Diplomatic immunity for terrorism

The Iranian regime must not be permitted to take advantage of diplomatic immunity to pursue terrorist objectives
The Iranian regime must not be permitted to take advantage of diplomatic immunity to pursue terrorist objectives

The Iranian regime has taken measures seeking to inflict a severe blow to the Iranian opposition through terrorist attacks. To this end, Tehran dispatched a sleeping cell, consisting of an Iranian-Belgian couple, to receive 500 grams of the dangerous TATP explosives from their Vienna-based diplomat by the name of Asadollah Assadi.

The couple were then instructed to go to Paris from Belgium and target an Iranian opposition rally on June 30th held in Villepinte, a town near Paris.

Tens of thousands of people and hundreds of prominent dignitaries from across the globe were attending the event, and the casualty figures of this attack could have been enormous.

By taking advantage of diplomatic immunity, the Iranian regime has a long history of carrying out espionage measures and terrorist attacks abroad. The Iranian opposition coalition National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) has a long history of exposing these measures.

For the past three decades the NCRI, with the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI) at its core, has emphasized domestic crackdown and exporting terrorism/warmongering are the two pillars guaranteeing this regime’s ongoing existence. All key officials are involved in these two initiatives.

The decision to carry out this operation targeting the Iranian opposition was made by the most senior regime officials.

Three months later, the French government’s recent decision to conduct a raid on October 2nd targeting a religious center tied to the Iranian regime, accusing the individuals in charge of terrorism. This was a firm measure by the French authorities, aiming to prevent terrorist attacks in the future. Over 200 police officers from various units took part in this raid.

The al-Zahra Center in northern France was involved in directing and providing logistics for a number of Shiite associations linked to the Iranian regime. French authorities believe these entities have links to terrorist groups such as Hamas and the Lebanese Hezbollah.

French Foreign, Interior, and Finance ministers issued a joint statement emphasizing the plot targeting the Iranian opposition rally on June 30th was foiled and a number of other such events on our soil cannot go unanswered.

The Iranian regime’s embassies across the globe, and especially in Europe, are literally centers of terrorism and espionage. As a result, to prevent the Iranian regime’s terrorism, the Iranian opposition has called upon European countries to implement the European Union’s 29 April 1997 statement regarding the Iranian regime’s intelligence operatives.

From this day forward, the Iranian regime must not be permitted to take advantage of diplomatic immunity to pursue its malign and terrorist objectives.

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Humans Without Rights

The World Day Rural Women-Oct. 2018

I read a report on the situation of rural women in Iran, which was prepared by the Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran. The report is published on the occasion of the International Rural Women’s Day. In this comprehensive report, which I put the PDF link at the end of the article for full study, the main violations of the rural women’ rights in Iran has been investigated. I draw your attention to the summary of this comprehensive report.

A Study of the Situation of Rural Women in Iran From the Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran.

In Iran, the word “village” brings to mind a place without water and electricity, with sheds made of mud and adobe. So, shortages and deficiencies are inherent to the word village.

The burden of such intolerable life, of course, is carried by women and girls who have to respond to the needs of their families despite the fact that their own special needs are never responded to.

The life of Iran’s rural women does not comply with any humane, let alone, international standards. Rural women in Iran are “forgotten” human beings who are deprived of the most basic requirements of a decent life.

The general director of Women and Family Affairs in the Central Province’s Governorate, Zahra Faraji, described the situation of rural women as “disorganized.” She acknowledged that although rural women do not enjoy any resources or opportunities, “The issue of occupation of rural women and girls has not been defined in any of the government plans and programs.”

Albeit tragic, the statement does not reflect the whole truth.

On the one hand, there is no transparency on the situation of rural women in Iran.

On the other hand, the situation of Iranian women in general is deplorable since their rights have not been respected in the law and are discriminated against because of their gender.

According to Article 1210 of the Constitution, a girl is mature when she is 9 lunar years.

Article 1041 sanctions marriage of girl children at the age of 13 and even younger with the consent of their father.

Article 1105 of the Constitution reiterates that man is the head of the household.  Article 1117 states that man can prevent his wife from being employed in any profession or industry if doing so contradicts the family’s interests.

