holy Quran and paying her respects to the Iranian flag and PMOI emblem. She pledged to remain faithful to the enormous responsibilities with which she has been entrusted. Ms. Merrikhi vowed to devote all her abilities and those of the PMOI as a national treasure of the Iranian people, to establish freedom and democracy in Iran.

    The new Secretary General expressed her appreciation for the efforts of her predecessor, Ms. Akhyani, and Ms. Mojgan Parsai, the President of the PMOI’s Central Council. She lauded their efforts and those of other PMOI officials over the past 14 years, during one of the most dangerous and tortuous periods of the Organizations history in camps Ashraf and Liberty.

    “Today, the PMOI, with the help of the Iranian people, is prepared as never before to overthrow the clerical regime,” Ms. Merrikhi said, adding that the PMOI has now 18 co-Secretaries General (including seven former Secretaries General). Ms. Merrikhi also introduced Narges Azodanlou, 36, Rabi’eh Mofidi, 35, and Nasrin Massih, 39, as new deputies to the Secretary General.

    In congratulating the election of Ms. Merrikhi as the new PMOI Secretary General, Mrs. Rajavi described it as a brilliant election, embodying the height of democracy, cohesion, and growth in the PMOI. It heralds the breaking of the spell of repression which will lead to the overthrow of the religious fascism ruling Iran, she added.

    The People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran
    September 6, 2017

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:17 am on September 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    The 52nd Founding Anniversary of The People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran 

    52pmoi

    The 52nd Founding Anniversary of The People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:20 am on August 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Fatemeh Amini, , , , The People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran,   

    Fatemeh Amini, Symbol of perseverance and steadfastness 

    fatemeh_amini_eng

    There are people who make up cornerstones on which a long history of resistance is built for millions to follow.

    There are grim wills that make the enemy fall on its knees and overcome its cruelty and savagery.

    There are humans that look on to the horizons, calmly sing the beautiful song of life and then become eternal.

    Fatemeh Amini was one such human being.Fatemeh Amine 1

    Fatemeh was born in the city of Mashhad (northeastern Iran) to a religious family who were political and progressive. She, too, started her political activities against the Shah’s dictatorship in 1962 when she was studying at Mashhad University’s School of Literature. Soon, she and her friends founded the Association of Progressive Women.

    Fatemeh graduated from university in 1964 and began teaching in girls’ high schools in Mashhad. At the same time, she tried to familiarize them with social and political issues.

    In 1970, Fatemeh moved to Tehran where she got to know the newly founded People’s Mojahedin of Iran (PMOI), and after a short period of active involvement, she became a member of the group.

    In 1971, the Shah’s secret police (SAVAK) launched a major campaign to discover and clampdown on dissident groups, including the PMOI. A large number of the group members were arrested and imprisoned.

    In the very difficult conditions that ensued, Fatemeh secretly but persistently continued her activities. However, she was also arrested in March 1975.

    To have an open hand in torturing her, SAVAK had a news published in the daily newspapers indicating that Fatemeh Amini had been found dead after falling from a mountain.

    So, Fatemeh was flogged and tortured for days and months until she was paralyzed, but she put up a staunch resistance and did not give any information to SAVAK.

    Finally, she was killed under torture on August 16, 1975.

    Fatemeh Amini was the first PMOI woman to be killed in struggle, but she did not die as thousands of young women followed her example in the subsequent years.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:57 pm on August 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    For What Crime 30000 Political Prisoners Have Been Killed on the Summer 1988 in Iran? 

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 3:47 pm on August 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , The People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran   

    MEK supporters in Iran step up campaigning for justice over 1988 massacre 

    Supporters of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI or MEK) inside Iran have filmed themselves carrying out brave acts of openly demanding justice over the 1988 massacre of more than 30,000 political prisoners in Iran.
    The scenes filmed in various Iranian cities in July 2017 show brave Iranians hoisting banners and distributing fliers about the massacre and calling on the United Nations to launch an independent inquiry and to prosecute the perpetrators of this great crime against humanity.
    On the basis of a fatwa by the regime’s Supreme Leader Khomeini in the summer of 1988, more than 30,000 political prisoners were mass executed for refusing to renounce their political beliefs. The overwhelming majority were member of the main Iranian opposition group, the PMOI (MEK).
    Young Iranian activists across the country have in recent weeks stepped up their defiant public campaigning for justice over the 1988 massacre.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:53 am on August 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , The People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran   

    A campaign to prosecute those involved in the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran 

    The activities of the supporters of the People's Mojahedin in Iran

    The activities of the supporters of the People’s Mojahedin in Iran

    IRAN: 06 August 2017– Activities of the supporters of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) have shaken the murderous regime of Iranian mullahs after Maryam Rajavi, the president-elect of the NCRI sent a message on the anniversary of the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran, known as the Justice Seeking Movement. MEK activists in different cities in Iran distributed posters and written slogans in the Greater Tehran and other cities including; Hamedan, Mashhad, Yazd, Shahsavar, Shahr-e Ray, Ilam, Shiraz, Maragheh and Arak.

