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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:40 am on 29 Jan 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IRGC, , Mahan Air,   

    The IRGC is a corrupt mafia of terrorism and crimes in Iran, the Middle East and the entire world. 


    Masoud Dalvand(Freedom Star): In order to know more about the terrorist activities of the Iranian regime in the region of the Middle East and in the whole world, in addition to missile activities and support for militias and terrorist groups, the seemingly economic and commercial activities of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) must be carefully considered.

    The IRGC intervenes like an octopus in all security, political, military, social, Internet and economic sectors, because it protects the dictatorship of the mullahs from overthrow by the Iranian people.

    Most of the major oil and economic projects in Iran are under the control of this terrorist and corrupt force. Money from economic activities by the IRGC is spent on missile projects and the continuation of proxy wars in Syria, Yemen, Iraq, Lebanon and Afghanistan, and the repression of uprisings of the Iranian people inside the country.

    An important part of these funds is also paid to the accounts of the senior IRGC commanders because they are all corrupt and thieves. In one word, the IRGC is a corrupt mafia of assassinations and crimes in Iran, the Middle East and the entire world.

    One of the companies owned by this terrorist force, is Mahan Air(an airlines company), which was recently banned by Germany and the United States. This so-called airline has its main task of sending weapons and militias and members of the IRGC to Syria to continue the war and protect the bloodthirsty dictatorship of Bashar al-Assad.

    The following article provides readers with information on this airline owned by the IRGC’s terrorist force. I invite you to read this article. Published on the official website of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK).

    A look at Mahan Air, the IRGC-owned Iranian airline spreading death and destruction

    Mahan airline industry
    Mahan airline industry

    Analysis by PMOI/MEK

    Jan. 28, 2019 – Just a few days ago, Germany announced that Iranian airline Mahan Air is no longer allowed to enter German airspace. In response, the Iranian regime’s minister of roads and urban development Mohammad Eslami said, “All the companies and airline industry of the Islamic Republic are sanctioned, and Mahan Air is among them.”

    On January 21, Reuters quoted German sources that Mahan Air’s license for flying to German has been canceled. According to Reuters, the German federal government cited “safety problems” and the possibility of Iranian use of Mahan Air for “military purposes” as the reasons for its decision.

    In a January 21 meeting between EU foreign ministers, German FM Heiko Maas said that Iranian Mahan Air transports weapons and soldiers to war-torn areas in Syria.

    In a separate statement, German foreign ministry announced, “this decision has been taken in light of the recent sanctions agreed upon by the EU Council after the [terroristic] developments in France and Denmark.”

    In June last year, the Iranian intelligence ministry plotted a failed attempt to plant a bomb in a grand gathering by the Iranian Resistance. At least three Iranians were arrested in connection with the attack, one of them an Iranian diplomat named Asadollah Assadi, from the Iranian regime’s embassy in Vienna, Austria.

    Considering the recent developments, the foreign commission of the National Council of Resistance of Iran published a detailed report of Mahan Airs past record and its connections with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

    Mahan Air, while registered as a private company, has had vast links to the highest levels of Iranian officials from day one and has benefited a semi-official status of state-sponsorship throughout its life.

    The Mola Almowaheddin institute, which describes itself as a charity, owns 100 percent of Mahan Air’s stock.

    Mahan Air was founded in the city of Kerman, the capital of Kerman province in Iran. Mahan is the name of a small city 35 kilometers from Kerman. Ata’ollah Mohajerani, the minister of culture and guidance during the presidency of Mohammad Khatami, chose the name for Mahan Air.

    Mahan Air was founded shortly after the Quds Force, IRGC’s foreign terrorist arm, was established.

    Virtually all Mahan Air’s decision makers and major players are members of the IRGC and commanders of Qassem Soleimani’s Quds Force. A short list of some of them follows:

    • Hamid Arabnejad, chairman and CEO of Mahan Air, is a very close friend to Qassem Soleimani
    • Hamid Aslani, currently advisor to Hamid Arabnejad, is a Brigadier general of the IRGC. He is a former member of IRGC’s SWAT teams and later became head of the human resources in IRGC. At the same time, he became the HR head of Mahan Air.
    • Hamid Asgari, heads Mahan Air’s catering through a company named Arman. Formerly, he was one of the commanders of IRGC’s 41st division, known as the Tharallah Division. He is close to Qassem Soleimani.

    Through connections in the highest levels of Iraq’s government, particularly Hadi Al-Amiri, former Iraqi minister of transportation and head of the Badr Organization, Qassem Soleimani organized Mahan Air’s flights over Iraqi airspace to transport weapons and equipment to Syria.

    On a daily basis, Mahan Air conducts flights from Tehran, Mashhad, Isfahan, Shiraz, and Abadan to Damascus over Iraq to transport weapons, equipment and fighters to aid the regime of Bashar al-Assad.

