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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:35 am on August 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison 

    A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison

    Sufferings of mothers of PMOI martyrs

    In the name of God, in the name of freedom, knowledge and justice

    We have already spoken of the magnificent stories of those fallen for freedom. We have written many poems and songs about the most splendid epics created in the Iranian people’s quest for freedom.

    Our hearts are filled with love and faith when we hail the lofty souls of those heroes in chains and those who sealed their honesty and loyalty with ultimate sacrifice.

    I am writing for the mothers and fathers whose strength and resistance make mountains humble. I am writing to pay tribute to their humane interpretation of the word, “mother”, and to thank their abundant love which never dies down and their endurance that passes like a breeze through the stormy sky.

    I turn the pages of my memoirs, to reach the page where I first found your familiar gaze. I could see the glad tidings of life in your kind eyes as if a dandelion was passing through the experience of life with a cry for justice.

    In the noisy days when the POWs were returning home, we had decorated our neighbourhood with strings of light to celebrate the return of Reza, our next door neighbour, Mrs. Zahra’s son.

    On that same day, my mother had gone to Behesht-e Zahra (cemetery). She returned home at around noon. I remember the exact moment. My mother hugged Reza, squeezed him hard and kissed him on the cheeks, as if she was kissing her beloved son, Abdolreza, who had been executed earlier. All day long, you were deep in your own thoughts, and your eyes bespoke of the lashes of injustice.

    My eyes followed you, step by step, cuddling your tall figure. You had been through so many twists and turns, so many ups and downs, you had witnessed so much atrocity, so much injustice, and you were still standing tall.

    I can remember your words on that day. “I wish I could also celebrate the return of my loved ones; although I didn’t see even their corpses, nor did I have the permission to mourn them.”

    NCRI Women fb

    Yes, in the days when people were tossing flower petals in the streets of Iran and decorating all neighborhoods with string lights for the return of POWs, and everyone was engulfed in joy and happiness, there were also some mothers who were mourning their children and their beloved young men and women who had been executed. No one knew what was going on in the hearts of those mothers.

    The lullabies of these mothers became an anthem for freedom so that the Divine rule of God would shine on the Earth and give meaning to the world with His love and mercy.

    The children of these dear mothers and fathers who were sacrificed on the altar, turned into inspirations and symbols of sacrifice, steadfastness and courage.

    fb Marc Nelson

    My parents were only an example of many other parents who had been born human in the darkness of a land where their ancestors had been unjustly hanged by the rope of the scale of justice; they were the ones who ran like blood in the veins of the history of our homeland.

    These were the fathers and mothers who wrote the pages of victory in their own time in the silence of an everlasting love.

    Mother is the symbol of love, sacrifice and selflessness. There were mothers who sacrificed their loved ones but their love and kindness became ubiquitous, a love that could not be written on the paper.

    I would like to remember mothers who stood tall as a loud cry against everything that sought to enchain them; they wiped the dust away from their faces to identify the executioners who killed their children. The executioners could not ever conceive of such steadfastness and endurance. These mothers stood firm to expose the oppression of the mullahs’ rule all over the world and attest to the undoubtable truth.

    1. Mother Mossanna (Ferdows Mohebbat): Her three sons, Morteza, Ali and Mostafa, as well as her daughter-in-law, Nahid Rahmani, and her brother, Nasser Rahmani were executed in the 1980s. Nahid and Nasser’s bodies were thrown into Qom’s Lake because the executioners had to get rid of the large number of corpses before the visit by an ICRC delegation at the time. Mother Mossanna was in prison when she heard about the execution of her three sons. Despite the great pain and suffering, she remained proud and stood tall in the history of our country.
    2. Mother Effat Shabestari: She became paralyzed in prison due to Rheumatoid fever. Her daughters, Raf’at and Soghra Kholday, had been executed. Her son, Qassem, who had been arrested in 1980, was hanged eight years later. When she was taken to see the corpse of her son, she turned her head away and said, “I will not take back the gift I have given in the path of God…”
    3. Mother Jahan Ara: She is known in Iran as the mother of three martyrs. Her fourth martyr, Hassan Jahan Ara, has not been mentioned anywhere. Hassan was a member of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran, who was among those massacred in 1988. This mother was not allowed to say anything, anywhere, about Hassan. She had sacrificed her children for Iran’s freedom but had to remain silent and lonely to mourn for Hassan. Yet, it is her silence that is more telling than any other eloquent speech.
    4. Mother Vadood: Vadood had been martyred before the 1980s. She had looked for him everywhere. Once, she was looking for her son in a morgue, when she recognized him by his feet. She started crying out, pushing Vadood’s cold feet to her chest. When she returned to her prison cell, she told her cellmates, “I put his ice-cold feet on my heart and warmed them up.”