According to articles 1123 and 1124 of the Constitution, a man can divorce his wife if she gets sick. Whereas woman faces numerous obstacles in filing for divorce.

The few above mentioned examples violate Iranian woman’s basic rights. Naturally, the situation is much worse in the case of women who live in rural areas as they also have to grapple with absolute poverty and destitution.

The information in this report has been compiled from a limited number of reports which appeared in the state media.

Noteworthy is that most of the problems mentioned for one or two villages are common to all villages and the differences are not significant.

1-lack of Access to infrastructures

LACK OF ACCESS TO INFRASTRUCTURES

2-Food security and nutrition

FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION

3-Access to medical care

ACCESS TO MEDICAL CARE

4-Access to education

ACCESS OF EDUCATION

5-Marriage of girl children and sale of girls

MARRIAGE OF GIRL CHILDREN AND SALE OF GIRLS

6-Gender-based violence

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE

7-Employment and wages

EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES

8-Shanty dwelling

SHANTY DWELLING

9-Social activities and status

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES AND STATUS

10-Participation in political decision making

PARTICIPATION IN POLITICAL DECISION MAKING

11-Access to the internet technology

ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TECHNOLOGY

12-Some telling examples

Photos of rural women who carry the burden of life in underprivileged villages are more telling than anything else.

SOME TELLING EXAMPLES

 Download English Version

Humans without rights

Cruel And Inhuman; Executions In Iran. Annual report on the death penalty in Iran, October 2018

Iran-executions

Introduction

While 160 countries across the world have either abolished the Death Penalty or at least called a moratorium on its use, the clerical regime ruling Iran remains among the world’s most brutal.

The Iranian regime executes more people per capita than any other country. The total number of executions carried out in Iran stands only next to China, whose population is over 17 folds greater. According to Amnesty International, Iran accounts for over half of executions world over.

Tehran sanctions capital punishment for political dissidents as well as ethnic and religious minorities. Juvenile offenders and women are not excluded.

Iran Human Rights Monitor recorded at least 3,602 death sentences carried out during Rouhani’s tenure. This includes the executions of 34 juvenile offenders, 84 women and 86 political prisoners.

Since January 2018, at least 223 people have been executed. The executions of at least nine political prisoners and six individuals who were under 18 at the time of the crime have been confirmed. 35 executions were carried out in public. The actual numbers are likely to be much higher as most executions are carried out secretly.

The death penalty is not only a means for punishment in Iran, but a tool for perserving the rule of those in power in the face of an increasingly furious populace.

The most recent case was the Judiciary spokesman threatening to execute truckers participating in a nationwide strike to demand their rights.

In yet another case, the head of the Revolutionary Court warned that those arrested in the January 2018 protests could face the death penalty.

On the occasion of the World Day Against the Death Penalty, Iran Human Rights Monitor draws attention in this report to the common use of the death penalty in Iran often carried out before completion of the due process of law against young Iranians.

Iran HRM calls on all international human rights advocates, in particular the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran, and the Working Group on Arbitrary Executions, to use their powers and authority to compel the clerical regime to stop its prevalent use of the death penalty.

iran-execution-2

Executing Child Offenders

Iran is one of only four countries known to have executed child offenders since 2013.

At least 85 individuals arrested as minors, are known to be on death row. They include, Mohammad Kalhori, Hamid Ahmadi, Abolfazl Naderi, Babak Pouladi, Mohammad Khazaian, Pouria Tabaie, Mohammad Salehi, Mehdi Bohlouli, Mohammad Reza Haddadi and Saleh Shariati.

In contrast to the international law, retrials of juvenile offenders pursuant to Article 91 of the 2013 Islamic Penal Code result in renewed death sentences following arbitrary assessments of their “maturity” at the time of the crime.

Article 6.5 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights states that death sentence “shall not be imposed for crimes committed by persons below eighteen years of age.”

Iranian authorities detain death-row child offenders until they pass their 18th birthday and then they execute them.

Iran has executed at least five child offenders across the country since January 2018:

Amirhossein Pourjafar

On January 4, authorities in Karaj prison executed Amirhossein Pourjafar for the rape and murder of a 3-year-old girl when he was 16. Pourjafar, who was 18 when he was executed, told Shargh newspaper on December 30, 2017, that he was under influence of alcohol when he committed the crime. Mojtaba Farahbakhsh, Pourjafar’s lawyer, told the newspaper that Pourjafar had signs of a “conduct disorder” and had been hospitalized in a mental health center during his detention. Despite these circumstances, the authorities pushed ahead with carrying out the death penalty.