    In groups of approximately 200 individuals each, Mahan Air transports militias, including Afghan nationals who have been hired by IRGC, to Damascus.

    Iraqi militias affiliated with the Quds Force, are transported from Iraq’s Basra to Iran’s Abadan by bus, and from there flown to Damascus by Mahan Air.

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    • wizzymedpower 7:18 am on 30 Jan 2019 Permalink

      It is well in Iran.. Prayers are going on. God will intervene with His power to bring lasting peace in the Nation of Iran Amen!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 6:34 pm on 31 Jan 2019 Permalink

      Amen! thank you so much dear friend. God bless you.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 6:31 pm on 3 Dec 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IRGC, , , , , , ,   

    NCRI Reveals Details of Tehran’s Terror Machine in the West 

    NCRI Reveals Details of Tehran_s Terror Machine in the West

    Alireza Jafarzadeh, the Deputy Director of the National Council of Resistance of Iran-U.S. Representative Office (NCRI-US)

    Washington, DC – On Friday, November 2, 2018, Alireza Jafarzadeh, the Deputy Director of the National Council of Resistance of Iran-U.S. Representative Office (NCRI-US), held a press conference to unveil the terror network of the Iranian regime and its role in a chain of terrorist plots in Europe and the United States, revealing the specific regime officials involved in the planning and execution of terrorist operations.

    Jafarzadeh drew attention to the fact that the recent wave of terror plots were not the result of some rogue elements within the regime, but rather were decided and planned in the highest levels and carried out “under the supervision of [the Special Affairs Office of the Supreme Leader] after Khamenei personally approved them.”

    Stating that there has been a significant surge in terrorist operations in the US and Europe since 2017 and that the regime has revived its terror structure, Jafarzadeh said the regime carried out 2 terror operations in Europe in 2017, but has carried out 8 terrorist plots in the United States and Europe so far in 2018. He said that 4 Iranian diplomats have been implicated this year for involvement of such terror operations and that four major operations were carried out since March. “Tehran has plotted one major terror operation in Europe and the United States every six weeks from March to September 2018,” said Jafarzadeh.

    NCRI-US deputy director also explained the significant role Tehran’s Foreign Ministry has been playing as enablers and facilitators of terrorist operations and its culprits. He said that Tehran’s embassy in Vienna has acted as the main hub for a host of intelligence operations in Europe for the past several years. As other embassies played the same role in a host of terror operations over the past three decades.

    The primary target of the regime remains the officials of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) and its pivotal member, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI) also known as the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK). Just in the past six months, there have been three plots specifically targeting NCRI and MEK, everywhere from the MEK’s members in Albania in March to the annual Iran freedom rally in Paris in June and even within the United States in August.

    While the regime intended these operations as a show of strength and intimidation or even eradication of the alternative to this regime, they reveal a deeper fear about the insecurity of the mullahs’ hold on power, particularly in light of the widespread anti-government protests that have shaken Iran for the past year.

    Mr. Jafarzadeh commented on the cause for the renewed wave of terror when he said, “For its survival, the regime looks to terrorism against its organized opposition as it plays the key role in the uprising in Iran.”

    Mr. Jafarzadeh concluded the conference by detailing a list of steps that Western governments could take to curb the Iranian regime’s aggression, including prosecuting all Iranian agents in the U.S. and Europe, expelling Iranian terrorist diplomats from Europe and shutting down Tehran’s embassies in European capitals and finally sanctioning all entities involved in planning, training, facilitating and funding the Iranian regime’s terrorism.
    NCRI-US

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:29 pm on 12 Jul 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , IRGC, ,   

    What should be done about the Iran’s government-sponsored terrorism 

    The Iran government sponsors terrorism

    Iran, July 11, 2018 – On June 30, as thousands of Iranians and political figures from five continents convened at Paris for the annual Iranian opposition Free Iran rally, the Belgian police arrested a group of terrorists in Brussels. At the same time, the German police arrested Assadollah Assadi, an Iranian regime diplomat. Other undisclosed arrests took place in neighboring European countries, all linked to a complicated terror plot against the Iranian opposition gathering in Paris.

    This is part of a broader confrontation between the Iranian opposition and the regime and has now assumed a much larger context.

    The U.S. government, whose distinguished citizens and politicians were speaking at the Iranian opposition gathering and could have been the victim of the Iranian regime’s terrorist plot, has declared that it will be pursuing this matter and it won’t go unanswered. Europeans should also make their move. European taxpayers should know about the Iranian regime’s terrorist activities in their countries and decide what to do with its diplomatic facilities, which have become the centers of planning and staging terror plots.