    This is the story of how we were united as humans to watch the rainbow in spring, to feel the pride of mountains and the glory of the sea.

    In those years, when our mothers were suffering in agony, their eyes were filled with kindness and their silence was a cry which called on the world for solidarity.

    Since then until now, I have been turning the pages of my memoirs in anticipation of this moment when the truth of the resistance of these mothers and fathers is narrated, those who did not fear the cold and dark days of oppression, and their strength overwhelms us.

    They were the ones who continued the movement for freedom and equality in Iran. They have been the hope of our nation. The philosophy of their lives and deaths, gave meaning to Iran’s history. They became beacons who show the way towards freedom and a principled life.

    Your cries will not go unanswered. Our call for justice today, is the answer to your cries. There will come a day when we can feel the warmth of the sun of love, hope and justice; a day when prison, torture, and execution will become a fable and a day when Iran will feel your presence.

    Maryam Akbari Monfared – Evin – August 2017

    Source: National Council of Resistance of Iran – Women’s Committee website:

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/articles/4181-sufferings-of-mothers-of-pmoi-martyrs

    via #Iran: A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison — iranarabspring

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    • bluemoone 5:47 am on August 12, 2017 Permalink

      These stories are so sad they rip the heart right out of you. To be imprisoned and separated by those you love simply for voicing an opinion because you wanted to make a better world for them. Torturous.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 6:18 am on August 12, 2017 Permalink

      Yes, you’re right Danielle, unfortunately these stories there are a lot in Iran, especially you know Mullahs are misogyny, therefore, repression and torture in relation to women in Iran are more intense. Thanks for comments and thank you very much for your great and humanitarian feelings.

      Liked by 1 person

  • Masoud Dalvand 10:49 am on August 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Maryam Akbari Monfared, , ,   

    Political prisoner, Maryam Akbari Monfared, seeks justice over Iran’s 1988 Massacre 

    In October 2016, Iranian political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared took the unprecedented bold move of filing an official complaint with the Prosecutor General of Tehran over the arbitrary execution of her brother and sister during the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran. She did so on 15 October 2016 from the Women’s Ward of Tehran’s notorious Evin Prison.

    مريم اكبري منفرد

    Ms. Akbari Monfared’s 15 October 2016 complaint read in part: “My brother Abdolreza and my sister Roqieh were executed on an unknown date during the summer of 1988. They were both tried by the Revolutionary Court and sentenced to prison terms. They were deprived of their right to have a lawyer to represent them. Abdolreza was arrested when he was only 17 for selling Mojahed publication (affiliated to the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran – PMOI or MEK). He was sentenced to three years imprisonment in 1980, but the authorities refused to release him after he completed his prison term until he was finally executed in 1988.

    Just a day later, on 16 October 2016, Ms. Akbari-Monfared published an open letter stating her demands in her quest to obtain justice for her loved ones who perished during the 1988 massacre.

    On 30 October 2016, Ms. Akbari-Monfared filed a follow up complaint with the Judiciary demanding an investigation to discover the identities of the perpetrators of the 1988 massacre.

     On 3 November 2016, a group of political prisoners in Gohardasht (Rajai-Shahr) Prison in Karaj issued a statement in support of Ms. Akbari-Monfared.

    Also on 3 November 2016, Amnesty International issued an Urgent Action appeal stating that prisoner of conscience Maryam Akbari Monfared, who is serving a 15-year sentence in Tehran’s Evin Prison, is being denied access to medical treatment and is facing reprisals after filing a formal complaint that seeks an official investigation into the mass killings of political prisoners, including her siblings, in the summer of 1988.

    On 10 November 2016, Sara Jafari-Hatam, the daughter of Maryam Akbari-Monfared, wrote to the UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Iran Ms. Asma Jahangir over the plight of her imprisoned mother.

    Ms. Akbari-Monfared’s case continues to draw domestic and international attention.

    Source: Justice for Victims of 1988 Massacre in Iran (JVMI) website 

    via Political prisoner, Maryam Akbari Monfared, seeks justice over #Iran’s #1988Massacre — iranarabspring

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:19 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Maryam Akbari Monfared,   

    The Truth About Iran’s Evin Prison 

    Evin Prison – Tehran, Iran

    By Heshmat Alavi 

    Two months have passed since the May presidential “elections” in Iran that saw the incumbent Hassan Rouhani reach a second term. The pro-Iran appeasement camp in the West went the distance to raise hopes over the hoax of Rouhani rendering major reforms.