Ali Kazemi

On January 30, authorities in Bushehr prison, in southern Iran, executed Ali Kazemi for a murder he allegedly committed when he was 15. He was executed even though the authorities had promised to try to halt the execution. On the morning of January 30, prison authorities called to reassure the family that the execution had not taken place. However, at midday, Kazemi’s family found out that the execution had just been carried out.

Mahboubeh Mofidi

On January 30, in Nowshahr prison in northern Iran, authorities executed Mahboubeh Mofidi, who was married when she was 13, for the alleged murder of her husband in 2014, when she was 17. Mofidi was 20 when authorities executed her on January 30 in Nowshahr prison in Mazandaran province.

Abolfazl Chezani Sharahi

On June 27, Abolfazl Chezani Sharahi, aged 19, was executed in Qom prison in Qom province, central Iran.  He was sentenced to death for a murder committed when he was aged 14 based on an official medical opinion that he was “mature” at the time of the crime.

Zeinab Sekaanvand

On October 2, 24-year-old Kurdish woman Zeinab Sekaanvand was executed in Urumieh central prison, in Iran’s West Azerbaijan province, despite being only 17 at time of alleged crime. Sekaanvand was married at 15, suffered domestic abuse and reportedly endured torture during her police interrogation.

Executing political prisoners

10 political prisoners have been executed since January 2018, most of which despite international campaigns urging reprieve.

Ramin Hossein Panahi, Zaniar Moradi and Loghman Moradi

Ramin Hossein Panahi and cousins Zaniar Moradi and Loghman Moradi were executed on Saturday, September 8.

The trials of all three men were grossly unfair. All were denied access to their lawyers and families after their arrest, and all said they were tortured into making “confessions”. They had been sentenced to death despite these massive failings in due process.

The two cousins had spent eight years on death row since confessing to a 2009 killing of the son of a Muslim cleric in Marivan, a confession that both men later said was extracted under torture.

Panahi was sentenced to death in January for allegedly drawing a weapon against Iranian security forces operating in northwestern Iran’s predominantly ethnic Kurdish region in June 2017. He confessed to taking up arms against the state, but Amnesty said family members who saw him in court believe he also was tortured into confessing because of apparent torture marks on his body.

Ramin Hossein Panahi began a hunger strike at Rajaei Shahr prison on August 26 by sewing his lips together in protest at his death sentence.

Mohammad Salas

On June 18, Iranian authorities executed Mohammad Salas convicted of killing three police officers during clashes involving members of a Sufi order, despite calls to stop his execution.

According to Amnesty International, the 51-year-old bus driver was convicted and sentenced to death in March following  a “grossly unfair trial.”

Salas said he was forced under torture to make a “confession” against himself. This “confession”, taken from his hospital bed, was broadcast on state television weeks before his trial and used as the only piece of evidence to convict him. He was not allowed access to his chosen lawyer at any point before or during his trial, and his independent lawyer’s repeated demands to the authorities to allow critical evidence indicating his innocence were dismissed outright.

Death-row prisoners, horrifying numbers

Rjaie Shahr Prison

The highest number of executions count up for Rajaishahr Prison. This prison is also known as Gohardasht. It’s located in the city of Karaj approximately 20 km west of Tehran.

Around 264 inmates are held in ward 10 of this prison, of which 86 are on death row, meaning one third.

In ward 3, known as the youth ward, with around 180 inmates under the age of 25, around 80 are currently on death row condemned for “retribution in kind.” A number of these individuals were arrested under the age of 18. This accumulates to nearly half of the youth ward and one-third of ward 10 are inmates on death row.

In ward 3 nearly 120 of the 210 inmates are on death row. This is more than half.

In ward 2, known as the Dar Al Quran ward, 120 of the 160 inmates are condemned based on “retribution” charges.

Qezel Hessar Prison

Unit 2 of this prison has around 1,000 death row inmates, with numerous individuals charged with murder and others for drug offenses.

