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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:30 pm on 9 May 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Terrorism   

    Target Iran’s nuclear/terrorism threats for regime change 

    Iranian missile program, a menace to the security of the region

    Iranian missile program, a menace to the security of the region

    PMOI/MEK staff writer

    May 9, 2018 – Following the United State’s decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal and fully impose powerful economic against Tehran, there will be an increase in discussions on the path forward from here.

    If the Middle East is to experience anything resembling peace, democracy, stability, and security, it is an inarguable necessity to first realize democratic change and end the mullahs’ rule in Iran.

    Tehran has taken advantage of several decades of appeasement, resulting in the suffering of the Iranian people and nations across the region. The history of billions flowing into Iranian regime bank accounts and pallets of cash flown into this country must come to an end.

    Iran’s sinister regime, understanding no language but the language of a firm and definitive policy, is beginning to see the end of a long and fruitful journey at the expense of many others.

    Tehran, being the world’s central banker of international terrorism, “has funded its long reign of terror by plundering the wealth of its own people,” according to U.S. President Donald Trump’s speech.

    It is worth noting how the Iranian opposition coalition National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), of which the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) is a member of, first blew the whistle back in 2002 on Iran’s clandestine nuclear program, highly suspicious of seeking nuclear weapons.

    Such an industrial scale effort is meaningless for a country sitting on an ocean of oil and natural gas. Especially when such a multi-billion dollar project is depriving millions of people struggling with poverty across the country.

    “Eradicating the clerical regime’s nuclear and terrorism threats means getting rid of the regime in its entirety. A regime based on the principle of Velayat-e faqih (absolute rule of the clergy) cannot exist without terrorism, suppression, and weapons of mass destruction,” said NCRIPresident Maryam Rajavi following the US decision.

    All banks and companies currently doing business with Iran are finding it extremely difficult to continue their endeavors. It is quite obvious that Iran’s $450 billion economy is no choice in the face of the U.S. $44 trillion economy.

    It is also a moral decision placed before everyone from all walks of life in the international community: to continue seeking short-term economic interests with Iran’s regime, or finally deciding to stand with the Iranian people in their quest for freedom, democracy, and human rights.

    Iran’s regime must also be stopped in its treks of warmongering, export of fundamentalism and terrorism, as explained by Mrs. Rajvi. It is quite interesting how standing alongside the Iranian people will actually further the long-term interests of the very parties currently appeasing the Iranian regime and only seeking short-term interests.

    Such a policy will also prevent Iran from launching a new war and bring an end to the ongoing wars already causing havoc across the region.

    The Iranian people proved once again in December and January how they seek liberation from the oppressive rulers sitting on the throne in Tehran.

    Democratic change is coming to Iran and each and every member of the international community must decide sooner or later where they stand on this very dire matter.

    As a necessity, the United Nations Security Council should take this opportunity and launch the global effort focusing on Iran’s long forgone human rights dossier, parallel to holding this regime accountable for its meddling throughout the Middle East and beyond, and advancing a dangerous ballistic missile program.

    Countless crimes have been committed by the Iranian regime inside the country and abroad. Steps are being taken against Tehran. More needs to be done and the Iranian regime must be held to the ropes until all those responsible for these crimes are placed before justice.

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  • Masoud Dalvand 11:01 am on 4 Mar 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Houthis, , , Terrorism,   

    Iran Regime Lies About Arming Houthis 

    The Iranian Regime is once again lying about its involvement in the Yemeni war, which has caused thousands of deaths and triggered a humanitarian crisis; just days after Russia vetoed a UN Security Council resolution that would have condemned Iran for supplying the Yemeni Houthis with weapons and missiles, in violation of an arms embargo.

    Bahram Qassemi, a spokesman for the Iranian Foreign Ministry, outright denied that Iran sent weapons to Yemen and accused the UK of “dishonest behaviour” for drafting the resolution.

    He said: “We don’t send weapons to Yemen. Such allegations and attempts are made to project the blame on others by those who want to use the existing situation against Iran. We are witnessing a [sic] dishonest behaviour from the British government that uses the international mechanisms to defend the aggressor despite its slogans about a peaceful settlement of the Yemen crisis.”

    He went on to claim that the situation in Yemen “is the result of the export of British and American arms”, but it is notable that UN experts have completed a report that found Iran was supplying military aid to the Houthis.

    It’s not a coincidence that these comments came just days after General Joseph Votel, head of the US Central Command in the Middle East, told the House Armed Services Committee that Iran was trying to turn Yemen into a client state, as it did with Lebanon, but in a much shorter timeframe.

