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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:20 am on 11 Jul 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran Economy, , Petrochemical Industry, Sanctions,   

    Iran’s petrochemical industry fueling the regime’s terrorism drive 

    Iran’s petrochemical industry; The terrorism cash cow

    Following U.S. sanctions against the Iranian regime’s largest and most profitable petrochemical companies for their connections with the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC), al-Hayat daily cited revelations made by the Iranian opposition coalition National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI).

    “Petrochemical industry serving IRGC terrorism and Iranian intelligence” is the title of a June 9 al-Hayat article citing NCRI revelations. The Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS) is the mullahs’ main intel/spying apparatus.

    “The NCRI, long calling for a full oil and arms embargo on Iran, says Tehran relies on profits from its oil and petrochemical product sales to financially fuel its terrorism and warmongering. The petrochemical branch consists of numerous companies working to provide the regime’s annual budget. The large majority of the petrochemical industry is under the control of Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC). Various petrochemical experts inside Iran are estimating that 90 percent of the petrochemical industry is controlled by Khamenei himself.

    The “Setad Ejraiye Farmane Hazrate Emam” – Headquarters for Executing the Order of the Imam – is active under Khamenei’s direct supervision. From 1999 forward, [Iran] established a firm by the name of the Tadbir Economic Development Group, consisting of a large number of petrochemical companies and has control over a large portion of Iran’s petrochemical industry.

    The Persian Gulf Petrochemical Company is known as Iran’s largest petrochemical complex and the most profitable. This company is in charge of providing the funding necessary to the IRGC’s financial arm, known as Fort Khatam. This is the largest IRGC financial institution.

    The Persian Gulf Petrochemical Company is the largest holding company in Iran, consisting of 15 petrochemical firms. This company was launched back in 1991 under a different name and as a subsidiary of the National Iranian Petrochemical Company. According to a 2009 Majlis (parliament) resolution, the Persian Gulf Petrochemical Company, receiving shares of other petrochemical companies, became a holding firm controlling around 40 percent of the country’s petrochemical industry.

    Iraq was the endpoint of a large portion of Iran’s ordered petrochemical products in 2018 while transportation documents cite Turkey or other countries. This allows Iranian regime exporters to claim exports to Iraq were in the Iranian currency, the rial, and transfer only a portion of the profits to Iran in rials, while the main profits are held in foreign banks and used to fuel Tehran’s terrorism drive.

    Al-Hayat also published a list of petrochemical companies and groups active under Khamenei and the IRGC. These companies were previously unveiled by the NCRI.

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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:56 am on 4 Jul 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Sanctions,   

    The true answer to the Iranian regime’s belligerence is more sanctions 

    By Masoud Dalvand

    After withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), in May 2018, the U.S. imposed sanctions on the Iranian regime’s commercial, banking, and oil sectors on several reprises in order to block financials sources that the regime uses for development of missile and nuclear programs, increase terrorist activities and destabilize other countries.

    The newest sanctions, announced on Monday, June 24, are against Iran regime’s supreme leader Ali Khamenei and his office. The supreme leader in Iran has unlimited power in all matters, and he oversees a huge financial empire that is the source of widespread economic corruption in Iran. 

    A quick review of the regime’s functions in the past four decades clearly show that increasing sanctions is true answer to this regime’s belligerent behavior.

    In the four decades that the mullahs have been ruling in Iran, they have maintained their hold on power through terror, horror and executions. Intervention in other countries started very soon after the 1979 revolution, branded as the export of the “Islamic Revolution.” The mullahs needed to spread and export their extremist religious ideology to ensure their survival. The idea of Velayat-e-Faqih (rule of the mullah), on which the mullahs’ regime is founded, aims to establish a global dictatorship. 

    Here are some examples of the regime’s crimes:

    • The bombing of the barracks of U.S. Marines in Beirut, Lebanon, in 1983 and the bombing of the Khobar towers in Saudi Arabia in the mid-90s, and many other bombings and terrorist attacks in other countries of the world, including the bombing of the Jewish community in Argentina in 1994.
    • Terrorist attacks against members and supporters of the Iranian opposition across the world. The most recent example was a failed bombing plot in Paris, France, in 2018 against the yearly convention of the Iranian resistance. The attack was planned by the diplomats of the regime in Europe. Other recent terrorist and espionage plots against the Iranian resistance took place in Albania and the U.S.
    • Abduction and hostage-taking of foreign nationals and using them as bargaining chips to put pressure on their countries of origin. This practice continues to this day.
    • Creation and support of proxy terrorist groups in the Middle East such the Lebanese Hezbollah, the Popular Mobilization Forces in Iraq and the Houthis in Yemen.
    • Violent intervention in Syria in support of the criminal dictator Bashar al-Assad. The Iranian regime sends weapons, ammunition and forces from the IRGC and terrorist Quds force to prop up the Assad regime against democratic opposition forces.
    • A costly nuclear weapons program, which started in the early 90s and absorbed billions of dollars from the assets and wealth of the country. This was one of the most destructive projects and policies of the regime. The MEK exposed the mullahs’ illicit nuclear program in 2002. Had it not been for the efforts of the Iranian resistance, the world would have learned about the mullahs’ nuclear program much later, and maybe even too late.
    • The development of weapons of mass destruction, including ballistic missiles, with the aim of targeting neighboring countries and further destabilizing the Middle East region.

    This was just a brief overview of the mullahs’ crimes. The full list can continue much longer. After years-long negotiations, a nuclear deal was forged between Tehran and world powers, but the agreement, which became formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), was very limited in its reach and gave the mullahs unwarranted concessions. Its most important shortcomings included the failure to address the mullahs’ terrorist activities, their ballistic missiles program and their abysmal human rights records. It also contained loopholes that allowed the Iranian regime to covertly continue developing nuclear weapons and break free of the deals constraints after a few years.

    After the accord, the regime was granted $100-150 billion in economic deals and access to frozen assets. This amount of money would be enough to rebuild Iran and help its economy flourish once again. But the mullahs used this windfall to continue their ballistic missiles program and to fund their warmongering in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, Palestine, and Yemen.

    Inside Iran, the nuclear deal bonanza yielded nothing for the Iranian people. In the three years that followed the accord, the people of Iran continued to reel under economic pressure and deteriorating living conditions. They continued to be deprived of their most basic social and political rights. The regime continued to engage in widespread repression of women and youth.

    In December 2017, fed up with the tyranny of the mullahs, the people of Iran poured into the streets of more than 140 cities and triggered a nationwide uprising against the regime. Despite the regime’s widespread efforts to quell the uprising, the people continued their protests throughout 2018.

    All of these events prove that the only answer to the regime’s belligerence abroad and its repression at home is increasing pressure against it on all fronts. This has been the policy supported by the NCRI and the MEK in the past four decades.

    By imposing comprehensive sanctions against the regime, the international community will cut of Tehran’s source for funding terrorism and weapons programs. This will be a great favor to the Iranian people, because it will prevent the regime from squandering their national resources on its evil goals.

    Therefore, intensifying sanctions against the regime will limit its destructive policies inside Iran and abroad.

    As Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, the president-elect of the NCRI said, “Sanctioning Khamenei & his office, the epicenter of crime, corruption & terrorism in Iran, is spot-on & most imperative. These sanctions must be expanded to the mullahs’ Ministry of Intelligence & Security (MOIS), which has blocked the uprising for a Free Iran.”

    However, sanctions against the Iranian regime is not enough, and they need to be complemented by supporting the Iranian people’s desire for democratic regime change in their country. The first critical step toward achieving this goal is recognizing the democratic alternative to the mullahs’ regime, the NCRI and the MEK. Even though the regime has executed and murdered more than 120,000 members and supporters of the MEK over the past 40 years, this organized resistance movement still stands strong and its influence and support inside and outside Iran continues to grow.

    In the past weeks, the supporters of the NCRI and MEK have been holding rallies and events in different countries to echo the voices of the people of Iran and to voice their support for the NCRI’s platform for the establishment of a democratic and secular state in Iran.

    The 10-point plan of Mrs. Rajavi represents everything that the Iranian people have been dreaming for and the guarantee for restoring peace and security in the Middle East.

    It is time for the world to stand by the side of the Iranian people as the write the new chapter in their history.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 12:26 pm on 23 Mar 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Sanctions,   

    Iranian New Year Looks Bleak for Regime 

    Masoud Dalvand(Freedom Star):

    The conditions of the Iranian regime in the new Iranian year, which began March 21, is a very difficult situation.

    Economically, with the withdrawal of the United States from JCPOA(Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action), and economic and oil sanctions, the mullahs’ regime is in a situation that see itself in the face of a deadlock and disappointment.
    The editorial board of the official website of the National Council of Resistance of Iran has published an instructive article that invites you to read it.