    While this latest terror attempt has been in the headlines for several days, the Iranian regime has a long history of attempting and carrying out similar operations in foreign countries. In fact, in the same rally that the regime was going to the be target of the Iranian regime’s failed terror attempt, Louis Freeh, former director of the FBI, reminded the crowd of another violent terrorist attack that had been hatched in Tehran and carried out by the Iranian regime’s operatives.

    “Although, things are changing around and under the regime, the regime’s agenda of terrorism has not changed,” Freeh said in his speech. “Last Monday was the 22nd anniversary of the IRGC Saudi Hezbollah bombing of the US barracks in Khobar Tower. Since then, the regime has continued to export terrorism in Yemen, in Argentina, in Syria and all around the world. That has not changed. What has changed, however, is what’s going on in the hearts and minds and on the streets and bazaars of Iran…”

    In 1996, after the bombing of the Khobar towers, Louis Freeh, who at the time was the director of the FBI, dispatched an investigation team. They soon learned that the persons behind the terrorist attack had been trained, armed and financed by the IRGC. However, since the dominant policy of the U.S. administration was rapprochement and appeasement toward the Iranian regime, the matter was not pursued.

    Another notable episode was the bombing of the U.S. Marines barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, again the doing of the IRGC and Hezbollah. During the attack, which took place on October 23, 1983, 241 American and 58 French military personnel were killed along with 6 civilians.

    Four years later, on July 20, 1987, Mohsen Rafiqdoust, the former IRGC Minister, officially stated, “Americans know that the explosive that combined with that ideology and sent 400 American soldiers and officers to hell, both the ideology and the explosive material came from Iran.”

    Some of the other terrorist attacks conducted by the Iranian regime abroad include the following:

    • Assassination Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou, the leader of the Kurdistan Democratic party, in Vienna, Austria, in 1989
    • The assassination of Shapour Bakhtiar, the last Prime Minister of the Shah regime, in Suresnes, France 1991
    • The assassination of Kazem Rajavi, NCRI member, and brother of Iranian opposition leader Massoud Rajavi, in Coppet, Switzerland, in 1990
    • The assassination of Kurdish opposition leaders in Berlin, Germany, in 1992
    • The assassination of Mohammad Hossein Naghdi, NCRI member, in Rome, Italy, in 1993
    • The assassination of Zahra Rajabi, NCRI member, in Istanbul, Turkey, in 1996

    These are just some of the terror attacks that the Iranian regime has conducted in European countries in the past decades. There are also several failed assassination attempts, and the regime was also involved in bombings in London and Paris.

    Disappointingly, in most cases, European governments have let the Iranian regime’s terrorists off the hook because of their goals to appease Tehran.

    Some of the diplomat terrorists of the Iranian regime in European countries include the following:

    • Alireza Moayeri, the regime’s ambassador to France and UN
    • Vahid Gorji, Iranian terrorist in France
    • Massoud Hendi, Iranian terrorist in France
    • Kazem Darabi
    • Ali Vakilrad
    • Fereidoun Pourahmadi
    • Mohammad Azadi

    	Ali Vakilrad , Fereidoun Pourahmadi & Mohammad Azadi

    Ali Vakilrad , Fereidoun Pourahmadi & Mohammad Azadi

    	Left to right Mohsen Rafiqdoust, Momed Saleh Al-Hosseini, Aniss Naqash, Mosen Rezaei

    Left to right Mohsen Rafiqdoust, Mohammed Saleh Al-Hosseini, Aniss Naqash, Mohsen Rezaei

    The group that assassinated Kazem Rajavi were well-known diplomats of the Iranian regime. They had traveled to Geneva with their diplomatic documents and returned to Tehran after carrying out the assassination.

    On June 17, 2004, the Tribune De Geneve newspaper published an article in which it identified a bank account with a $200 million balance, which might have been used to fund 400 terrorist attacks in Europe. According to TDG, the account was also linked to the terrorist bombing of the AMIA building in Buenos Aires in 1994, which killed 86 people and injured 200 others. The account was used to fund a team of 13 people, who had been dispatched to Switzerland to assassinate Kazem Rajavi.

    So this all brings us back to the first question: What must be done with the government-sponsored terrorism of the Iranian regime? As far as the people of Iran and taxpayers in western countries are concerned, the answer is clear: Every center and facility that gives the Iranian regime a diplomatic cover to carry out its evil terrorist plots must be closed down.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 2:32 pm on 29 Jun 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IRGC, , , Panel Discussion on Iran   

    Panel Discussion on Iran: IRGC and Meddling in the Region 

    Panel discution Policy on Iran

    Panel Discussion on Iran: IRGC and Meddling in the Region

    Moderator: Walid Phares, Expert, global terrorism and Middle Eastern affairs

    Second panel discussion on Iran starts: IRGC and meddling in the region, moderated by Mr. Walid Phares, Expert, global terrorism and Middle Eastern affairs.