    Votel said: “Iran has extended its tentacles across the region through numerous proxies, including Lebanese Hezbollah operating in multiple countries, hardline Iranian-backed Shia militia groups (SMGs) in Iraq and Syria, and Iranian support has enabled the Houthis.”

    This is not surprising when you listen to the recent comments of Ali Akbar Velayati, a foreign policy adviser to Iran’s supreme leader Ali Khamenei.

    Velayati said: “Our presence in the region is inevitable. We will continue this process, so as to become the most decisive force in the region. We are present in Iraq, Syria, Palestine, and Lebanon…We help Yemen because it is our human duty to do so. Saudi Arabia must know that this ongoing process will make Yemen its Vietnam.”

    In this, Velayati is admitting that Iran deceives its enemies, when others claim that they are not building a coalition of Shiite forces in Syria and Iraq, and that Iran’s goal in aiding the Houthis is not aiding Yemen but hurting Saudi Arabia.

    Iran is gaining military dominance in Yemen in the same way that it did in Iraq, which makes it easy to see why the Houthis blocked a 2016 peace deal and why Iran is interfering in Iraq’s upcoming elections.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:50 pm on 25 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Hamas, , , , , Terrorism   

    “Axis of Resistance” Encompasses Iran, Hezbollah, Syria, and Hamas 

    INU – When President George W. Bush gave his 2002 State of the Union address, he used the now-famous term, ”Axis of Evil” that warning against the development of weapons of mass destruction by the countries of North Korea, Iran and Iraq.

    In 2010, the term “Axis of Resistance” was adopted to encompass the forces of Iran, Hezbollah, Bashar Assad’s Syria, and Hamas.

    After the February 10th downing of an Iranian drone, and the loss of an Israeli F-16 following Israeli strikes against Syria, the media mentioned the “Axis of Resistance” phrase, but did not discuss its meaning or motivation in depth.

    In an article for the US News and World Report by Lamont Colucci, associate professor of politics and government at Ripon College, and senior fellow in National Security Affairs for the American Foreign Policy Council, writes, “Iran has mobilized its own forces, its proxies and Syrian services to create a powerful network to threaten Israeli security. Iran and Syria have been instrumental in transferring greater amounts and more sophisticated weaponry to Hezbollah, utilizing the fighting in Syria as a real-world training ground for future conflicts. The world was so mono-focused on the Islamic State group and the Syrian civil war that it continued to ignore Iranian strategic moves and intentions that go well beyond an Assad victory. In fact, we may come to view the Syrian Civil War as merely phase one of an overall Iranian plan to dominate the Middle East and wage war against Israel, culminating in an attempt to blunt or even drive out the American presence from much of the region.”

    Iran would like to gain access to the Mediterranean, and the new axis could become powerful enough to intimidate American allies in the region to retract support for American foreign policy goals.

    Colucci adds, “The ‘Axis of Resistance’ poses a direct threat to the national interests of the United States and should be treated as a fundamental priority. It has no place in the international arena, and the movements and regimes that are its supporters are by definition illegitimate. In the past, the United States allowed Syria to dominate Lebanon; it now needs to decide if it is acceptable for Iran to dominate Syria, coerce Iraq and wage war against Israel.” He calls out this axis, “worshiping at the altar of tyranny, conquest and theocracy,” as “evil”.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:24 pm on 22 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , Terrorism,   

    Iranian Expansionism Destroying the Middle East 

    The aggressive expansionism of the Iranian Regime has caused violence and divisions across the Middle East, while their efforts to create regional proxy militias are worsening the situation in three already unstable countries: Syria, Yemen, and Iraq.

    It is well known that there are numerous Iran-backed Shiite militia groups fighting in Syria for the Assad regime, but some of these groups, like the Hashd Shaabi or Popular Mobilization Forces, are also working in Iraq to hamper peace and stability.

    In December, five Christian protesters were shot and injured by members of the Hashd al-Shaabi militia in Bartala, northern Iraq, while protesting as part of a larger group about assaults on Christians by the Shia militia.

    Captain Agathon Saleh said: “Many Christians are angry with practices of the Hashd al-Shaabi militia and consider them a continuation of violations committed by the Daesh terrorist group.”

    In Yemen, Shiite Houthi militia routinely attacks Yemeni government forces and civilians.