    Iranian New Year Looks Bleak for Regime

    During the past year, the Iranian regime has been struggling to keep control over a number of issues. One such issue is the country’s economy. Last year, U.S. President Donald Trump announced that the United States would be exiting the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and that tough economic sanctions would be re-instated.

    Throughout 2018, the U.S. President and his administration have been paying close attention to the Iranian regime and its belligerence in the region.

    The U.S. State Department called on all countries to decrease their imports of Iranian oil to zero. Most countries have completely complied with the request and some of the biggest importers of Iranian oil have been granted extensions.

    The Iranian economy took a hit and has been suffering for a number of months now. The people of Iran are getting poorer and poorer and an increasing number of people are falling into extreme poverty.

    A number of regime officials have tried to portray the image of a country that is recovering from the effect of the sanctions. President Hassan Rouhani said during his recent visit to Iraq that Iran had overcome the challenge of the U.S. sanctions. This could not be further from the truth.

    The Leader of the Iranian regime, Ali Khamenei, admitted in a New Year message that the people of Iran have struggled in recent months. He said that the country’s economy is an extremely urgent issue – the “primary” concern for the country.

    Not only has the Iranian currency lost significant value, but the purchasing power of the people has seriously declined. Reports from the country indicate that people have had to remove meat from their diets for the sole reason that they can’t afford it.

    The people of Iran are currently in the midst of Nowruz, or Persian New Year, celebrations, and again, many people are unable to afford the usual fare that they traditionally purchase.

    It is noticeable that simultaneously widespread activities of the Resistance Units and waves of discontent in the forms of strikes, protest gatherings and demonstrations are continuing across the country.

    The regime’s Leader said that the motto for the new year is “national production”. Yet, the chance of this being able to recover the economy is very slim. The Iranian regime, over the years, has completely destroyed the country’s economy and it has not taken any steps to remedy the situation.

    Corruption is rife at all levels of leadership and it has destroyed the trust of the people. Instead of improving social services, taking care of the critical environmental issues and taking steps to win back the confidence of the people, the regime has continued to plunder the nation’s wealth on terrorist groups and activities.

    The U.S. sanctions on Iran are really affecting the Iranian regime and this is exactly what the United States wants. The Trump administration is in the midst of a maximum pressure campaign and this is exactly what the situation warrants. His predecessor’s administration attempted the appeasement approach, but it was a complete failure. The EU is still trying to make the appeasement approach work, but it too is failing. This failure can be quantified when looking at how many terror attacks Iran attempted to carry out on European soil last year alone.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:31 am on 5 Aug 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Early Consequences of Sanctions Against Iran 

    Early Consequences of Sanctions Against Iran

    By Masoud Dalvand

    These days, the heated and controversial discussion of Iran’s sanctions has attracted attention and put the ruling mullahs in Iran at a deadly deadlock.

    Sanctions against Iran, in particular the sanctions on Iran’s oil, are actions taken by some countries in the world to propose a United States to prevent or restrict Iran’s nuclear program. The sanctions are aimed at removing the mullah’s regime from oil revenues and forcing them to cooperate with the international community to stop the construction of nuclear weapons and nuclear warheads.

    These sanctions are imposed through an immediate solution, i.e. boycott of purchases or buyers, or indirect ones, such as boycotting tanker ships or boycotting banks, with the aim of eliminating the purchasers of the oil and turning them to other suppliers of this commodity.

    Following US withdrawal from Iran deal or JCPOA on May 8, 2018, the US Treasury Department announced that sanctions against Iran would commence again in the 90th and 180th days after the withdrawal of Iran deal.

    Accordingly, the first US embargo against Iran will begin on August 6, 2018, and after this deadlock, the Iranian regime will not be able to buy the US dollar or trade gold or other commodities.

    In addition, sanctions against Iran will be imposed in the area of ​​aluminum, steel, coal, Dollar exchange and automobile industry, and significant restrictions will be imposed on transactions with Rial outside Iran.

    Iran-Root-Cause-of-Economic-Crisis

    The second US sanctions package against Iran will be operational on November 4, 2018.

    From now on, international restrictions will apply to the activities of the National Iranian Oil Company and the purchase of oil, petrochemicals and petroleum products from Iran will be subject to sanctions.