    These voices somehow described Rouhani as a “reformist” and completely neglected the over 3,000 executions during his first term as president. Reports from across the country are turning out to be very disturbing, signaling more troubling times to come in reference to human rights violations.

    As fellow Forbes contributor Ellen R. Wald reported, “On July 16, news came out that an American graduate student at Princeton University named Xiyue Wang had been sentenced to 10 years in an Iranian prison for ‘espionage.’”

    This is Iran again resorting to old tactics of taking Westerners as hostage, mainly dual citizens, to be used as bargaining chips in advancing objectives and politics in negotiations with interlocutors.

    Another practice the regime in Tehran will continue is sending scores to the gallows. The Iranian opposition National Council of Resistance of Iran issued a report recently indicating 57 individuals have been executed across Iran in the beginning of July alone.

    Reports from inside Iran also indicate nearly 120 inmates held in a prison west of Tehran are on the verge of execution. These hangings are planned for the next few weeks, their families say citing authorities, and the sentences of at least 13 individuals are to be implemented soon.

    These alarming reports have all arrived only after a recent tour launched by the mullahs for dozens of foreign ambassadors to visit the notorious Evin Prison located in the hilltops of northern Tehran.

    But of course, no human rights organization or international prison expert were invited, only selected areas of the prison were shown, and merely hand-picked images were provided to the media to depict a highly peaceful environment and go against any claims of rights violations.

    This PR show in Evin, with its history of atrocities, was coupled with Iranian state media outlets pumping reports claiming the jail being upgraded to state-of-the-art conditions.

    Iranian authorities went the distance to showcase specific facilities provided only to rich inmates behind bars for financial crimes. These areas included a gym, an in-house beauty salon, a library and also a restaurant.

    What needs clarification to the outside world is the fact that Evin, along with many other prisons, has a dark history of widespread executions, tortures, and inhumane and unbearable conditions, to say the least. The regime in Iran, with a track record of 63 UN condemnations of human rights violations, is hardly in any position to claim of providing inmates with adequate conditions.

    If Iran truly intends to be transparent, why not begin permitting all international human rights organizations unlimited access to any and all areas of each and every single prison across the country?

    Following this orchestrated tour, Human Rights Watch made a call to Tehran seeking access for rights groups to these prisons. HRW is among many similar entities seeking access to Evin as the facility has been closed to human rights investigators representing independent international and national organizations.

    While there is no expectation for Iran to begin allowing any honest visits, two female political prisoners wrote an open letter explaining the atrocities they endured in Evin.

    Golrokh Iraee and Atena Daemi

    Political prisoners Golrokh Iraee and Atena Daemi described ”solitary cells with no windows, ventilation and lavatory,” “dungeons and dark interrogation rooms,” and “cells known as graves” in Evin.

    Why did this international delegation not visit the women’s ward of Evin where female political prisoners like themselves are held, they asked. Their letter goes on to explain how ward 4 of this prison was renovated by the inmates transferred to solitary confinement on the very day of the ambassadors’ visit.

    Mrs. Maryam Akbari Monfared, another political prisoner whose three brothers and sister were executed during the 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners across Iran, also wrote an extensive open letter as she spends her eighth year behind bars in Evin. Having experienced a variety of Iran’s jails for decades, Monfared wrote, “I’ve witnessed with my own eyes the devaluation of human and humanity” and experienced atrocities also in Shahre-Ray and Gohardasht prisons.

    “Prison food was so little that hungry inmates were forced to collect the residue of other food trays as well as the food which was left on the ground,” she explains.

    “I saw an eleven-year-old girl who was sent into exile from a children correction center to Gohardasht prison so as to be punished… Women and girls who had repeatedly felt the hanging rope around their necks, being on death row for years… Dear ambassadors, who were surprised by what you saw! What you saw was a made-up face of this religious regime’s prisons… I saw inmates on death row in Share-Ray prison, desperately begging their families to talk their judges into implementing their death sentence sooner, as they didn’t wish to stay alive in prison…”

    What needs reminding here is the fact this is a regime founded by the ultraconservative Ruhollah Khomeini who, as the first supreme leader of Iran, authorized the amputation of hands and feet as punishment for thieves.

