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  • Masoud Dalvand 11:26 am on August 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Political Prisoners   

    Iran: A call to save lives of hunger striking political prisoners 


    Iran Human Rights Monitor, August 18, 2017 – On July 30, the Warden of Rajaii Shahr Prison along with special execution guards wearing black masks, attacked Hall 12 of Ward 4, beating 53 prisoners there and damaging their belongings. They broke the air conditioners and water purification device, tore up prisoners’ personal photos and notes, and stole their money.
    A number of these prisoners are vocal supporters of the Iranian opposition, PMOI/MEK.
    The prisoners subsequently transferred to a high security section in this prison which is equipped with CCTV and is separated from the rest of the prison by security dividers. More than 60 surveillance devices and 40 closed-circuit cameras have been installed in this hall to prevent any leakage of reports outside. All openings and windows have been covered and sealed with metal sheets.
    Some of them were transferred to solitary confinement with handcuffs and shackles. 18 of these prisoners went on hunger strike to protest harsh treatment by prison authorities and guards as the prisoners were not allowed to take their medicines and personal belongings with them.
    The 18 are identified as, Khaled Hardani, Reza Akbari Monfared, Shahin Zoghitabar, Saeid Masuri, Jafar Eghdami, Payam Shakiba, Abolghasem Fuladvand, Hamid Babaei, Hamzeh Savari, Saeid Shirzad, Hassan Sadeghi, Majid Assadi, Loghman and Zanyar Moradi, Ebrahim Firouzi, Reza Shahabi, Amir Ghaziani and Vahid Nasiri.
    In solidarity with their fellow inmates, Misters Mohammad Bannazadeh Amirkhizi, and Mohammad Ali Mansouri also staged hunger strike in Hall 10 of Ward4.

    Some of the prisoners are presently suffering from poor health as they have been denied their necessary medications and reasonable ventilation in the new building.
    Relatives of one of the prisoners expressed concern about these conditions and said, “The Iranian Judiciary’s security system is apparently trying to create concentration-camp-like conditions by stepping up control, imposing more restrictions and depriving prisoners from their basic needs. Security officials in the Judiciary also intend to undermine political prisoners’ power by jeopardizing their health.”
    Iranian authorities have attempted in every possible way to force the prisoners to end their hunger strike. They have threatened two death-row inmates, Loghman and Zanyar Moradi, with carrying out their sentences if they continue their hunger strike. They have threatened others by depriving them of any family visits.
    This is not the first time that the Iranian regime has targeted defenseless political prisoners who have to go on hunger strike and risk their own health to convey their voice to the outside world.
    Human Rights Monitor urges all international human rights organizations and authorities, particularly the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Mr. Zayd Raad Al Hussein and the UN Special Rapporteur on human rights, Ms. Asma Jahangir, and the rapporteurs on torture and the right to life to take urgent action to save the lives of these political prisoners and send a delegation to Iran to investigate treatment of political prisoners.
    We also call on all democratic governments to make their relations with the Iranian regime conditional upon improvement of the human rights situation in Iran and release of political prisoners.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:51 am on August 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Political Prisoners,   

    Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ 

    by Siavosh Hosseini 

    The Iranian regime has increasingly focused on clamping down on anyone who speaks out against the human rights abuses of its ruling class. One of the key areas where this is demonstrated is in the trials of these individuals. Many lack basic legal representation, and the proceedings are brief. If they do have legal representation, there are often hurdles for them to meet with their lawyers and having access to court files delayed.

    Human rights lawyers who speak out against torture and unfair trials have also faced harassment, disbarment, and imprisonment. Trials of human rights defenders generally take place in a climate of fear.

    Amnesty International recently launched a global campaign ‘Brave’, calling for an end to attacks against those defending human rights worldwide.

    “It is a bitter irony that as the Iranian authorities boast about their increased engagement with the UN and the EU, particularly in the aftermath of the nuclear deal, human rights defenders who have made contact with these same institutions are being treated as criminals,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Research and Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

    “Rather than propagating the dangerous myth that human rights defenders pose a threat to national security, the Iranian authorities should focus on addressing the legitimate concerns they raise. These are people who have risked everything to build a more humane and just society – it is appalling that they are so viciously punished for their bravery.”

    Amnesty International, who released a new report entitled ‘Caught in a web of repression: Iran’s human rights defenders under attack’, is calling on the EU to speak out in the strongest terms against the persecution of human rights defenders in the country.

    “The international community, and in particular the EU, must not stay silent over the outrageous treatment of human rights defenders in Iran,” said Luther. “Instead of appeasing Iranian officials, the EU should forcefully call for the immediate and unconditional release of all those jailed for their peaceful human rights activism and for an end to the misuse of the justice system to silence activists.”