    The above video has been shot in the suburbs of Hamedan. The activists have covered their faces to protect their identity fearing arrest and torture by the Iranian regime.

    The video also contains activities of other supporters of the MEK in other Iranian cities.

    Tehran - The movement of the prosecution in the Sheikh Fazlallah Expressway

        Tehran – The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Sheikh Fazlallah Highway

    The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the

       Tehran – The Justice Seeking Movement activities on Simorgh Avenue

    The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Jihad Park

    Tehran – The Justice Seeking Movement activities in  Jihad Park

    Tehran-The movement of the prosecution- The Nahjul Balaghe Park

    TehranThe Justice Seeking Movement activities in Nahjul Balaghe Park

    The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Hakim Highway

    TehranThe Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Hakim Highway

    Tehran-The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Shahrara

    TehranThe Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Shahrara

    Tehran-The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Alley Ferdusi

    TehranThe Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Ferdusi Rd.

    Tehran-The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Khavaran

    TehranThe Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Khavaran

    Tehran-The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Shaykh Fazl  Allah

      TehranThe Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Shaykh Fazl Allah

     Tehran-The Justice Seeking Movement activities

    TehranThe Justice Seeking Movement activities

    Shiraz -The Justice Seeking Movement activities
        Shiraz After the terrorist designation of the IRGC, comes the justice for  victims of the 1988 massacre in Iran
       Shahr-e ray-The Justice Seeking Movement activities

     Shahr-e rayDown with the regime of the mullahs

    Hamedan -The Justice Seeking Movement  activities

    Hamedan –Onward for the overthrow of the mullahs regime in Iran

    Hamedan    The Justice Seeking Movement  activities in the  Luna Park

    Hamedan –   The Justice Seeking Movement  activities in the  Luna Park

    Maragheh The Justice Seeking Movement  activities   in the  Luna Park

     Maragheh- The Justice Seeking Movement activities in the Luna Park

    Yazd  - The Justice Seeking Movement  activities

     Yazd   Perpetrators of the 1988 massacre of pol. prisoners in Iran must be prosecuted  

    Tehran-The Justice Seeking Movement  activities
        TehranMaryam Rajavi holds the book of the names of 20,000 martyrs in Iran 
    Yazd  – The Justice Seeking Movement  activities  in the   Mother Park

     Arak   The Justice Seeking Movement  activities in the Mother Park

      Eelam  - The Justice Seeking Movement  activities
        Ilam   Perpetrators of the 1988 massacre of pol. prisoners in Iran must be prosecuted
    Tehran-The Justice Seeking Movement  activities
        Tehran– Down with the murderous regime of the mullahs in Iran   

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:03 am on August 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , The People's Mojahedin Organization of Iran   

    Those who met their appointment with Freedom 

    30,000 red roses

    On the anniversary of the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran

    The 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners in Iran

    has been described as the worst crime against humanity since World War II. [1]

    28 years after this genocide, the Iranian regime still refuses to acknowledge the executions, or provide any information as to how many prisoners were killed.

    Based on eyewitness accounts of survivors, the massacre had been prepared for from at least a year before. The order for the massacre came from Khomeini directly in the form of a religious decree (fatwa), calling for the execution of all who remained steadfast in their support for the opposition People’s Mojahedin of Iran.[2]

    A so-called Amnesty Commission (better known among prisoners as the Death Commission) asked a simple question from every prisoner: do you still support the PMOI/MEK? Those who answered yes were executed, even if they had already finished serving their original sentence.[3] None of the victims had any new activities while in detention and many of them were 15 or 16 years of age at the time of original arrest and prosecution.

    The executions started in the last week of July, peaking on July 28 until August 14, and continuing onto autumn and even the following year in some places.

    Naturally, the vast majority of the victims were members and supporters of the PMOI/MEK, but the order extended to other groups in later stages.

    Prisoners were hanged in groups, sometimes 10 to 15 at a time, and later transported out of prison by dump trucks, and buried in unmarked mass graves. There was no mercy on anyone, even young girls and pregnant women.