    All this is more reason for the international community, and especially the Trump administration, to turn up the heat on Iran. The regime in Tehran is resorting to all measures possible to deceive Washington and other parties to delay the blacklisting of the Revolutionary Guards as a major party involved in the mullahs’ crimes against humanity, terrorism and international belligerence.

    In 2009 former US president Barack Obama betrayed universal humane values and chose to side with the mullahs’ regime. And Tehran responded by continuously taking Americans hostage and now putting a show for the Europeans and others.

    Taking strong action against Tehran, similar to the recent sanctions slapped against 18 entities involved with Iran’s support for terrorism and ballistic missile program, will finally signal to the Iranian people that the world has now decided to stand by their side.

    Source: The Truth About Iran’s Evin Prison

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:03 pm on June 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Maryam Akbari Monfared, , , , , ,   

    Iranian women – onerous path to achieve freedom 

    During the past 38 years, Iranian women have been suppressed in both law and practice.

    All the fundamental rights of women have ceaselessly been violated by ideologically motived laws, which are approved by fundamentalist clerics who believe that a woman is worth half of a man. This means, for example, that if a woman dies in an accident, then her family receives only half compensation.

    Tahere-227x300

    Tahere Qurratu l-Ayn

    In historic terms, although clerics have always tried to restrict Iranian women, those women have never given up against Islamic fundamentalist rules. One of the Iranian woman who broke the taboo and challenged all traditional religious laws was Tahere Qurratu l-Ayn. She lived in the nineteenth century and was executed in 1852 by fundamentalist clerics.

    At the moment, women in Iran suffer greatly under the Iranian regime, as the theocracy views them as second-class citizens. They face many restrictions, such as compulsory hijab, to be under the tutelage of a man, gender barriers, and systematic discrimination and marginalisation.

    A few months after the popular revolution in 1979, the founder of “the Islamic Republic”, Khomeini, decreed compulsory hijab in all governmental offices. However, in 1983, the Islamic Consultative Assembly (the parliament) legislated a repressive law that imposed penalties for women who do not observe the compulsory dress code. Despite Hassan Rouhani, a purported “moderate” president, holding office, the Iranian regime has continued to use morality police to enforce this repressive law. For example, few weeks ago, a young woman was run over by police for improper veiling. If a woman resists against the morality police, she will be arrested. According to some reports, a majority of women who are arrested by the morality police are subjected to sexual harassment.

    There is also an exploiter law, which is officially known as Non-compliance. If a woman refuses to have sex with her husband, she can be sentenced by the court. Some fundamentalist clerics say that husbands can and should punish their wives for “such violation”.

    There are other medieval laws in place, such as inheritance and testimony. A woman’s inheritance is half of that of a man’s. The same goes for women’s testimony in a court, as its worth half of a man. This means that there must be at least two women who testify on a matter in the court, if they expect their testimony to be heard and approved.

    For Iran’s religious dictatorship, freedom for women is a red-line. It is a known fact that the clerics do not believe that a woman can or is fit to be a president or a judge. Consequently, the regime’s constitution bars women from standing as a candidate for a presidential election or being a judge.

    Another example of religiously motivated suppression is the suppression of Baha’is. The ruling clerics and their laws consider Baha’is as an enemy of God “Mohareb”. There are many prohibitions against them in the Iranian society, such as an education ban and deprivation of all public service. Many of their leaders are also imprisoned, because they challenge these repressive laws.

    Overall, despite international warnings in recent years, the condition of human rights has gotten worse in Iran. This is proven by the fact that Iran is one of the few countries that have a Special Rapporteur appointed by the United Nations. This Special Rapporteur has the mandate to monitor and report on the human rights situation in the country. The Iranian regime and its allies in the UN used many resources to try to prevent this appointment.

    How the Iranian women resist against mullah’s regime?

    Despite the suppression, the women in Iran continue to protest gender discrimination and challenge the repressive laws. In Iran, women form the core of a historical resistance against the theocracy. Women play a key role in the Iranian opposition group, the People’s Mojahedin Organisation of Iran (PMOI), which terrifies the ruling theocracy. Between 1981 and 1988, tens of thousands of political prisoners were executed. A majority of those killed were members of the Iranian opposition group, officially known as the PMOI. It is obvious that during the massacre, women were a huge portion of the victims. But women are still being arrested for supporting the PMOI and they are being sentenced to long prison sentences as a result.

    maryam-akbari-monfared

    Maryam Akbari-Monfared

    A prisoner of conscience, Maryam Akbari-Monfared, 48, was arrested in December 2009 and is serving a 15 year-prison sentence after being accused of supporting the PMOI. “She is facing reprisals after filing a formal complaint that seeks an official investigation into the mass killings of political prisoners, including her siblings, in the summer of 1988,” according to a statement by Amnesty on November 3, 2016.She was said that her conviction was only because of her family’s role in the PMOI.