    This recent report detailed the crackdown on human rights defenders in a variety of key areas, including the death penalty, women’s rights, and trade unionists, just to name a few.

    Over the past four years, Iran’s judiciary have dropped the threshold for invoking the vague national security-related charges, while increasing the length of prison sentences for these individuals. Many of their crimes include contacting the UN and the EU, as well as international agencies focused on human rights.

    via  Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:49 am on August 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Political Prisoners   

    Political prisoner, Maryam Akbari Monfared, seeks justice over Iran’s 1988 Massacre 

    In October 2016, Iranian political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared took the unprecedented bold move of filing an official complaint with the Prosecutor General of Tehran over the arbitrary execution of her brother and sister during the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran. She did so on 15 October 2016 from the Women’s Ward of Tehran’s notorious Evin Prison.

    مريم اكبري منفرد

    Ms. Akbari Monfared’s 15 October 2016 complaint read in part: “My brother Abdolreza and my sister Roqieh were executed on an unknown date during the summer of 1988. They were both tried by the Revolutionary Court and sentenced to prison terms. They were deprived of their right to have a lawyer to represent them. Abdolreza was arrested when he was only 17 for selling Mojahed publication (affiliated to the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran – PMOI or MEK). He was sentenced to three years imprisonment in 1980, but the authorities refused to release him after he completed his prison term until he was finally executed in 1988.

    Just a day later, on 16 October 2016, Ms. Akbari-Monfared published an open letter stating her demands in her quest to obtain justice for her loved ones who perished during the 1988 massacre.

    On 30 October 2016, Ms. Akbari-Monfared filed a follow up complaint with the Judiciary demanding an investigation to discover the identities of the perpetrators of the 1988 massacre.

     On 3 November 2016, a group of political prisoners in Gohardasht (Rajai-Shahr) Prison in Karaj issued a statement in support of Ms. Akbari-Monfared.

    Also on 3 November 2016, Amnesty International issued an Urgent Action appeal stating that prisoner of conscience Maryam Akbari Monfared, who is serving a 15-year sentence in Tehran’s Evin Prison, is being denied access to medical treatment and is facing reprisals after filing a formal complaint that seeks an official investigation into the mass killings of political prisoners, including her siblings, in the summer of 1988.

    On 10 November 2016, Sara Jafari-Hatam, the daughter of Maryam Akbari-Monfared, wrote to the UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Iran Ms. Asma Jahangir over the plight of her imprisoned mother.

    Ms. Akbari-Monfared’s case continues to draw domestic and international attention.

    Source: Justice for Victims of 1988 Massacre in Iran (JVMI) website 

    via Political prisoner, Maryam Akbari Monfared, seeks justice over #Iran’s #1988Massacre — iranarabspring

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:13 pm on August 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Political Prisoners,   

    What is the status of political prisoner, Atena Daemi? 

    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Childrens Rights Activist Petition

    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Childrens Rights Activist Petition

    IRAN, 06 August 2017— The political prisoner, Atena Daemi, who has been serving time in Evin Prison, was newly framed by the warden and the head of the infirmary as ‘breaching the peace of prison’ with her hunger strike.
    Prison term for Atena Daemi, anti-death penalty activist!
    Prison term  for Atena Daemi, anti-death penalty activist!
    On Monday, July 26, the human rights activist, Atena Daemi was transferred to Branch 4 of Evin’s court from the women’s ward.
    The interrogator informed Atena Daemi that the prison’s authorities have newly filed a complaint against her. Atena Daemi was briefed by the alleged crimes of ‘breaching the peace of prison” and ‘insulting the prison guards.’
    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Children
    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Children’s Rights Activist Petition
    The head of Evin’s infirmary was introduced as one of the plaintiffs in Atena Daemi’s case. This healthcare official expressed concern since the media had earlier reflected his attitude towards the prisoners of conscience as well as the violation of rights. He also intimidated to revenge on some of the prisoners including Atena Daemi for naming him in their letters.
    One of the notorious personnel of Evin Prison named Abbas Khani also filed a lawsuit against another prisoner, Maryam Zarghan who was on the brink of release.
    The Warden of Evin Prison is another plaintiff of Atena Daemi. According to the interrogator, Atena Daemi is accused of breaching the peace of prison with her hunger strike and sit-in protests. She committed these acts to call for the implementation of human rights and review on her case. She is also charged with insulting the prison’s authorities when they accused her of malingering following her hunger strike and her transfer to the infirmary.
     