    Khomeini’s haste to execute was so abhorrent many of his closest confidantes had doubts about it. Hossein Ali Montazeri, Khomeini’s heir apparent and the country’s second highest authority at the time, urged for leniency and a slowdown.[4]

    In a book of memoirs published in December 2000, Montazeri pointed out the vicious tortures practiced especially against young girls and women before execution during the 1988 massacre.

    In a famous letter to Khomeini which led to his ouster, Montazeri wrote, “If you probably insist on your decision, at least order (the three-man Death Commission) to base their rulings on unanimous vote not that of the majority. And women should also be made exceptions, especially women who have children. And finally, the execution of several thousand people in several days will backfire.”

    From this letter we can understand the role and impact of women in the prisons of those days. They were firm and resilient and inspired resistance despite knowing the fact that they would have to go through the horrifying experience rape before being hanged. But they said NO to the executioners.

    It has been reported that 80 percent of PMOI women detained in the Women’s Ward 3 of Evin Prison had been massacred by September 1988. They included Monireh Rajavi, who had two small daughters and was executed only because she was the sister of the Iranian Resistance’s Leader Massoud Rajavi. There was also Ashraf Ahmadi, a political prisoner from the Shah’s time, with four children. The victims also included a wide range of people from various professions, including PMOI’s female candidates for parliamentary elections Fatemeh Zare’ii from Shiraz, and Zohreh Ainol-Yagheen from Isfahan. Dr. Hamideh Sayyahi and Dr. Shourangiz Karimian, along with her sister, and National Volleyball Team player Forouzan Abdi were among those executed in the 1988 massacre.

    An audio clip just recently released by Montazeri’s family on his website, also reveals dreadful details about the massacre of women. The tape recording from Mr. Montazeri’s meeting with members of the Death Commission, includes an example about the execution of a 15-year-old girl who had been taken to prison only two days before to break her resistant brother but since she did not denounce her executed brother, she was executed, as well.

    The tape also includes reference to the execution of a pregnant woman in Isfahan.

    The overall picture of the 1988 massacre is totally inadequate because the massacre was extensive, carried out in prisons all across the country. In some instances, there was not any survivor. The clerical regime dealt with every information regarding the massacre as top secret, not allowing any leaks.

    So, what is known about the massacre has been extracted and pieced together from the limited number of reports by survivors and families who were called to collect the bodies of their loved ones,[5] as well as from scattered acknowledgments made by the regime’s former officials as noted in this article.

    The other side of this crime against humanity is of course, the steadfastness of a generation of prisoners who did not buckle under the threat of death and defended their identity which was akin to their nation’s freedom. They thus sealed their nation’s right to freedom of choice and thought, and turned this great crime against humanity into an epical humane epitome of human grace and grit which makes every conscientious human being humble before its magnificence.

    The Iranian Resistance has renewed its call for the international prosecution of all perpetrators of the 1988 massacre and crime against humanity in Iran, who are still in power and hold important positions of authority. They include Khamenei (then President under Khomeini), Rafsanjani (then acting Commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces), Rouhani (then assistant to the acting Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces), and members of the death commission, Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi (Minister of Justice under Hassan Rouhani), Hossein-Ali Nayyeri (head of the Supreme Disciplinary Court for Judges under Rouhani), Morteza Eshraqi (then Prosecutor), and Ebrahim Raeesi (one of the top clerics, member of the Assembly of Experts, and Khamenei’s appointed head of Astan Qods-e Razavi foundation, which is an important political and economic powerhouses funding the regime’s war efforts).

    [1] A former Intelligence Ministry deputy recorded a video clip in 2008, in which he revealed that the clerical regime had massacred some 33,700 political prisoners and buried them in mass graves. According to Reza Malek, there are between 170 to 190 mass graves across the country.

    [2] “Whoever at any stage continues to belong to the (PMOI/MEK) must be executed,” Khomeini’s fatwa read.

    [3] Khomeini assigned a three-member so-called “Amnesty Commission”, who held summary trials and actually interrogated prisoners to determine their fate.

    The questions were focused on whether the inmate continued to have any allegiances to the PMOI/MEK. If the prisoners were not willing to fully collaborate with the regime against the PMOI/MEK, it was viewed as a sign of sympathy to the organization and the sentence was immediate execution.

    [4] Montazeri was ousted and placed under house arrest until his death in 2009, for his protests against the massacre.   

    [5] A report from Shiraz indicated: “When we the rumors of the massacres spread among the public, we referred to the prison. Executioners told us, ‘What did you expect, that we serve you sweets and candies? We killed 860 people at once in one day! Now, if you hold a funeral, we will raze down your house as well.’ “

     
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