    Raid Yassine, Ambassador of Yemen in Paris, former Foreign Minister of Yemen:

    The reason the Iranian regime meddles in the region is instituted in its constitution. This highlights the fact that they will continue what they have been doing.

    Deputy Commander of the Quds Force said Yemen is more important than Lebanon. They infiltrated a huge country with 27 million people.

    We have been receiving aid and support from Saudi Arabia, Egypt , etc. We did not receive any support from Iran . Instead, we discovered spy networks. In January 2013.

    Ret. General Charles Wald, former Deputy Commander of U.S. European Command: “The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) has not moderated the behavior of the Iranian regime. The JCPOA was pretty much a failure.”

    “Security of the Iranian regime depends on the export of revolution by that regime. Currently, Iran’s regional ambitions constitute its control over Syria. They provide troops for Assad.”

    U.S. Defense Secretary Mattis accused Iran of trying to influence the Iraqi elections. In Lebanon , Iran is accused of making at least two underground factories for manufacture of missiles.

    James Conway, General (Ret.), former Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps.: We have been using the term “meddling” for years, but I think that word no longer satisfies. Iran is today calling the shots in all Middle Eastern capitals.

    I have seen their (regime) activities described with terms “interdiction”, “subversion”, “cancer” and even “takeover.”

    Soleimani sees his mission in Syria as two folds: One is to support the Syrian regime and that includes the survival of the Assad regime. Syria has been Iran’s best ally for years and is crucial to this whole concept of the Shiite Crescent.

    Frédéric Encel, writer and scholar of geopolitics specialized on the Middle East.

    Mohammed al-Sulami, Head of International Institute for Iranian Studies · Yves Thréard, Editorialist in Le Figaro.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:14 pm on 15 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , IRGC, , ,   

    Exposing Iran’s Latest Cyber warfare Methods and Threat Actors 

    Cover-of-the-Cyber-Repression-just-front-e1518455600797

    The cyber security briefing was held at the NCRI office in Washington, DC, on Thursday, February 15, 2018.

    A new report, “Iran: Cyber Repression, How the IRGC Uses Cyberwarfare To Preserve the Theocracy,” was released as well.

    This manuscript demonstrates how the Iranian regime, under the supervision and guidance of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and the Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS), has employed new cyberwarfare and tactics in a desperate attempt to counter the growing dissent inside the country, in particular the nationwide uprising that erupted in late December 2017. NCRI-US reveals information about the regime’s new wave of cyber repression, and key players involved. This book shows how a domestic mobile apps marketplace modeled after Google Play, is supervised by the IRGC to distribute spyware-enabled apps. IRGC front companies are developing spyware-enabled apps for cyber-surveillance and repression. Ironically, some of these apps are available on Google Play, Apple Store, and GitHub, potentially exposing millions of users worldwide to the regime’s spyware and surveillance.

    You can Obtain new publication of NCRI-US “Iran: Cyber Repression, How the IRGC How the IRGC Uses Cyberwarfare to Preserve the Theocracy” on the following link:

     

    NCRIUS1

    NCRIUS2

    NCRIUS4

    Alireza Jafarzadeh

    Apps programmed by the IRGC, like Wispi, Mobogram, and Telegram Farsi, can all be found on the Apple App Store.

    “If you download them, you are doomed.”

    Info graphic-on-IRGC Cyber:

    infographic-on-irgc-cyber

    Reflections of this press conference on some of international press:

    The Washington Times

    The Sun

    cnsnews.com

    Daily Star

    For watching NCRI_US press conference on cyber repression of the Iranian regime, please click on the following link:

    https://www.pscp.tv/NCRIUS/1jMJgqVreYmKL

    Video of the conference:

    Iran Cyber repression

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:35 am on 24 Jan 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IRGC, ,   

    Iran Regime Is a Threat to Us All 

    Iran threat

    Houthis Terrorists supported by the Iranian regime

    NCRI – The Iranian Regime was founded on the principal of exporting their revolution- including their widely discredited interpretation of Islam- to the rest of the world. They have never given up on this idea and continue to pursue world domination through the use of nuclear weapons, ballistic missiles, and proxy militias to fight for them.

    The Iran- sponsored Houthi militia in Yemen sought to overthrow the internationally recognised government, and replace them with former president Ali Abdullah Saleh. The Houthis captured the capital of Sana’a, and the Iranian Regime rejoiced at controlling another capital in the Middle East, but faced opposition from a Saudi-coalition, which stepped up the proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia.