     Atena Daemi is currently detained in women’s ward of Evin Prison. She is in her 9th months of temporary arrest and waiting for the verdict of the appeal’s court.
    In her defense, Atena Daemi requested the interrogator to allow her trusted physician to be present in the court and give testimony on her critical health condition in time of hunger strike so that they realize there was no malingering. The head of the infirmary is actually the person that should be prosecuted for the charges of depriving prisoners from medical services as well as accusing them.
    A source close to Atena Daemi confirmed the report and stated, ‘Abbas Khani visited the women’s ward of Evin Prison and told Ms. Daemi that she didn’t have any health issues, according to the medical tests. However, Atena believes that the hospital doctor has forged the medical records. The claim was made on the same day that Atena’s doctor had given her Monuril (a strong antibiotic) for her illness.
    It is noteworthy that Abbas Khani prohibited Atena’s transfer to the hospital on July 17, 2017, in retaliation, however, her transfer had been earlier confirmed by the prosecutor.’

    Source: What is the status of political prisoner, Atena Daemi?

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:03 am on August 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Political Prisoners,   

    Those who met their appointment with Freedom 

    30,000 red roses

    On the anniversary of the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran

    The 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners in Iran

    has been described as the worst crime against humanity since World War II. [1]

    28 years after this genocide, the Iranian regime still refuses to acknowledge the executions, or provide any information as to how many prisoners were killed.

    Based on eyewitness accounts of survivors, the massacre had been prepared for from at least a year before. The order for the massacre came from Khomeini directly in the form of a religious decree (fatwa), calling for the execution of all who remained steadfast in their support for the opposition People’s Mojahedin of Iran.[2]

    A so-called Amnesty Commission (better known among prisoners as the Death Commission) asked a simple question from every prisoner: do you still support the PMOI/MEK? Those who answered yes were executed, even if they had already finished serving their original sentence.[3] None of the victims had any new activities while in detention and many of them were 15 or 16 years of age at the time of original arrest and prosecution.

    The executions started in the last week of July, peaking on July 28 until August 14, and continuing onto autumn and even the following year in some places.

    Naturally, the vast majority of the victims were members and supporters of the PMOI/MEK, but the order extended to other groups in later stages.

    Prisoners were hanged in groups, sometimes 10 to 15 at a time, and later transported out of prison by dump trucks, and buried in unmarked mass graves. There was no mercy on anyone, even young girls and pregnant women.

    Khomeini’s haste to execute was so abhorrent many of his closest confidantes had doubts about it. Hossein Ali Montazeri, Khomeini’s heir apparent and the country’s second highest authority at the time, urged for leniency and a slowdown.[4]

    In a book of memoirs published in December 2000, Montazeri pointed out the vicious tortures practiced especially against young girls and women before execution during the 1988 massacre.

    In a famous letter to Khomeini which led to his ouster, Montazeri wrote, “If you probably insist on your decision, at least order (the three-man Death Commission) to base their rulings on unanimous vote not that of the majority. And women should also be made exceptions, especially women who have children. And finally, the execution of several thousand people in several days will backfire.”

    From this letter we can understand the role and impact of women in the prisons of those days. They were firm and resilient and inspired resistance despite knowing the fact that they would have to go through the horrifying experience rape before being hanged. But they said NO to the executioners.

    It has been reported that 80 percent of PMOI women detained in the Women’s Ward 3 of Evin Prison had been massacred by September 1988. They included Monireh Rajavi, who had two small daughters and was executed only because she was the sister of the Iranian Resistance’s Leader Massoud Rajavi. There was also Ashraf Ahmadi, a political prisoner from the Shah’s time, with four children. The victims also included a wide range of people from various professions, including PMOI’s female candidates for parliamentary elections Fatemeh Zare’ii from Shiraz, and Zohreh Ainol-Yagheen from Isfahan. Dr. Hamideh Sayyahi and Dr. Shourangiz Karimian, along with her sister, and National Volleyball Team player Forouzan Abdi were among those executed in the 1988 massacre.

    An audio clip just recently released by Montazeri’s family on his website, also reveals dreadful details about the massacre of women. The tape recording from Mr. Montazeri’s meeting with members of the Death Commission, includes an example about the execution of a 15-year-old girl who had been taken to prison only two days before to break her resistant brother but since she did not denounce her executed brother, she was executed, as well.

    The tape also includes reference to the execution of a pregnant woman in Isfahan.

    The overall picture of the 1988 massacre is totally inadequate because the massacre was extensive, carried out in prisons all across the country. In some instances, there was not any survivor. The clerical regime dealt with every information regarding the massacre as top secret, not allowing any leaks.

    So, what is known about the massacre has been extracted and pieced together from the limited number of reports by survivors and families who were called to collect the bodies of their loved ones,[5] as well as from scattered acknowledgments made by the regime’s former officials as noted in this article.