    Just last week, the Iran-backed Houthis kidnapped 300 people, mainly the elderly and children, in the town of Adeen. As it came so soon after the death of Houthi commander Abu Abdulrahman Al-Alwi, it is thought that this may have been retaliation.

    Yemen’s civil war began in 2014, when the Houthis took over the capital Sanaa and many other cities, forcing the internationally recognized government to flee to Saudi Arabia.

    However, it is in Syria where people have been most affected by Iran’s destabilization campaign as Iran-backed militias attack civilians and moderate opposition groups.

    Roughly 18,000 Shiite militiamen are said to fighting in Syria for the Bashar Assad regime, in a civil war that began in 2011 and many of them were recruited by the Iranian Regime or one of its proxies. This includes:

    • 10,000 Hezbollah fighters, who Iran deployed there from Lebanon

    • 5,000 fighters from Iraq’s Shiite areas, like Baghdad, Najaf, and Basra

    • 2,000 fighters from the Afghan Fatimiyun Brigade, who fight in the south of Aleppo, Damascus and Daraa

    • 500 fighters from the Pakistani Zaynabiyyun Brigades, who are fighting in the north of Aleppo

    On top of this, the Assad regime is using Iran-backed militia groups (or shabiha) to bolster its forces against the Syrian opposition. The 24,000-strong shabiha has been blamed for the killing of many anti-Assad protesters.

    The shabiha, believe to be funded by regime supporters including Assad’s cousin Rami Makhlouf, began to replace soldiers that deserted the Syrian army during the first year of the civil war, and their numbers increased dramatically as the Assad regime started losing power.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:17 pm on 16 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Terrorism   

    How The World Views Iran’s Role In Syria 

    By Heshmat Alavi

    As protests across Iran experience a variety of ups and downs following a major surge early this year, a wide array of analysts are seen writing about this important country’s domestic and foreign developments.

    More recently, concerns for Tehran are also increasing abroad as its international isolation begins to take its toll.

    To stand alongside the Iranian people, the international community must raise the cost of Tehran’s belligerence.

    In a piece some time ago I discussed How Iran Is Losing Europe, especially taking into consideration the distancing of France from Iran and President Emmanuelle Macron’s improving relations with the United States.

    Considering the fact that Iran’s economy is in desperate need of business ties with large French firms, such developments have become increasingly concerning for the Iranian regime’s ruling elite.

    President Macron recently threatened military action against the Assad regime in Syria, widely known to be remaining in power thanks to the support of Iran and Russia.

    “France will strike” if the Syrian conflict witnesses the use of chemical weapons against civilians, being in violation of international treaties, according to Reuters.

    “On chemical weapons, I set a red line and I reaffirm that red line,” Macron added. “If we have proven evidence that chemical weapons proscribed in treaties are used, we will strike the place where they are made.”

    Last May Macron emphasized chemical weapons use would represent a “red line” crossing. Updating his position, Macron took advantage of last Friday’s telephone call with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin to weigh in grave concern over signs of chlorine bomb usage against civilians in Syria.

    In recent weeks, rescue workers and aid groups in Syria, and the U.S. government, have been accusing Damascus of repeatedly deploying chlorine gas as a chemical weapon against civilians in Ghouta and Idlib.

    This highly dangerous chemical substance, which Syria claims to possess legally for purposes such as water purification, can be lethal when used as a weapon and causes suffocation.

    The “Syrians for Truth and Justice” organization is reporting how missiles carrying poisonous gasses targeting Ghouta belonged to Iran:

    “According to Bellingcat, the munitions used in the February 1 attack are Improvised Rocket Assisted Munitions (IRAMs), based on modified Iranian 107mm rockets. The standard warhead has been replaced with a large pressurized gas cylinder, and tail fins have been added to the rocket.”

    Such developments go alongside further troubles brewing for Iran, emanating from strong remarks by other senior U.S. officials and figures.

    Daniel R. Coats, Director of National Intelligence at a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Tuesday:

    “Iran remains the most prominent state sponsor of terrorism, providing financial aid, advanced weapons and tactics, and direction to militant and terrorist groups across the Middle East and cultivating a network of operatives across the globe as a contingency to enable potential terrorist attacks.”

    In yet another reminder of Iran’s troubles regarding the controversial nuclear deal, known officially as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. John Bolton emphasized in a FOX News TV interview of only three months remaining to U.S. President Donald Trump’s deadline regarding a decision over the accord’s future.

    Promises were made Tehran would join the community of civilized nations as a result of this deal. The result, however, has been anything but.