    The Iranian shipping industry, the activities of the Central Bank of Iran and the Western financial institutions, as well as those whose names were removed from the sanctions list on January 16, 2016, would be subject to further sanctions.

    The Consequences of the first phase of the sanctions

    At this point, those who came to Iran with a deal with sanctions are back to the sanctions list.

    It should be kept in mind that Iran was one of the world’s largest oil producers and issued billions of dollars of oil and gas annually. But Iran’s oil production, along with its GDP, fell dramatically with international sanctions.

    At the same time, it should be borne in mind that such sanctions will go beyond the scope of the relationship between Iran and the United States, in such a way that all non-US companies that interact with the Iranian market will aim at unilateral US sanctions.

    At a news conference July 2, State Department Policy Planning Director Brian Hook, said that Washington is “safe enough” to supply oil to replace Iran’s crude oil.

    The US goal is “to increase the pressure on the Iranian regime to cut its oil revenues and bring it to zero.”

    This equilibrium will be offset by OPEC, India and Saudi Arabia.

    The Consequences of the second phase of the sanctions

    According to US sanctions, the US Treasury Department will review the performance of the Iranian oil purchasers six months after the withdrawal from Iran deal (November 2018) and, if they have not complied with the sanctions law, countries banks that buy Iran oil and pay to the Central Bank of Iran (such as Chinese, Korean or Indian banks) are subject to sanctions. The United States has announced that all countries and companies that will cooperate with Iran after November 4, 2018 will be subject to US sanctions.

    What is the real solution to the crisis?

    Now and after all the sanctions and political and economic equations, the people of Iran say the last words. They want a government that, instead of investing heavily in terrorism, promote peace and prosperity and peaceful coexistence with its neighbors.

    As Mariam Rajavi, President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), recently said in a statement:

    The disastrous state of the economy and the foreign exchange market is the direct product of the regime’s depravity. The free fall of the value of Rial to the world’s lowest is a consequence of the rule of the mullahs who have destroyed everything to preserve their power.

    The mullahs have no solution for containing the chaotic state of the economy and all their measures and plans have failed. Sacking the Central Bank’s president, arresting bazaar merchants, spreading lies and false pretenses are no longer effective.

    Iran’s crumbling economy cannot be saved unless by toppling the regime.

    Hence, in these days, more courageous than ever, the Iranian people in Tehran, Mashhad, Karaj, Shiraz, Isfahan and Rasht and other cities scream the overthrow of the religious dictatorship and say death to the dictator. It is the right of the Iranian people to live in peace and freedom and in a democratic country, with a prosperous economy. Enough of war and destruction, terrorism and corruption and poverty.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:24 pm on 7 Jul 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    The Iran policy choice is clear: Support the people 

     

    The Iran policy choice is clear- Support the people

    The people of Iran support sanctions against the clerical regime and its repressive apparatuses such as the IRGC

    Iran, July 7, 2018 – As Iran’s crises in the Middle East escalate, especially in Yemen, Syria, and Iraq, more signs are showing the regime’s internal crises will be boiling to a point of causing extreme troubles for Tehran’s mullahs.

    “… the United States and our allies need to use whatever political, economic, diplomatic and commercial capabilities we have to help the people of Iran take the regime down themselves,” wrote Peter Huessy, director of Strategic Deterrent Studies at the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies of the Air Force Association, in a recent article in The Hill.

    With a close look at the region, it is easily realized that Washington has been preparing a vast coalition to tackle this task. Iran’s forces and proxies Syria and Yemen are also under heavy strikes.

    Iran is also facing a conglomerate of challenges. The collapsing currency, the constant outpouring of capital, the middle class joining the protests, increasing government repression, including measures such as beatings, jailing, extrajudicial executions and killings, and arbitrary arrests.

    Multiple cities across the country are witnessing a variety of protests causing enormous damages for the regime. In response, the mullahs are only pledging to increase the severity of punishments against such scenarios.

    To add insult to injury, a long list of companies are also ending their investment projects in Iran, in fear of confronting U.S.’ secondary sanctions, especially come November 4th when Iran’s oil and banking sectors go under major blockades.

    Further harsh measures are in the making for Iran’s regime.

    “Iran should be removed from access to SWIFT, (The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications), so it cannot sell and purchase oil,” Huessy adds.

    The next logical step would be to effectively embargo the Iranian regime’s oil export. This is especially necessary as videos on social media are proving that the Iranian people are suffering and never enjoying any benefits of oil sales or other sources promised by the regime, particularly following the flawed Iran nuclear deal signing.