Urmia Central Prison

Inwards 1 to 4 of this jail more than 166 individuals are currently on death row. All the while this may not be the latest numbers.

Wards 1 and 2 of this prison, specified for mentally disturbed inmates, eight individuals are on death row. Ward 12 is also home to three death row inmates.

The so-called youth ward houses six individuals condemned to execution.

Ward 15, known as the drug offenses ward, six individuals are known to be on death row.

Zahedan Central Prison

According to the latest list of names rounded up in March, 145 inmates are on death row. Some of which have been held in the horrendous conditions of this jail for years awaiting their execution. Drug criminals and a number of political prisoners are seen among the death row inmates.

24 individuals in ward 4 of this prison are on death row, mostly for drug-related charges, murders or affiliation to political groups.

Wards 1 and 3 of this prison houses another 21 death row inmates.

Dastgerd Prison of Isfahan

This prison has around 20 death row inmates, charged with murder and drug offenses.

Death-row prisoners’ conditions

 The 17th World Day Against the Death Penalty aims at raising awareness on the inhumane living conditions of people sentenced to death.

Death row prisoners in Iran linger in catastrophic conditions from solitary confinement to the medieval tortures inflicted on them. The living conditions tend to dehumanize death-row prisoners and take away their dignity.

In many cases where people were sentenced to death or executed, the proceedings did not meet international standards of the due process of law. This includes the extraction of “confessions” through torture or other ill-treatment.

The tortures some death row prisoners were reportedly subjected to follow:

  1. Completely stripping the prisoners and pouring boiling hot water on them;
  2. Pushing needles into their genitals;
  3. Hanging prisoners upside down from their feet;
  4. Hanging prisoners by their wrists;
  5. Pulling out the prisoners’ nails;
  6. Leaving the prisoners in absolute darkness for about forty days. Some prisoners lose part of their eyesight;
  7. Depriving prisoners of bathing for two months;
  8. Restricting prisoners’ use of restroom to only once in every 24 hours;
  9. Giving prisoners food rations the size of the palm of a hand;
  10. Forcing prisoners to eat in the same unwashed plate for three months;
  11. Flogging prisoners while eating their food.

Many spend prolonged periods on death row, sometimes for more than a decade. On numerous occasions, prisoners are sent to the gallows, then returned to the cell. Sometimes, they inform prisoners of scheduled hanging but postpone its implementation. In this way, death-row prisoners have to endure additional pain and suffering.

Sometimes, the families are not informed of the execution of their loved ones adequately in advance and not given the chance to say goodbye.

A commonplace in many Iranian prisons is to force the families of execution victims to pay for the noose used to hang their loved ones, or the bullet used to shoot them. The victim’s body is not delivered to the family until the money is paid.

2018 reports included cases of authorities refusing to deliver the body of execution victims to their families or burying them without the families’ permission.

Download the names and identifications of the victims of executions in 2018:

Download PDF

High education fees threaten the future of Iran’s children

In Iran, high cost of education and stationery will deprive many students from going to school
In Iran, high cost of education and stationery will deprive many students from going to school

In Iran, high education fees and prices of stationery will deprive many students of going to school. Many students will be eliminated from the cycle of education very soon as their families cannot afford the costs.

Ali Khodaei, an Iranian regime’s official in labor affairs, admitted: “The prices of all necessary items for families have suddenly escalated, and in this situation, school fees can lead to dangerous consequences.” Khodaie told state-run news agency ILNA on September 22, “Red alerts are on, for months; it will not be unexpected many students and especially girls to drop out of school if the government does not allocate enough budget for education of labor-class families.”

This pressure on families for paying school fees appears after the denial of the Ministry of Education from providing the schools’ budget. Moreover, people are struggling with the rising price of stationery.

People are crying out for the high cost of living

In a video clip widely distributed in social media, a lady talks about the high cost of stationery: “I went to buy some stationery yesterday and it cost me 8,000,000 rials. I was shocked! School books cost me 200,000 rials! Stationery cost me 3,000,000 rials and a backpack 3,000,000 rials. This is the situation in our country.” She also added, “Some notebooks, pens and color pencils cost 3,000,000 rials, and some school books 1,200,000 rials.”