    U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Wednesday renewed his government’s call on Iran to withdraw from Syria, accusing Tehran of destabilizing the Middle East through military presence.

    “Iran needs to withdraw its military, its militia from Syria, and allow a hope for the peace process to take hold in Geneva,” Tillerson emphasized at a news conference in Amman, the capital of Jordan.

    As argued extensively in the past, an interesting insight is now provided into how Washington can impose meaningful pressure on Tehran at a time when protesters are chanting for Iran’s regime to “Let go of Syria, think about us.”

    New York Post article reads in part:

    “Now is the time for Trump to re-establish a robust military deterrent toward Iranian expansionism in close collaboration with regional allies. His administration declared the Revolutionary Guard a terrorist entity in October, and he should target key Guards’ bases and weapons in Syria accordingly. Such an approach could help prevent a larger-scale conflict.”

    Iran understands how more money pumped abroad will flame their already crisis-riddled political status quo back home.

    Washington may particularly be focusing on also closing Iran’s “land bridge,” connecting Tehran to Damascus to easily influence the entire region and connect to the Mediterranean.

    Iran’s regime is very vulnerable following the recent uprising. Public unrest and the protesters’ demands for fundamental change are Tehran’s Achilles’ heel.

    Identifying and supporting the very element that can realize this change is crucial.

     

    via How The World Views Iran’s Role In Syria — Iran Commentary

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:45 pm on 13 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , Terrorism   

    How the Iranian Regime Is Waging a Proxy War in the Middle East 

    Slide4

    NCRI: The Iranian Regime has been merging its proxy groups across the Middle East with existing local defence forces in various countries, which become a part of that country’s army.

    This is evidenced in an April 2017 memo from the Syrian armed forces, which stated that the defense forces would replace the Iranian proxies eventually. This may lead you to believe that Iran is removing itself from the Syrian conflict, but this is simply untrue.

    They are removing their proxies to go to other places in the Middle East, but once the ideology has been spread, the local defense groups will become Iranian proxies themselves and can become far more influential if everybody thinks that the Iranian Regime is not involved.

    This tactic has been used by the Iranian Regime already in Iraq with the Popular Mobilization Forces (PMF) and Lebanon with Hezbollah, two groups that are now immensely in their respective countries and its political system. The Iranian Regime has deployed the PMF and Hezbollah to Syria and other areas of conflict and even used them to train terrorists.

    The groups are even known to work together, as a video of Qais al-Khazali, the leader of PMF affiliate Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq, at the Lebanese-Israeli border in December shows. In the video, Khazali states that he is there with Hezbollah to oppose Israel.

     

    This move doesn’t reduce the number of Iranian proxies involved in conflicts across the Middle East, but increases them. There are then more pro-Iran regional militias to help create Iran’s dream of a Shiite Crescent across the Middle East, which would make it easier to create more proxies by supporting more local defense forces.

    Through the Shiite Crescent, the Iranian proxies could spread across Europe and eventually across the world if they aren’t stopped.

    The Regime’s overall goal in creating more proxies is to export the Iranian Islamic ideology across the region and eventually the world, just as it already has done in Iraq and Lebanon.

    Iran regime's millitias

    Iran regime’s militias 

    Ahmed, a Hezbollah member, said that there are also Hezbollah factions in Syria and Iraq, which share the same ideology and regional goals.

    He said: “All of these factions in Iraq, Syria and Lebanon will fight side by side with each other in the next war.”

    That is a very worrying prospect for anyone concerned about Iranian aggression and expansionism, national sovereignty, peace in the Middle East, and extremist Islamic ideology.

    This is another reason that the Iranian Regime should not be allowed to reach its 40th anniversary in 2019

     

     

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:16 am on 8 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Terrorism, ,   

    How the Iranian Regime Is Using Its Proxy Groups and How the US Can Tackle Them 

    The Iranian Regime has a network of foreign proxy groups all across the Middle East, from large formal organizations like Hezbollah to small splinter groups like Asaib Ahl al-Haq. This means that Iranian influence is spreading further than ever before and is doing so in increasingly diverse ways. How can we stop them?

    At a Policy Forum at The Washington Institute on February 2, Hanin Ghaddar, the Institute’s Friedman Visiting Fellow and a veteran Lebanese journalist and researcher, spoke about the Iranian Regime’s control of Lebanon via Hezbollah and explained the political balance is a mere illusion in Lebanon because of Iran.

    He explained that because of Iran’s power over Hezbollah, the Regime has been able to build a land bridge across the Middle East through Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, which the mullahs will use to transport weapons, troops, and money to its terrorist proxies (including splinter groups) across the region, and expand its power even more.