    Further steps should include:

    Shutting down the Iranian regime’s embassies, enhancing water supplies for the people after this regime’s toppling, launching cyber campaigns targeting the regime’s nuclear weapons/ballistic missile program, and providing meaningful support for the Iranian people in their protests and demonstrations against this regime.

    The free world today is facing a simple choice. Stand alongside the Iranian people to end the mullahs’ rule, or stand aside and witness the rise of an enormously dangerous regime in the Middle East that threatens all our ways of life and the entirety of our values.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:32 pm on 3 Jun 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran: Hezbollah Sanctions Are One Step in Curbing Iran’s Influence 

    Iran-Hezbollah-sanctions-are-one-step-in-curbing-Irans-influence-750

    Iran-Hezbollah sanctions are one step in curbing Iran’s influence

    The political situation in Lebanon is in turmoil. The recent parliamentary elections had the aim of selecting representatives. However, one other thing became glaringly obvious – the power that Iran and Hezbollah hold there.

    Iran has gained considerable influence in the country mostly due to its political alliances, especially that of Michel Aoun – the Lebanese president – and several political parties including the Free Patriotic Movement (FPM) party.

    Not forgetting Iran’s use of brute force and violence that it employs to eliminate the threat from opponents.

    Sanctions on the Lebanese Hezbollah were imposed by the Arab Gulf nations and the United States. This is no surprise given that Iran has been helped by Hezbollah in its expansion across the region.

    Iran has become a major problem and threat in the Middle East. For years, US administrations have tried to contain the Iran threat and, over the course of decades, several presidents put in place sanctions that ended up crippling the Iranian economy. However, all the progress was undone when former president Barack Obama took office and lifted the sanctions and pursued policies of appeasement towards Iran.

    Iran was given access to billions of dollars when the sanctions were lifted. Even before and during the negotiations for the 2015 nuclear deal, Obama turned a blind eye to much of Iran’s belligerence and blindly preached about how Iran would become more moderate and so on.

    Iran did not become more moderate. In fact, it became emboldened and spread further across the region.

    US President Donald Trump has vowed to eliminate the Iran threat and recently announced that he was withdrawing from the nuclear agreement. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also delivered a speech in which he listed 12 conditions Iran must adhere to before there is any discussion about the United States re-entering the deal.

    Pompeo and Trump reminded the world that the Iran threat is more than just nuclear. They warned that Iran’s heavy funding of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and the numerous militias and proxy groups that it supports, including the Lebanese Hezbollah, are permitting Iran to reach further than ever.

    The fact that the sanctions come at a time when a new Lebanese government is about to be formed is crucial. It is a warning to any potential leader in Lebanon, including current Prime Minister Saad Hariri, that the US and Arab nations are serious about curbing the threat. The message is that any future relations between the coalition and Lebanon will not involve Iran or Hezbollah.

    Critics say that the sanctions are harsh on the Lebanese state, but they are in fact the perfect opportunity for any leaders to get rid of Hezbollah from the cabinet so that economic consequences are avoided.

    It will also urge the President of Lebanon to undo the 2006 memorandum of understanding with Hezbollah with regards to the ridiculous claim that it is defending its arsenal.

    Taking such measures against Iran, indirectly, are essential to putting the brakes on its spread of chaos.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:12 pm on 4 Apr 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran: Consequences Of US Pulling Out Of Nuclear Deal 

    Iran’s Bushehr nuclear plant

    With the announcement of a new Secretary of State and a new national security adviser, many have said that the odds of President Donald Trump pulling out of the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement have increased.

    Furthermore, it seems very unlikely that the European parties to the deal – the United Kingdom, France and Germany – will be able to guarantee and address the changes that Trump requested.

    For one, the three European countries submitted a proposal to sanction Iran for its ballistic missile activities and its belligerence and interference in Syria. However, the proposal must get unanimous approval and there are already several countries that have expressed opposition, including Spain, Austria and Italy. Italy said that it was very concerned about its interests worth millions of dollars being put into jeopardy.

    Of course no-one can predict how Iran will react if Trump did announce that he was no longer going to waiver sanctions, however it can be safely presumed that the news will not go down well. Some have even said that Iran will immediately start carrying out illicit nuclear activities. The Iranian regime has previously tried to provoke Trump with acts of defiance.