In recent times, prices have increased by 100 percent and families cannot afford the costs. Purchasing items from the market decreased by 50 percent and if a family could but 10 notebooks last year, they just can buy 5 this year.

On September 14, state-run news agency Tasnim aired a report about the unexpected cost of stationery in the northern province of Mazandaran. In this report, a buyer talks about the inability of people to buy goods: “The ability of people has decreased and the prices have increased; so families cannot provide necessities for their children.” “The price of stationery has increased by 100 percent, however, it cannot be found in the market” the buyer added. “There is no foreign-made stationery at all, and the domestic goods are of low quality. However domestic goods are resuming an ascending trend. We were selling a pencil for 5,000 rials, but now we have to buy it for 7,000!” a shopkeeper complains.

People in Gilan province, northern Iran, are crying out for the same reason. Highlighting the increasing prices compared to the last year, a buyer described the situation as saying: “There is a blatant difference between the prices year on year. We could buy the same items at half the price. They (governmental officials) told us that we can find proper prices in the state-run market, but the prices there were also doubled.”

Rising education fees have forced some families to send just one of their children to the school as they cannot afford the cost of education for all of their family.

Moving figures of dropouts from education

The regime’s corrupt policies and rising prices are forcing students to drop out or school at an accelerating pace.

Jahan-e San’at state-run newspaper issued shocking figures on September 23, 2018: “The number of children deprived of education is approximately 7 million in Iran.” The report added, “Out of every 3 Iranian youth aged 6-18, one has either quit education or has not enrolled at all.”

This is while many children in far-off regions have no access to any schools, in addition to above mentioned problems.

This is how the poor Iranian children who are deprived of their right to education, end up into street peddling, child labor or become street children with no right to livelihoods and dignity, and drowned in social crisis.

Poverty and child labor Poverty and child labor

Under the Iranian regime, the rights of children can’t be compared with what the Convention on the Rights of the Child states

What Iranian children are enjoying is in total contrast to what they’re entitled to according to the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Article 28

1. States Parties recognize the right of the child to education, and with a view to achieving this right progressively and on the basis of equal opportunity, they shall, in particular:

(a) Make primary education compulsory and available free to all;

(b) Encourage the development of different forms of secondary education, including general and vocational education, make them available and accessible to every child, and take appropriate measures such as the introduction of free education and offering financial assistance in case of need;

(c) Make higher education accessible to all on the basis of capacity by every appropriate means;

(d) Make educational and vocational information and guidance available and accessible to all children;

(e) Take measures to encourage regular attendance at schools and the reduction of drop-out rates.

2. States Parties shall take all appropriate measures to ensure that school discipline is administered in a manner consistent with the child’s human dignity and in conformity with the present Convention.

3. States Parties shall promote and encourage international cooperation in matters relating to education, in particular with a view to contributing to the elimination of ignorance and illiteracy throughout the world and facilitating access to scientific and technical knowledge and modern teaching methods. In this regard, particular account shall be taken of the needs of developing countries.

Article 29

1. States Parties agree that the education of the child shall be directed to:

(a) The development of the child’s personality, talents and mental and physical abilities to their fullest potential;

(b) The development of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and for the principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations;

(c) The development of respect for the child’s parents, his or her own cultural identity, language, and values, for the national values of the country in which the child is living, the country from which he or she may originate, and for civilizations different from his or her own;

(d) The preparation of the child for responsible life in a free society, in the spirit of understanding, peace, tolerance, equality of sexes, and friendship among all peoples, ethnic, national and religious groups and persons of indigenous origin;

(e) The development of respect for the natural environment.

2. No part of the present article or article 28 shall be construed so as to interfere with the liberty of individuals and bodies to establish and direct educational institutions, subject always to the observance of the principle set forth in paragraph 1 of the present article and to the requirements that the education given in such institutions shall conform to such minimum standards as may be laid down by the State.

It goes without saying that the condition of 7 million children mentioned in Jahan-e San’at, is the exact opposite of what the two articles mention.

It is worth mentioning that, according to the 30th principle of the Iranian regime’s own constitution, education in Iran must be free for all below the university level.

However, the fact is that the regime has left no right for the Iranian people including children. The regime is neither committed to its own constitution nor to international conventions.

All these happen while Tehran allocates billions of dollars to its proxies in Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Africa to export terrorism and fundamentalism. Meanwhile, Iran’s future generations lack schools, education, and their most basic needs.