    At that same forum, Phillip Smyth, a Soref Fellow at the Institute and a researcher at the University of Maryland, explained that if the US wished to tackle these Iranian-backed groups, they must recognise that they are all connected.
    Even though it may seem as if the groups are divided along religious or ethnic or political grounds, they are all reading from the Regime’s script. They are paid from the same coffers, following the same idealogy, and fightinging the same battles.

    Smyth said: “Understanding Iranian ideology will allow Washington to counter it more effectively. Iranian operatives know how to work with individuals and splinter groups, while U.S. policy tends to be more binary in determining allies and adversaries. Going forward, U.S. officials should learn how to better utilize religious networks in the region. They should also take advantage of the fact that Iran overestimates its influence in certain quarters, particularly within the Iraqi army.”

    Both speakers agreed that because of the speed that the Iranian Regime was recruiting fighters via their proxy groups, the fighters were no longer as loyal to the cause or as well trained, which was also a way to attack the Iranian Regime.

    Ghaddar said: “The United States can take several steps in response… In the short term, supporting anti-Iran and anti-Hezbollah candidates in the May elections could harden the line between the state and Hezbollah. In the longer term, Washington would be wise to draw red lines in Syria and stick to them.”

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:08 pm on 25 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Terrorism   

    Mullahs’ Regime in Crises Explosive Situation in Iran & Meddling in other Countries 

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:36 am on 24 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: AL-Qaeda, , , Terrorism   

    Iran Claims to Fight Terrorists While Helping Al-Qaeda Rebuild 

    For many of those around the worldAl-Qaeda is a name that brings up memories of lost loved ones, destruction, and terror. This has been a group that the international community has continually fought against in an effort to protect their peoples and cultures. Even Iran has claimed to fight terrorism, arguing that it has been part of the efforts to fight ISIS and other terrorist groups. However, it seems that the truth is coming to light about the regime’s activities. It is no surprise that instead of fighting terrorism, the Iranian regime may have been active in rebuilding one of the worst terrorist organizations, Al-Qaeda.

    In Syria, ISIS has been losing ground to both Syria and a U.S.-backed coalition force. While the group built its ideal statehood on rape, slavery, and execution, which seems to be nearing its end, Al-Qaeda has been flourishing. How is this possible? According to the Trump administration, Iran has made a pact with this terrorist organization and President Trump noted that this pact justified de-certifying the Iran nuclear deal (JCPOA).

    Osama bin Laden trove

    Last week, the CIA declassified a trove of documents from the 2011 raid that cost Osama bin Ladenhis life. This trove appears to confirm the relationship between Al-Qaeda and the Iranian regime. One of the details includes how Hamza, bin Laden’s son, took shelter in Iran, as well as about negotiations  between Al-Qaeda and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), which touched on funding and arming the Sunni terror group to strike American targets.

    Research reveals that Al-Qaeda and agents from the Iranian deep state first attempted to broker an agreement more than two decades ago. In the years since, members of Al-Qaeda have taken shelter in Iran and over the intervening period, rebuilt not only their leadership, but also the number of foot soldiers available to them.

    Iran-Al-Qaeda 01

    This relationship is not surprising to those in the intelligence communities who have known that the terrorist group and the Iranian regime have worked together at various points to spread their unique ideologies. Iran, although not always on the same page as Al-Qaeda, has never condemned the group or its actions throughout the years.

    Iranian Regime’s links to terrorism

    In fact, the regime has sheltered individuals from this terrorist group for years. At times, it appeared as if they were trying to cater favor with the United States by claiming they were willing to hand over those individuals from Al-Qaeda in Iran, although this never happened.

    The Regime also sheltered Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the founder of the Iraqi al-Qaeda, and groomed him using the IRGC. His group became the predecessor to ISIS, so the Iranian Regime’s links to terrorism are growing by the release of every document. This state sponsor of terrorism, Iran, has clearly shown that it is not only spreading its own fundamentalism through its militias, it is also using a known terrorist group to spread dissent within the global community.

    “Iran will deny any relations with Al-Qaeda. Interesting is how Iran initially denied any role in Syria and Iraq. The status quo proves Iran’s lethal footprint in literally opening the gates of hell upon these two nations. The Obama years are over. Al-Qaeda and ISIS have lost their organizational structure, after Iran took complete advantage of them. Iran and the IRGC, however, continue causing mayhem…Despite their differences, the European Union and the United States should join forces in the long overdue effort to end Iran’s footprint in Syria and Iraq,” said Heshmat Alavi, a human rights activist in a commentary in Al Arabiya.