    The regime could reinstall some of its centrifuges that have been out of use for months and it could continue to fine-tune other ones. It could also start to stockpile uranium instead of shipping it abroad or it could enrich it to 20 per cent.

    Some believe that there will be a race to the nuclear bomb. Others say that this is not possible – no matter how much the Iranian regime wants to.

    According to Reuel Gerecht, a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, and Ray Takeyh, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, the main obstacle is the unfinished work on advanced centrifuges.

    Ali Akbar Salehi, the head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), is an Iranian diplomat and academic who is probably behind Iran’s large-scale illicit dual-use import network. He has the support of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and, when President Hassan Rouhani became the president in 2013, he was able to make great progress on the country’s atomic infrastructure.

    Gerecht and Takeyh say that it would take years for the Iranian regime to reinstall the high-yield centrifuges. Furthermore, they are currently under surveillance by the nuclear watchdog that is in charge of monitoring Iran’s compliance with the nuclear deal – the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). If Iran were to reinstall the centrifuges, it would not go unnoticed and there is a high likelihood that military strikes from the US would shortly follow.

    It has also been posited that the Iranian regime will not be quick to take any overly-drastic action if Trump announces a US pull-out of the agreement because it is nervous of the US administration. Especially now that new appointments have been made and the deal-sympathizers have gone.

    The United States is making it very clear that the “golden years” of appeasement are over and one can only hope that one day soon, the Europeans will follow.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:24 am on 2 Nov 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran Regime’s Senior Officials Acknowledge That IRGC Controls the Economy 

    NCRI-Yellow

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    iranarabspring

    Iranian regime is engulfed with Major concerns over the Revolutionary Guards’ (IRGC) terrorist designation and the implementation of new U.S. sanctions, known as CAATSA, as it appears in the remarks resorted by its senior officials.

    “Implementing CAATSA means sanctioning the establishment’s official military force and they can even sanction the government under the pretext of its cooperation with the IRGC,” said judiciary Chief Sadeq Larijani. (Vatan-e Emrooz daily, October 31st)

    “Based on the policies instructed by the leader, our missile ranges are 2,000 kilometers… This is enough for now,” said IRGC chief Mohammad Ali Jafar on October 31st, signaling a step back considering the seriousness of these sanctions.

    Whereas on October 18th he is known to have said, “Our influence in the region and the power of our missile capabilities……

    View original post 496 more words

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:57 pm on 1 Nov 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Welcoming New Sanctions Against IRGC Commanders and Affiliates 

    Iran Sanctions

    The Iranian Resistance welcomes sanctions by the US Treasury Department against a number of Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) commanders and affiliates, engaged in suppressing and plundering the Iranian people as well as export of terrorism and proliferation of ballistic missiles. The Iranian Resistance views this as a necessary step in dealing with the clerical regime’s suppressive, belligerent, and terrorist policies and proliferation of ballistic missiles that endanger the peace and tranquility in the region.

    These sanctions should be quickly extended to all the individuals, entities, institutions, and companies affiliated or dealing with the IRGC, as well as to the IRGC’s foreign mercenaries. It is even more imperative that sanctions be imposed on IRGC commanders stationed in 31 provinces throughout Iran, who are responsible for suppressing the population.

    Implementing the law passed by the US Congress regarding sanctions on the IRGC, as well as designating IRGC as a terrorist entity, require adopting measures to expel the IRGC from the region, specifically Syria and Iraq,. These measures are prerequisite to ending the war and bloodshed and establishing peace in the region.

    The Iranian Resistance calls on the European Union to join in sanctioning the IRGC.

    A major part of the Iranian economy is controlled by the IRGC, and therefore deals with the IRGC are tantamount to fueling its belligerence, its terror and suppression machine, the expansion of its nuclear weapons program and the proliferation of ballistic missiles.

    IRGC Brigadier, Gholamreza Jalali, the commander of the regime’s Passive Defense, acknowledged in an interview with the state TV on October 29 that the IRGC’s Khatam-ol-Anbiya Headquarters “carries out many projects such as building dams, power plants, and refineries… Some 5,000 companies are working with the Khatam Headquarters.”

    Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran
    October 31, 2017

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:31 pm on 5 Oct 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    What Iran Needs Are Not Concessions But Sanctions 

    With concerns escalating, North Korea should not lead us to tone down our voice and provide further concessions to Pyongyang and Tehran. We should in fact do the opposite.