    In fact, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), the broader opposition coalition for establishing freedom and democracy in Iran that includes the PMOI, is led by a Muslim woman, Maryam Rajavi, which is unique for the Middle East. This means that Iranian women are at the forefront of the struggle for democracy in Iran.

    She has presented a 10-point democratic platform for the future of Iran that envisions complete gender equality in political and social rights and is committed to the equal participation of women in political leadership. This platform will abolish any form of discrimination against women and the compulsory dress code. It also establishes the separation of the church and the State, prohibiting any form of discrimination against the followers of all religions and denominations.

    This platform represents a viable alternative to the current theocracy and should be recognized and supported by the international community.

    via  Iranian women – onerous path to achieve freedom — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:39 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran Threatens Political Prisoner With Additional Prison Time for Speaking Out Against 1988 Massacre 

     

     

    Liked by 1 person

    The Media Express

    maryam-akbari-monfared Maryam Akbari Monfared

    Maryam Akbari Monfared has been threatened with an additional three-year prison term and exile to a remote prison for her open letters asking about the fate and whereabouts of several thousand political prisoners, including two of her siblings. These individuals were extra judicially executed in 1988.

    Monfared has written several open letters since October 2016, when she filed a formal complaint with the Prosecutor’s Office. She is seeking an official investigation into the 1988 massacre, the location of the mass graves of the executed prisoners, and the identities of the perpetrators.

    However, the authorities have not processed the complaint, but have resorted to using various punitive tactics to silence Monfared. They have refused to take her to medical appointments outside of the prison to receive necessary treatment for her rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid problems. There have also been threats to stop any visits with her family.

    “How…

    View original post 414 more words

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:34 am on January 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Maryam Akbari Monfared, , ,   

    Iran political prisoners suffering from global silence 

    iran-political-prisoners-suffering-from-global-silence

     

    The case of a political prisoner on hunger strike in Iran has recently gained widespread global attention as a campaign for his release went viral with hashtag #saveArash trending worldwide. Iranian authorities are under pressure to release Arash Sadeghi as his conditions grow dire after continuing to protest and refusing any food consumption for over 70 days.

    “A jailed Iranian activist on hunger strike in protest at the detention of his writer wife has taken social media by storm. The hashtag #SaveArash topped Twitter trending on Friday as fellow Iranians and others showed solidarity with Arash Sadeghi,” euronews reported.

    The issue has also prompted Amnesty International to issue an Urgent Action call slamming Tehran’s approach.

    “The Iranian authorities are putting the life of imprisoned human-rights defender Arash Sadeghi at grave risk and should release him and his wife, Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee without further delay,” the renowned human-rights organization demanded.

    Iranian authorities on December 31st ordered a total of $450,000 bail for the temporary release of Sadeghi and his wife. While the property bond for Iraee was delivered the next day, according to the couple’s lawyer, authorities delayed her release citing bureaucratic procedures.

    After the long period Sadeghi has been on hunger strike, with authoritieshindering his access to medical aid, various reports indicate he is “vomiting blood and experiencing severe respiratory, heart, kidney and gastrointestinal problems.”

    In the past few days Iranians have rallied outside Tehran’s notorious Evin Prison, marching and demanding Sadeghi’s release.

    Reports also indicate Hossein Sadeghi, Arash’s father, joined his son’s struggle.

    “…to support my son, I have started my hunger strike since Friday, December 3rd to protest against the authorities,” he announced.

    Following international pressures Iran was forced to temporarily release Iraee on bail, prompting Sadeghi to end his hunger strike.

    Sadeghi is currently behind bars serving a 19-year prison sentence under bogus charges of conspiracy and propaganda against the state. Allegations he denies completely.

    Sadeghi was previously arrested by Iranian authorities for his political activities twice on July 9th and December 23rd of 2009, and again on May 5th, 2014. Each time his family was able to provide the bail for his release. He was last arrested in October 2016 and remains behind bars ever since.

    Iran’s so-called criminal justice system is of callous nature as authorities continue to impose harsh conditions on political prisoners across the country. Many such detainees feel left with no choice other than launching hunger strikes to legally challenge their unjust detentions.