    Bruce Riedel, director of the Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution, stated: “Iran is gradually increasing its support for the Houthi rebels in Yemen. Rather than eliminating the Iranian presence in the country, the Saudi-led war is giving Tehran the opportunity to become more influential there than ever. The Houthis … will need Tehran’s backing more as the stalemate continues … A war designed to weaken Iran is actually helping it against its regional rival.”

    In November, the Houthis attempted to fire a ballistic missile towards Riyadh International Airport in November, which was the first missile to be aimed at such a densely-populated area.

    The Iranian-made missile was thankfully destroyed in flight by Saudi forces before it could do any damage, but it is clear that the Iranian Regime at the very least supplied the missile and quite possibly order the attack. It is believed that the missile was disassembled, smuggled into Yemen, and reassembled by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and its Lebanese-based proxy Hezbollah.

    The US considers this attack as evidence that Iran has violated two United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions on the Yemen crisis and Iran’s missile program.

    The Houthis have since followed this up another attempted missile attack on Riyadh in December, but this was once again thwarted by the Saudis. However, the Iran-backed Houthi warned that these attacks mark a new chapter, because now Saudi palaces, military bases, and oil facilities, are within missile range.

    Iran’s use of proxies is widespread in the Middle East. Iran armed Shiite militants in Bahrain as part of an effort to bring the country back under Iran’s control- despite Bahrain gaining independence nine years before the Regime took power- and in November, the militants created an explosion on a major oil pipeline in Bahrain to slow the supply of oil to Saudi Arabia.

    With the help of their proxies, Iran does not need to get their hands dirty and have widely escaped the consequences of their actions.

    When the US threatened sanctions against Iran for noncompliance with the nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA), IRGC Major General Mohammed Ali Jafari threatened to launch ballistic missiles on any US military base within 1,200 miles (the range of their ballistic missiles). Ironically, Iran’s use of ballistic missiles is one of the things that Donald Trump sees as a violation of the JCPOA.

    Following those comments, US Representative Ron DeSantis responded: “Iran’s behaviour… has only seemed to get worse. … The present course is untenable and Iran’s threatening behaviour is likely to increase in frequency.”

    In 1983, Iran attacked a US Marines barracks in Lebanon and killed 241 American service members using its terrorist proxy Hezbollah. There is no reason to suspect that they would not do so again.

    Iran also threatened France after various French politicians raised concerns about the Iranian missile program, Iranian expansionism, and called for a political dialogue on the subjects.

    IRGC Brigadier General Hossein Salami said: “If Europe wants to turn into a threat, we will increase the range of our missiles… we have no limitations for the range of our missiles in technological terms.”

    Anthony Chibarirwe wrote on The Trumpet: “These [European leaders were] exercising caution even in their efforts to preserve the JCPOA nuclear deal with Iran. But they aren’t doing so because they trust Iran or because they want it to go nuclear; they are doing so because they distrust and fear this belligerent Iran so much that they choose appeasement rather than confrontation. But their idealist school of thought will not solve the problem.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:46 am on 21 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , IRGC, , Pakistani Shias,   

    Pakistani Shias being trained by Iran for a regional fighting force 

    Dubai [UAE], Dec 20 (ANI): Very little is written in Pakistan about the Zainebiyoun, a brigade comprising of Pakistani Shia fighters trained by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corp (IRGC) and currently fighting for the Assad regime in Syria.

    The recruits for the brigade are largely drawn from Shia Hazaras originally from Balochistan and the Shias of Parachinar and Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa.

    According to sources, the number of Pakistanis deployed in this brigade could be as high as 1000.

    The brigade, named after Zainab, the granddaughter of the Prophet Muhammad, has been largely operating in the Syrian cities of Damascus, Aleppo, Daraa and Hama. Their primary task is to protect Shia shrines from attacks of the ISIS.

    Though the Zainebiyoun was formed around 2015, Pakistani Shias were being inducted into the Fatemiyoun from 2013 onwards.

    The Fatemiyoun Division, comprising mainly of Afghan Shias, has been fighting alongside Syrian government forces against the ISIS from 2013 onwards. In fact, after the Hizbullah of Lebanon, the Fatemiyoun perhaps has the largest presence of foreign fighters in Syria, estimated to be 20,000 Afghan fighters.

    Interviews of Afghan Shias who have returned to Afghanistan after serving in the Fatemiyoun in Syria, indicate that Iran provides military training to Afghan and Pakistani Shiites both in Iran and inside Syria. The IRGC reportedly provides a four-week, pre-deployment training to Zainebiyouan and Fatemiyoun combatants at ‘special training bases’ inside Iran. There are known to be nine such training camps in Iran. Each combatant is lured into this brigade with the hope of being granted a permanent residency of Iran, a hefty monthly pay of USD 1200 per month and payment for education of the combatants’ children, in case of his death.