    The other side of this crime against humanity is of course, the steadfastness of a generation of prisoners who did not buckle under the threat of death and defended their identity which was akin to their nation’s freedom. They thus sealed their nation’s right to freedom of choice and thought, and turned this great crime against humanity into an epical humane epitome of human grace and grit which makes every conscientious human being humble before its magnificence.

    The Iranian Resistance has renewed its call for the international prosecution of all perpetrators of the 1988 massacre and crime against humanity in Iran, who are still in power and hold important positions of authority. They include Khamenei (then President under Khomeini), Rafsanjani (then acting Commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces), Rouhani (then assistant to the acting Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces), and members of the death commission, Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi (Minister of Justice under Hassan Rouhani), Hossein-Ali Nayyeri (head of the Supreme Disciplinary Court for Judges under Rouhani), Morteza Eshraqi (then Prosecutor), and Ebrahim Raeesi (one of the top clerics, member of the Assembly of Experts, and Khamenei’s appointed head of Astan Qods-e Razavi foundation, which is an important political and economic powerhouses funding the regime’s war efforts).

    [1] A former Intelligence Ministry deputy recorded a video clip in 2008, in which he revealed that the clerical regime had massacred some 33,700 political prisoners and buried them in mass graves. According to Reza Malek, there are between 170 to 190 mass graves across the country.

    [2] “Whoever at any stage continues to belong to the (PMOI/MEK) must be executed,” Khomeini’s fatwa read.

    [3] Khomeini assigned a three-member so-called “Amnesty Commission”, who held summary trials and actually interrogated prisoners to determine their fate.

    The questions were focused on whether the inmate continued to have any allegiances to the PMOI/MEK. If the prisoners were not willing to fully collaborate with the regime against the PMOI/MEK, it was viewed as a sign of sympathy to the organization and the sentence was immediate execution.

    [4] Montazeri was ousted and placed under house arrest until his death in 2009, for his protests against the massacre.   

    [5] A report from Shiraz indicated: “When we the rumors of the massacres spread among the public, we referred to the prison. Executioners told us, ‘What did you expect, that we serve you sweets and candies? We killed 860 people at once in one day! Now, if you hold a funeral, we will raze down your house as well.’ “

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:47 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Political Prisoners   

    Short Video: The unpunishment Crime 1988 Massacre in Iran 

    This short video is presented to commemorate the 30,000 Political Prisoners of Iran who executed in the 1988.

     
    • bluemoone 3:20 am on July 24, 2017 Permalink

      So sad. but they should be remembered and their work carried on. Peace be.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 6:22 am on July 24, 2017 Permalink

      Thank you dear Danielle, yes you’re right they will be remembered on our mind and our hearts.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 7:54 pm on July 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Political Prisoners   

    The unpunished crime, 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran 

    1988massacre

    In the summer of 1988, the Iranian regime summarily and extra-judicially executed tens of thousands of political prisoners held in jails across Iran. The massacre was carried out on the basis of a fatwa by the regime’s then-Supreme Leader Ruhollah Khomeini.

    More than 30,000 political prisoners were massacred in Iran in the summer of 1988.

    • The massacre was carried out on the basis of a fatwa by Khomeini.

    • The vast majority of the victims were activists of the opposition PMOI (MEK).

    • A Death Committee approved all the death sentences.

    • Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi, a member of the Death Committee, is today Hassan Rouhani’s Justice Minister.

    • The perpetrators of the 1988 massacre have never been brought to justice.

    The below video is a short view to the unpunished crime, 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran:

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:21 am on July 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Political Prisoners,   

    The unpunished crime, 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran 

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:03 pm on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Political Prisoners   

    Political prisoners in Iran continuing hunger strike 

    political-prisoners-in-iran-continuing-hunger-strike

    By Shahriar Kia

    In Iran, three political prisoners by the names of Rasoul Razavi, Morteza Morad Pour and Hossein Ali Mohammadi have continued their hunger strike on November 12th

    Protesting regime officials’ refusal to release him, Razavi remains steadfast on his hunger strike since October 4th after being exiled to Gohardasht Prison of Karaj, west of Tehran.

    40 days after his hunger strike the Razavi family remained in the dark about his deteriorating health conditions.

    Mohammadi has also launched an indefinite hunger strike, protesting being beaten by Tabriz Prison officials and prison guards. He was punished by the authorities by being transferred toward 12 where non-political and dangerous criminals are held.

    Moradpour remains on hunger strike as well, protesting his release being postponed and launching a hunger strike on October 25th as a result.

     

    via Political prisoners in Iran continuing hunger strike — Iran Liberty

     
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