    Already known for its appalling human rights violations, Iran can also be described as home to some of the most atrocious prisons with a large population of political prisoners.

    Unfortunately, Tehran’s mullahs have been able to take advantage of the West’sappeasement policy approach and silence in this regard to place many dissidents behind bars under appalling conditions.

    The case of Maryam Akbari Monfared, another political prisoner behind bars on a 15-year sentence, has also raised grave concerns as authorities continue to deny her access to medical care. Monfared made a call from inside prison demanding senior Iranian officials be held accountable for the summer 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners, mostly members and supporters of Iranian opposition People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK).

    “She is facing reprisals after filing a formal complaint that seeks an official investigation into the mass killings of political prisoners, including her siblings, in the summer of 1988,” Amnesty warned.

    It is high time for Iran to be the subject of strong condemnation and liability by the international community, and for the regime to understand it must comply by international standards in relation to voices of dissent.

    Otherwise, Iran will consider the international community’s silence and inaction a green light to continue pressuring political prisoners and increase its already horrific execution spree.

    Source : Iran political prisoners suffering from global silence

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:28 pm on November 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Maryam Akbari Monfared, , ,   

    Maryam Rajavi: The World Should Act Against Iran Regime, Saudi Arabia’s Daily Al-Riyadh 

    maryam-rajavi%d8%8c-call-for-justice

    The Saudi Newspaper, Al-Riyadh reported on Monday 28th November 2016 that in respect to the summit held in Paris: ‘the president of the National Council of Resistance of Iran ( NCRI ), Maryam Rajavi insists that the US policy was disastrous for the Iranian people over the past 16 years and this …

    Source: Maryam Rajavi: The World Should Act Against Iran Regime, Saudi Arabia’s Daily Al-Riyadh

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:50 am on November 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Maryam Akbari Monfared,   

    I support Maryam Akbari Monfared 

    My dear friends of Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) have sent me the following text and I join their campaign to support Maryam Akbari Monfared.
    Amnesty International issued a statement on November 3, 2016, objecting denial of medical treatment to Maryam Akbari Monfared imprisoned in Evin Prison. The urgent action reads in part:
    PRISONER DENIED TREATMENT FOR FILING A COMPLAINT
    Prisoner of conscience Maryam Akbari Monfared, who is serving a 15-year sentence in Tehran’s Evin Prison, is being denied access to medical treatment. She is facing reprisals after filing a formal complaint that seeks an official investigation into the mass killings of political prisoners, including her siblings, in the summer of 1988.
    Iranian officials are refusing to take prisoner of conscience Maryam Akbari Monfared to her scheduled medical appointments outside prison in order to receive treatment for her rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid problems. The Associate Prosecutor  of Evin Prison told her family on 24 October that her medical care arrangements have been cancelled because she has become too “brazen”. The comment was made in reference to a formal complaint filed by Maryam Akbari Monfared from inside prison on 18 October, seeking an official investigation into the mass summary executions in 1988 of an estimated 5,000 (actually 30,000) political prisoners, including her brother and sister, the location of mass graves where their bodies were buried, and the identity of the perpetrators involved. The denial of access to medical care follows other forms of reprisals against her, including an order from the Office of Prosecutor to stop prison visits from her family, and threats to bring fresh criminal charges against her.
    Maryam Akbari Monfared was arrested in the early morning of 31 December 2009. For the next five months, her family remained unaware of her fate and whereabouts. In May 2010, she appeared before a Revolutionary Court in Tehran, which sentenced her to 15 years in prison on several charges including “enmity against God” (moharebeh) through membership in the banned opposition group known as the PMOI. The judicial proceedings in her case were grossly unfair and the conviction was based solely on the fact that she had made phone calls to her siblings who are members of PMOI and had visited them once near the PMOI-run Camp Ashrafin Iraq. She was held in solitary confinement during the first 43 days after her arrest, where she underwent intense interrogations and was denied access to a lawyer throughout. She met her state-appointed lawyer for the first time at her trial, which was limited to one brief session. She was never provided with a reasoned judgement, setting out the evidence and legal reasoning relied upon to convict her. Maryam Akbari Monafred’s husband has said that during her trial session, the judge told her “she was paying for the activities of her brother and sister with the PMOI”. Her appeals were dismissed in a summary fashion with no reasons provided.
    #Justice4Maryam is the campaign we are focusing on and you can get to know Maryam Akbari Monfared: https://youtu.be/IYGNAJ8_PQg

    via I support Maryam Akbari Monfared — eugateblog

     
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