    More than two years after the flaws of a deal between the P5+1 and Iran over the latter’s nuclear program have become obvious, a chorus is busy insisting there is no other option. While the rendered pact, known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), has failed to rein in the Tehran regime, correct measures are available at hand.

    Some argue the JCPOA has successfully slowed Iran’s dangerous drive to obtain nuclear weapons. The Center for a New American Security held a forum titled, “Consequences of a Collapse of the Iran Nuclear Deal,” featuring “a plethora of prominent speakers advocating in favor of preserving the deal, including former senior Obama administration official, Colin Kahl, a chief proponent of the agreement,” according to The Washington Free Beacon.

    We Do Indeed Have Other Viable Options

    The highly controversial Parchin military complex, located southeast of Tehran, was “inspected” by Iran’s own “scientists” to provide samples to the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency. That is tantamount to asking a murderer to deliver his DNA, in privacy without any supervision, as evidence to compare with that found at a crime scene where closed-circuit cameras recorded his presence at the time of the crime.

    JCPOA advocates say the deal isn’t perfect, yet also claim measures against Iran are ill-founded and can be counterproductive. This is not the case.

    “The administration could discourage global firms from doing business with Iran by leaving open its final position on the deal, and thus placing at risk their business with America,” as proposed in a recent Foreign Policy piece by James Jeffrey, a former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Turkey.

    Yes, such measures would disappoint Tehran. Yet knowledge of this regime’s nature suggests such actions will not push Iran to the brink of abandoning the JCPOA ship, as they are benefiting from the present terms.

    And yes, the Iran nuclear deal is a multilateral agreement, as European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini reminded. Yet also as a reminder, in case of Iran violating the JCPOA terms, the United States can unilaterally launch the “snapback” process and have UN sanctions re-imposed on Iran. In such a scenario there is no need to garner support from Russia or China, both known for backing Tehran, as Security Council veto authority is irrelevant in this regard.

    Appeasement Is a Failed Approach

    With concerns over this issue escalating, the case of North Korea should not lead us to tone down our voice and provide further concessions to Pyongyang and Tehran. We should in fact do the opposite. This dossier should help us realize that appeasement—the same mentality embraced by the Obama administration in blueprinting the highly flawed JCPOA—has placed us where we are today with North Korea.

    Do we seek to trek down the same path with Iran, a state with dangerous influence across the already flashpoint Middle East? One such horrible example is Iran’s involvement in Syria. JCPOA advocates are also describing a “best-case scenario” of providing more concessions to North Korea to muster a “far-from-perfect” pact, similar to the Iran deal, in exchange for Pyongyang to freeze its nuclear development.

    Déjà vu. Haven’t we already experienced this with the Clinton administration’s “Agreed Framework” of 1994? Kim Jong Un recently tested his state’s sixth and most powerful nuclear device, claiming to be a hydrogen bomb. As another harsh reminder, rapprochement with North Korea led to the notorious 2010 sinking of the South Korean destroyer, the Cheonan. It is quite obvious by now that a Pyongyang submarine torpedoed the warship and left 46 sailors dead.

    Does another South Korea naval ship, or a city for that matter, have to be targeted for us to realize that rogue states such as Iran and North Korea will only consider engagement as a sign of the international community’s weakness and take full advantage of it? Or must a U.S. Navy ship in the Persian Gulf come into the crosshairs of Revolutionary Guards’ fast boats for the West to finally open its eyes?

    Some think Iran lacks the necessary will and understands all too well how such a move would spark drastic international measures against its interests. JCPOA advocates (read Iranian apologists) have also delegitimized any concern about Tehran’s intentions by claiming pact violations, such as breaching limits set on heavy water—the substance needed for plutonium-based nuclear bombs—as mere “bumps in the road.”

    This shows those making such arguments either lack the necessary knowledge of Iran’s belligerent nature in the past four decades, or simply fall into the category of Iran lobbyists. Fierce international sanctions left Iran no choice but to succumb to nuclear talks with knees bleeding. More non-nuclear sanctions are needed to make Tehran understand the international community means business.

    “Peace for our time” was the claim made by British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain in his September 30, 1938 speech concerning the Munich Agreement with Adolf Hitler. Seventy million people paid the price of that strategic mistake with their lives. Let us finally learn our lesson of appeasement and put aside such an approach for good.

    via What Iran Needs Are Not Concessions But Sanctions — Iran Commentary

     
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