 

 

Iran: Figures acknowledging the regime’s utter failure

Iran_s protests continue to boil

Acknowledging the complete failure of the mullahs’ ideology in Iran is nothing new. The fact that the Iranian regime’s state media are discussing this subject and the current crises due to the regime’s corrupt apparatus is what is quite new indeed.

New remarks are heard questioning even Iranian regime Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei himself, and directly or indirectly consider him the main individual responsible for the current crises and status quo, signals a growing sign of unrest and dissent inside the country.

Abolfazl Ghadiani and Alireza Rajaie, two figures known for their close relations with the Iranian regime apparatus, issued a statement published in a variety of media outlets discussing this subject.

“The Islamic republic is now engulfed in a flood of crises and it is the target of numerous daily attacks from different sources. Pretending to be calm and having self-confidence will not resolve any of the countless dilemmas, including apprehensions, detentions, and executions,” the statement reads.

“The newly found power oligarchy seen after the 1979 revolution established entity after entity to maybe be able to overcome the increasing crises. The [regime] has filed time and again. It was inside this oligarch that various circles of power and wealth came to life due to their access to government money. These entities consider the government and the country as their own economic playground, and are specifically in contrast with democratic demands, religious and ethnic minorities, and freedom of the press.”

Questioning the complete apparatus of the religious fascism ruling Iran currently is not a subject limited to these two individuals.

In response to this expanding wave of challenging the mullahs’ religious dictatorship, figures close to Iranian regime Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei are heard raising their voices.

“Necessary measures must be taken in the face of seditions. Why must [Khamenei’s] words be heard and no action be taken?” said Mullahs Sedighi, the temporary Friday prayer imam in Tehran.

It is quite interesting that the figures now challenging Khamenei’s methods were once among the utmost loyalists to the mullahs’ rule.

The truth is that protests are spreading in Iran and the organized resistance movement is gaining force, making a growing number of figures inside the Iranian regime extremely concerned about their own future.

Furthermore, Khamenei lacks the power, influence, and capability to take actions against such voices. This weakness is realized by all of Iran’s society and a growing number of people no longer fear the crackdown imposed by the regime’s security apparatus.

This is allowing the Iranian opposition People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) to increase the number of resistance units across the country.

Such entities are escalating their measures against the regime and reigniting hope and courage in the hearts of a restive Iranian population that will no longer tolerate the religious dictatorship’s crackdown.

US Releases Report on Iran Regime’s Destructive Behavior

US Releases Report on Iran Regime’s Destructive Behaviour

The US State Department has released an extensive report detailing the Iranian Regime’s “destructive behavior” at home and abroad shortly before the 40th anniversary of the mullahs stealing power.

The report, entitled Outlaw Regime: A Chronicle of Iran’s Destructive Activities, goes into stark detail about Iran’s support for terrorism, illicit financial activities, abuse of human rights, environmental exploitation, its missile program, a threat to cyber security, and a threat to maritime security.

The report starts with a letter from US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who explains why the US withdrew from the 2015 Iranian nuclear deal and how the Iranian Regime will suffer as a result.

He wrote that the current US policy on Iran reflected that Iran is “not a normal state”, arguing that normal states don’t:

• attack embassies and military installations in peacetime

• hold hostage citizens of foreign nations

• jail their own citizens or those of other countries on specious crimes

• impose severe restrictions on basic freedoms

• conduct covert assassinations in other countries

• engage in torture

• squander their own natural resources

• proliferate missile technology to dangerous proxies

• violently suppress legitimate protests

• serve as a sanctuary for terrorists

• call for the destruction of Israel and threaten other countries

• aid brutal dictators such as Syria’s Bashar al-Assad

• fuel terrorist proxies and militias

Pompeo said that the report served as “a full record of the Islamic Republic’s hostile behavior abroad and its repression at home beyond the continued threat of its nuclear program”.

The report

The report makes clear that the Iranian Regime’s support for terrorism has gone on since the start of the Regime, usually driven by the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) and its Qods Force as well as the Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The report read: “Today, the IRGC-QF is active across the Middle East and has plotted or carried out terrorist attacks in five out of seven continents. Where it is unable or unwilling to act directly, the Iranian regime has mastered the use of terrorist proxy groups like Lebanese Hizballah, Palestine Islamic Jihad, the Bahraini Al- Ashtar Brigades and the Iraqi Kata’ib Hizballah to conduct terrorist attacks.”