    As per accounts of active members of the Zainebiyoun, many of them were driven to join the brigade and take up the Shia cause outside their own country after they witnessed the persecution of Shias in Pakistan.

    While the urban elite Shias remain unharmed because of their class and alignment with the Pakistani military establishment, the vast majority of the poor, disadvantaged Shia Muslims in Pakistan remain victims of frequent suicide attacks and target killing by ISI-sponsored groups like the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) and other radical Sunni groups.

    Iran has been using this sense of alienation among the middle class and poor Shias in Pakistan, to project itself as the sole protector of Shias worldwide. The arrival of the ISIS has allowed Iran to use its Shia militias to gain a foothold in several countries of the Middle East. There is little doubt that once the ISIS threat in Syria & Iraq is over, these militias or proxy armies will be used by Iran to further its geo-political ambitions in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

    When Pakistani COAS Gen Qamar Bajwa visited Iran recently, it is unlikely that he considered it important to raise this issue with the Iranian leaders. However, if Iran’s proactive policy in the Middle East is any indication, Pakistan may soon have to deal with Iran trained Shia proxies in its western borders. (ANI)

    Source: Pakistani Shias being trained by Iran for a regional fighting force

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:44 am on 20 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , IRGC, , , , ,   

    Understanding Washington’s Fast-Evolving Policy on Iran – Analysis 

     

    On the doorstep of US President Donald Trump’s first National Security Strategy speech, the administration launched an unprecedented campaign of pinpointing the Iranian regime as the crosshairs on the epicenter of all extremism causing havoc across the Middle East, writes  Heshmat Alavi in Al Arabiya English.

    This comes following a Wall Street Journal article explaining how in the post-ISIS world Washington will begin pinpointing its focus and resources on the larger and more dangerous threat posed by Tehran, Alavi, a dissident writer and human rights activist, wrote on Monday, December 18, 2017.

    The Trump administration has made it clear that a wide array of destructive policies adopted by Tehran have become unacceptable, the article said.

    Described as a “first” by Reuters, last Thursday US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley displayed a detailed exhibition of Iranian equipment used to arm Yemen’s Houthi militias – long known to be backed by Iran’s regime – and thus, to destabilize the region, especially its archrival, Saudi Arabia.

    “We are not just focused on the nuclear program,” Haley said during a press conference at a US Department of Defense hangar where the Iranian equipment were placed before the media. “We’re also taking a hard look at Iran’s ballistic missile program, its arms exports, and its support for terrorists, proxy fighters and dictators.”

    The Iranian regime can also be described as the facilitator, and maybe even the godfather, of a slate of malign practices rendering suffering across the Arabian Peninsula, leading to the Levant and eastward to Central Asia.

    “It’s hard to find a terrorist group in the Middle East that does not have Iran’s fingerprints all over it,” Haley continued, adding how this regime is “fanning the flames” of conflict.

    For decades the US State Department has considered Iran the world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism.

    “We may actually be on the verge of meaningful and long overdue measures against Tehran on this very important and vital subject,” the article said.

    Advocates of engagement vis-à-vis the Iranian regime are accusing the US administration of trailing the path of launching a war with Iran.

    “Their intentions are far from preventing the US from entering a new war, but to protect Tehran from any strong measures, including international sanctions that target the regime and actually benefit the people by weakening the ruling system,” the article added.

    It went on to say, as emphasized by Ambassador Haley, it is high time for the international community to take decisive action, such as crippling sanctions targeting the regime and its belligerent institutions, to finally bring an end to what has become “a global threat.”

    The article added:

    The Iranian opposition National Council of Resistance of Iran, known for blowing the whistle on Tehran’s clandestine nuclear program, indicates how a “firm policy hinges on the following practical measures:

    • Evicting the IRGC and its proxy militias from Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and Afghanistan, and preventing the transfer of Iran’s weaponry and troops to these countries;
    • Imposing comprehensive sanctions on Iran and the IRGC, especially preventing their access to the global banking system;
    • Referring Iran’s human rights violations dossier, particularly the 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners, to The International Criminal Court, and placing the regime’s senior officials responsible for these crimes before justice;
    • Imposing previous UNSC resolutions covering Iran’s nuclear weapons program, banning uranium enrichment, and launching unconditional inspections into the regime’s military and non-
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:46 am on 16 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IRGC,   

    Iran Regime’s Cyber Threat Will Only Get Worse 

    cyber-warfare-iran-hacks-united-states

    NCRI Staff

    The cyber threat from the Iranian Regime will only continue to grow and get more advanced, according to a leading political scientist.

    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh, an expert on Iran, wrote a piece for Arab News in which he explained how the cyber operations were not conducted by individuals but were a “key element” of the Regime’s foreign policy, national security and long-term strategic agenda.