    Ryan Trapani, a spokesman for the CIA, said: “Documents collected during the bin Laden raid, which have been declassified, indicate Iran and al-Qaeda have an agreement to not target each other. The documents indicate bin Laden referred to Iran as the ‘main artery‘ for al-Qaeda to move funds, personnel and communications.”

    Last month, Donald Trump noted that Iranian proxies had provided training to al Qaeda operatives involved in the bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998.

    In the same speech, he revealed that Iran had indeed sheltered al Qaeda after 9/11, and was quickly pounced upon by, among others, Paul Pillar, the former senior intelligence analyst who signed off on the conclusions that Iraq had WMDs.

    This new release of information clearly demonstrates that the regime is not to be trusted, as it continues to play both ends in an attempt to protect itself. During the bargaining with the U.S. in the early 2000s, it is clear that the regime would have handed over the members of Al-Qaeda for the destruction of the MEK/PMOI. For the mullahs, the only thing worth protecting is their own power and control over the Iranian people, by whatever means are available to them at the time.

    via Iran Claims to Fight Terrorists While Helping Al-Qaeda Rebuild -The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:53 am on 21 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Terrorism, ,   

    US New Iran Policy 

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – Following the release of the National Security Strategy, the U.S. is putting the Iranian Regime in its crosshairs for its support of extremism in the Middle East.

    The Donald Trump administration has made it increasingly clear that Iranian regime’s destructive policies will no longer be overlooked by the US and it is now putting their words into action.

    Terrorism

    The US has long considered Iran the world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism but now that the threat posed by ISIS is waning, the West can finally deal with the ‘godfather’ of Islamic terrorism directly.

    Just last week, Nikki Haley, the US Ambassador to the United Nations, explained that the Iranian Regime has supplied ballistic weapons to the Houthis in Yemen in order to attack Saudi Arabia and destabilise the region.

    She said: “We are not just focused on the nuclear programme. We’re also taking a hard look at Iran’s ballistic missile program, its arms exports, and its support for terrorists, proxy fighters and dictators.”

    She explained how the Iranian Regime is essentially the facilitator of malign activities across the Arab world.

    She said: “It’s hard to find a terrorist group in the Middle East that does not have Iran’s fingerprints all over it.[This regime is] fanning the flames” of conflict.”

    Meddling

    It is well known that the Iranian Regime is constantly meddling in the affairs of neighbouring states- like Iraq, Syria, and Yemen- and using their destabilisation to its advantage.

    Douglas Silliman, the US Ambassador to Iraq, said: “Iran simply does not respect the sovereignty of its neighbours.”

    Iraq is now seeking to distance itself from Iran and establish stronger ties with Riyadh and Amman, but the problem is still prominent in other Middle Eastern countries, which could mean a US intervention is necessary.

    There are currently over 2,000 American troops stationed in Syria to fight ISIS and US Defense Secretary James Mattis has indicated that they will remain there for the time being to deter other Iranian proxies from making tracks in the country.

    Reaction

    Some have accused the Trump administration of setting the stage for all-out war with Iran rather than attempting diplomatic measures but diplomatic measures aren’t working.

    Human rights activist Heshmat Alavi wrote on Al Arabiya: “[The accusers’] intentions are far from preventing the US from entering a new war, but to protect Tehran from any strong measures, including international sanctions that target the regime and actually benefit the people by weakening the ruling system.”

    Alavi is by no means calling for war with Iran- he cites that with the level of unprecedented infighting between Iran factions, drop in revenue for the country, and international sanctions, war will not be necessary to bring down the Regime. He advises decisive action- like crippling sanctions- to strike a death blow to the Regime.

    This is also the position of the Iranian opposition group, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), who first revealed Iran’s clandestine nuclear programme.

    The NCRI advises:

    • Imposing wide-ranging sanctions on Iran and their Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) and removing access to the global banking system

    • Evicting the IRGC and its proxy militias from Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and Afghanistan

    • Preventing the transfer of weaponry and troops from Iran to these countries

    • Referring the Iranian Regime to the International Criminal Court for its human rights violations- especially the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners- and holding those responsible to account

    • Imposing previous UN Security Council resolutions covering Iran’s nuclear weapons program, banning uranium enrichment, and launching unconditional inspections into the regime’s military and non-military sites

     
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