This support for terrorist groups has been aided by Iran’s continued development of ballistic missiles – in violation of UN resolution 2231 – and its “opaque and fraudulent financing activities”, which have undermined the integrity and security of the global financial system.

As a result of all of this, the US considers Iran a threat to maritime security in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea and to cyber security, where they have been engaging in unsafe behaviours for a couple of years, mainly through the use of proxies.

The Iranian Regime is also known to have ignored environmental crises that have led to drought and mass migration in Iran; something not surprising considering their “repeated and systemic abuse of human rights”. The report observes that the Regime’s human rights abuses extend far beyond its borders, with the murder of civilians in Syria and the arbitrary detention of Sunnis in Iraq.

Pompeo wrote: “Iran is a society with so much greater potential. We want to reach a new agreement with Iran that ensures its nuclear activities are peaceful and that its role in the Middle East is constructive. We seek a deal that ensures Iran does not support terrorism around the world and provides for the greater opportunity to its own people. We are prepared to work with the Iranian regime, but only if it makes major changes. Until then, the Iranian regime can rest assured of our firm resolve to counter their destabilizing activities. Given the record we have published today, they should expect nothing less.”

UN Security Council discusses Iranian regime bellicosity

President Trump Chairs UN Security Council Meeting

President Trump Chairs UN Security Council Meeting

New York, Sept. 26, 2018 – The Iranian regime came under criticism at the United Nations Security Council on Wednesday, a session specifically chaired by U.S. President Donald Trump focusing on the threats posed by Tehran’s mullahs and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

President Trump Chairs UNSC Meeting

President Trump Chairs UNSC Meeting

Describing the mullahs’ regime as the world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism, U.S. President Donald Trump blasted the Iranian regime’s support for the Assad regime in butchering the Syrian people. Iran’s mullah should never be permitted to obtain nuclear weapons, he highlighted.

Voicing his position to the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, Trump emphasized how the Iranian regime used money from the highly flawed deal for terrorism and creating havoc. The U.S. imposed sanctions to confront the Iranian regime’s malign activities, he continued.

Washington calls on all UN members to cooperate with us in guaranteeing Iran never obtains nuclear weapons, Trump finalized.

French President Macron Speaks at the UNSC in NY

French President Macron Speaks at the UNSC in NY

French President Emmanuel Macron highlighted the Iranian regime’s regional threat, with a special focus on the need to analyze and prevent the Iranian regime’s ballistic missiles program.

The transfer of missiles to the Lebanese Hezbollah and Houthis in Yemen, both militia groups supported directly by the Iranian regime, were other issues members of the UN Security Council voiced concerns about and sought immediate action.

Iranians rally in NY to oppose the presence of Rouhani at the UNGA

Iranians rally in NY to oppose the presence of Rouhani at the UNGA

Members of the Iranian Diaspora from across the world rallied in front of the UN headquarters in New York for the second consecutive day, protesting the presence of Hassan Rouhani, the president of the Iranian regime, and to echo the demands of thousands of protesters in Iran calling for regime change in their country. Yesterday, the protesters held a similar protest while Rouhani spoke at the 73rd UN General Assembly summit while having to overcome unfavorable weather conditions.

Iranian diaspora rallied outside UN calling for the ouster of Rouhani from the world body

Iranian diaspora rallied outside UN calling for the ouster of Rouhani from the world body

Politicians, religious leaders, members of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) and representatives of the Syrian opposition delivered speeches at the Tuesday rally.

Iranian protesters in NY rally to say NO to Rouhani

Iranian protesters in NY rally to say NO to Rouhani

The protesters used different methods to put on display the numerous crimes and illegal activities of the Iranian regime. Most concerning in the agenda of Rouhani, who has been received as a state leader at the UN and is being framed as a “moderate” figure by many western politician, is the worrying escalation of executions during his presidency. More than 3,500 people have been executed during six years of Rouhani’s presidency, according to figures published by the Iranian opposition and confirmed by many international human rights organizations.