    This has been denied by the Regime but Rafizadeh cited Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei’s speech to students at universities funded by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

    Khamenei was quoted in state-run media outlets as saying: “You are the cyberwar agents and such a war requires Amman-like insight and Malik Ashtar-like resistance. Get yourself ready for such war wholeheartedly.”

    The IRGC exploited tech-savvy Iranian youth by investing in their education and then recruiting them for malign and hostile operations targeting nations like the US, Saudi Arabia, Britain and Israel.

    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh  wrote: “The Iranian regime has been relentless in finding various methods to subvert these nations through attacks on governmental institutions, the private sector and underlying infrastructures.”

    Here are just some of the Regime’s recent attacks:

    • Destructive cyberattacks against Saudi Arabia by Iranian hacking group Cadelle and Chafer

    • Malicious Iranian software “Shamoon” attacks 15 Saudi governmental and non-governmental networks

    • Iranian Regime launches cyber attack against Saudi oil producer Aramco, disabling 30,000 of its computers (roughly 75%) which took several months and a large amount of money to fix

    • Attacks on US and South Korean aviation and energy companies by an Iranian hacking group

    • Attacks on the email accounts of dozens of British MPs, including Prime Minister Theresa May.

    The Regime cyber attacks do not just target foreign governments- as many government-instructed hackers from around the world do- they target all enemies of the Regime, like human rights activists and media companies.

    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh wrote: “The Iranian regime has also ratcheted up cyberspying efforts against Iranians living abroad, particularly those who are influential in informing foreign policy and criticizing the regime.”

    Why is Iran investing in hacking?

    Simply, it fits in with the Regime’s offensive line: attacking others while minimising retaliation.

    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh wrote: “Before the age of the internet, Tehran relied heavily on proxies, mercenaries and militias. Using indirect methods gives the ruling mullahs an advantage, and lowers the risk and cost. It helps the Iranian leaders dodge responsibility and accountability and provides them with the powerful tool of deniability on the international stage. Iran has never been held accountable when its puppets were caught attacking another nation, smuggling weapons, or violating international laws.”

    This lack of accountability also helps Iran to avoid a potential war with the superpowers, which their military could not handle.

    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh wrote: “It is worth noting that many of Iran’s cyber attacks are aimed at the petrochemical industry, military and intelligence sectors in order to gain leverage, particularly over Saudi Arabia and the US. In addition, since the regime cannot obtain advanced weapons from the US, cyber spying helps the regime gain access to the technical data required to advance its military aviation capabilities.

    The hackers normally steal data and then introduce malware to the system to delete all the data afterwards.”

    With these benefits, the Iranian Regime is unlikely to stop its’ cyber warfare anytime soon, which will pose a serious threat to enemies of the Regime.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:04 am on 13 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IRGC, , ,   

    After Fighting Common Enemy ISIS, How Will Rising Tensions Between U.S. and Iran Affect Iraq? 

    1

    How U.S. and Iran found a common enemy in ISIS

    After fighting ISIS, how will rising tensions between U.S. and Iran affect Iraq?
    Video – For watching the video click on the below link:

    https://player.pbs.org/viralplayer/3007409295/

    TRANSCRIPT :

    Judy Woodruff: Now the final installment in our series Iran Rising in Iraq that examines Tehran’s influence there, and what it means for U.S. policy in the region. Washington is worried about that sway and presence in Iraq, and is taking measures to counter it, raising U.S.-Iran tensions. But, tonight, we look at an extraordinary moment when the U.S. and Iran made common cause to fight a common enemy, and why many say that is unlikely to happen again. In partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, here again is special correspondent Reza Sayah.

    Reza Sayah: October 2016, a coalition of military forces in Iraq launched an offensive to take back the city of Mosul from ISIS. And fighting on the same side were the United States and the Islamic Republic of Iran. Iraqi Army General Ghais Al-Hamdawi says it was a superbly coordinated mission.

    Maj. Gen. Ghais Al-hamdawi (through Interpreter): It was the perfect example of bravery and cooperation among everybody, the PMF, tanks, army, air force, the American Air Force, special ops, and even citizens took part. This battle should be a lesson for all the armies in the world.

    Reza Sayah: The mission was called We Are Coming. Among the forces helping the Iraqi army, 500 American troops on the ground and U.S. fighter jets providing air support, and 16,000 fighters from the Popular Mobilization Forces, PMF for short, a volunteer Iraqi militia largely armed and funded by Iran and advised by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. For the next several months, the Iranian-backed militia helped overpower ISIS on the ground in towns and villages surrounding Mosul. Once ISIS was encircled and trapped, in came Iraqi forces, backed by U.S. artillery units and airpower, to finish the extremist group.

    Mazin Al-eshaiker: What unites both Iran and the United States is their goal to end ISIS, which we, as Iraqis, obviously appreciated.

    Reza Sayah: Iraqi politician Mazin Al-Eshaiker says Washington and Tehran never publicly acknowledged the strategy and never made direct contact to discuss it.

    Mazin Al-eshaiker: I’m talking the U.S. and Iranian didn’t sit face to face, but the Iraqis sat face to face with the Iranians, and, in the same token, sat face to face with the Americans to come up with a joint plan for both sides.

    Reza Sayah: The plan worked. In July, ISIS was defeated in its last major stronghold, thanks in part to a rare occasion where the United States and Iran tacitly cooperated to beat a common enemy. But Iraqi officials say, don’t expect U.S.-Iran cooperation again in Iraq any time soon.

    Mazin Al-eshaikerWe are free to dream what we want, but it will not happen.

    Reza Sayah: Under President Barack Obama, the U.S. policy with Iran was cautious engagement on some issues. With the election of President Donald Trump, the policy immediately changed to confrontation, escalating the nearly four-decade-long cold war between the countries. In October, President Donald Trump repeated accusations that Iran sponsors terrorism in the region, and slapped sanctions against Iran’s Revolutionary Guard.

    President Donald Trump: The Iranian dictatorship’s aggression continues to this day. The regime remains the world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism.

    Reza Sayah: Mr. Trump also refused to certify that Iran was complying with the 2015 nuclear deal, even though the remaining world powers and U.N. inspectors said Iran was complying. Ten days later, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson visited Riyadh to boost Iraq’s ties with Iran’s main regional rival in the region, Saudi Arabia. Tillerson also suggested the PMF was an Iranian fighting force and called for the militia to disband, a demand the Iraqi government rejected, insisting PMF fighters were Iraqi nationals.

    Rex Tillerson: Certainly, Iranian militias that are in Iraq, now that the fight against Da’esh and ISIS is coming to a close, those militias need to go home.

    Reza Sayah: And, last week, CIA Director Mike Pompeo revealed that he had sent a letter to Qasem Soleimani, a senior commander in Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, warning Iran over its behavior in Iraq.

    Mike Pompeo: He refused to open the letter. It didn’t break my heart, to be honest with you. What we were communicating to him in that letter was that we will hold he and Iran accountable for any attacks on American interests in Iraq by forces that are under their control. And we wanted to make sure he and the leadership in Iran understood that in a way that was crystal clear.

    Reza Sayah: Senior Iranian officials have hit back in the war of words. Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif called U.S. policy in the Middle East dangerous. In a live televised address, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani accused Western countries, including the United States, of having fed and armed ISIS. And in a speech to university students last month, Iran’s supreme leader called the U.S. Iran’s number one enemy.

    Ayatollah Ali Khamenei (through Interpreter): My dear children, don’t forget that in this very important path where you’re following your goals, your number one enemy is America.

    Seyed Hosseini: America has to learn a lesson.

    Reza Sayah: Iran-based pro-Iranian political analyst Seyed Hosseini says better relations between Washington and Tehran is good for Iraq. But that won’t happen, he says, unless the U.S. changes what Hosseini calls a hostile policy against Iran.

    Seyed Hosseini: Until they don’t correct themselves and their policies in the region, I don’t think there will be a great hope for that. America, for them to be present in the region, they need Iranian help. They must just come to terms and accept the presence of a powerful Iran.

    Reza Sayah: Many Iraqis doubt Tehran and Washington will change their policies. Ali Elami has owned this Baghdad supermarket for five decades. This is where Iraq’s former dictator Saddam Hussein used to stop by for late-night shawarmas, he says. So, Saddam Hussein had shawarma at your place? Elami says the U.S. and Iran are both here for their own interests, not to help Iraq.

    Ali Elami (through Interpreter): The location of Iraq is very strategic. There’s oil, rivers. When Americans came and kicked out Saddam, they didn’t do it for our interests. They did it for oil and money. Iran has expanded here not for our sake. They did it for their own benefit.

    Muthanna Amin Nader: We pay a price as a people in Iraq.

    Reza Sayah: Iraqi politician Muthana Amin Nader is happy to see is defeated in Iraq. But what he fears now is a dangerous proxy war between Iran and the U.S.

    Muthanna Amin Nader: Conflict between Iran and America makes our people as victim. We give a very, very expensive price. It’s time to say enough for bleeding in Iraq and destroying Iraq. They should support us, but also keep away from us.

    Reza Sayah: With so much at stake here for the U.S. and Iran, keeping away from Iraq seems unlikely. How the two adversaries manage that high-stakes competition while they’re here may go a long way in shaping the future of Iraq. For the PBS NewsHour, I’m Reza Sayah in Baghdad.

     

     
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