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  • Masoud Dalvand 3:03 pm on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran women's rights,   

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence. 

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence.
    The Coroner’s Office of Tehran, capital of Iran, declared that it has registered the names of 12,159 women as victims of violence in four months.
    The public relations of the General Department of the Coroner’s Office of Tehran Province announced that in the four months since the beginning of the Persian New Year (March 21, 2017) until July 21, 2017, it has registered the names of 33,362 people, 12,159 of them women, who had referred to the forensic centers of Tehran province due to injuries they suffered in physical fights. (The state-run Mehr news agency – September 23, 2017)

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/iran-women-news/4327-iran-over-12-000-women-registered-as-victims-of-violence

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  • Masoud Dalvand 8:19 pm on September 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran women's rights   

    Iran: Forced marriage of small girls is on the rise 

    Forced marriage of young girls is on the rise in East Azerbaijan Province, northwestern Iran. This was announced by the deputy for cultural and youth affairs in the Department of Sports and Youths of East Azerbaijan.  Amir Taghizadeh said girl children between 10 and 15 years of age are forced into marriage.

    “About 4,000 girls between 10 and 15 years of age got married in 2015. The figure reached 4,164 in 2016,” he noted.Taghizadeh also revealed that these girls are forced to marry men between 29 and 35 years of age. “East Azerbaijan is second to Khorassan Razavi province in marriage of girl children aging between 10 and 15.” He pointed out that divorce rate is high in child marriages. (The state run Kayhan newspaper – September 5, 2017 )

    Forcible_marriage_EN

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:03 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran women's rights,   

    Iran regime continues to bar Iranian women from going to sport stadiums 

    women-behind-the-stadum

    TEHRAN (AFP), 04 September 2017  – For a brief moment, Iran’s female football fans thought they were finally allowed to attend a match, but their hopes were dashed on Monday when authorities said their tickets were sold by mistake.

    Women have been barred from attending football matches, and some other sporting events such as wrestling, since the 1979 Islamic revolution, with officials saying they must be protected from the vulgar atmosphere.

    But when seats for Tuesday’s qualifying match against Syria at Tehran’s Azadi stadium went on sale on Saturday, many were shocked to see an option for women’s tickets on the website.

    Some shared their surprise and joy on Twitter with a Farsi hashtag meaning ‘I_have_ticket’.

    ‘I was extremely excited… it was unbelievable,’ football fan Arefeh Elyasi told the Shahrvand newspaper on Monday.

    Another woman, Zahra Jafarzadeh, said she bought a ticket even though she does not really like football.

     

    what is the official explanation for the ban? There isn’t any.

         What is the official explanation for the ban? There isn’t any

    ‘I felt that if didn’t sign up, I would be missing a major event,’ she told the newspaper.

    Having never been inside the stadium, some worried about which seat to choose.

    ‘My friend’s mother told me to get a seat where the ball wouldn’t hit my head,’ said Negin Bagheri.

    But it did not take long for reality to reimpose itself, as Iran’s football federation said it was all a mistake.

    ‘There is no plan to allow the presence of women in Azadi stadium for the Iran-Syria match,’ it said in a statement, blaming a ‘technical glitch’.

    Tickets held by women would all be cancelled and refunded, it said.

    ‘Maybe we all knew that we would not be allowed to enter the stadium despite buying the ticket,’ Elyasi said.

    ‘But we wanted to make our voice heard by the officials.’

    Iran was among the first teams to qualify for the 2018 world cup finals in Russia, and celebrations are planned for after the Syria game.

    Azadi Stadium

    Azadi Stadium

    Women are allowed to watch some sports, though the rules can change with little warning.

    There was shock in 2014 when women were suddenly banned from volleyball matches without explanation, although they have since been allowed to return to some events in segregated seats.

    Source: Iran regime continues to bar Iranian women from going to sport stadiums

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:28 am on August 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran women's rights, Misogynism of Mullahs,   

    Iran: Judiciary official opposes adoption of VAW bill 

    VAW

    “The bill on combating violence against women (in Iran) has been drafted from a merely sexual perspective.”

    Making this comment on August 24, 2017, legal deputy to the Judiciary, Zabihollah Khoda’ian, expressed his opposition to the adoption of the VAW bill. He justified his view by the fact that 70 out of 100 articles of the bill are “criminalizing”, “setting prison sentences for even the slightest tensions between couples.”

    If adopted, the VAW bill is going to be named “provision of security for women against violence”, and it mostly focuses on domestic violence overlooking pervasive violence committed against Iranian womenevery day at the workplace, in the streets and public places, and in prisons by the so-called law enforcement and plainclothes agents, Revolutionary Guards and Bassij, as well as government and private sector employers and employees.

    According to Hossein Ashtari, Commander of the State Security Force, an average of 2000 women are forcibly and violently arrested every day across Iran and mistreated and humiliated in detention centers for not fully observing the compulsory veil.

    At the same time, hundreds of rights activists are tortured and maltreated in Iranian prisons.

    As for domestic violence, Tehran’s forensic officials declared in January 2017, that after road accidents and street fights, the main reason for referring to the Coroner’s Office in Tehran is harassment by husbands. On the average, 52 women refer to the Coroner’s Office every day.

    This is only “less than 35 per cent” of the cases of domestic violence which are reported. According to Mohammad Ali Esfanani, spokesman of the legal and judicial committee in the parliament, in December 2014, “out of 180 complaints, 128 are not interested in following up their complaint.”

    In 2014, Rouhani’s deputy on women and family affairs Shahindokht Molaverdi revealed that 32 volumes of books containing the outcome of a national research done on domestic violence against women “have been lost” and no copies of them can be found “in the Ministry of Interior or the directorate for women and family affairs.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:11 am on August 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Farzaneh Jalali, , , Iran women's rights,   

    Iran: Repeated summoning of Farzaneh Jalali to Intelligence Department 

    Farzaneh Jalali

    Farzaneh Jalali

    Women and children’s rights activist, Farzaneh Jalali, has been repeatedly summoned to the Intelligence Department of Kermanshah, western Iran, to be interrogated.

    Ms. Jalali’s lawyer, Mostafa Ahmadian said, “The verbal summoning of his client has been illegal and the interrogations have made her upset.”

    Ahmadian asserted, “Unfortunately, my client has cooperated (so far), but I have asked her to ignore such calls until she receives written summon or emails based on legal standards.”

    “My client is under pressure from many respects and I am not legally allowed to speak about them,” Ahmadian added.

    Mostafa Ahmadian also declared that his client’s case has been declared inaccessible which is illegal and for this reason, he is not informed of the content of the case and the reasons based on which Ms. Jalali has been charged with “action against national security.”

    Farzaneh Jalali is a women’s rights activist from Kermanshah. For her activities, she was deprived of college education. On February 24, 2017, she was arrested by security forces and taken to the detention center at Naft Square of Kermanshah. On March 13, 2017, she was released from prison on a heavy bail of 300 million toumans.

    Ms. Jalali is a graduate of social anthropology from Tehran University, a former member of the students’ Islamic Association, and former editor of the university’s Sobh Daily. Despite the fact that she had passed the graduate school’s admission test with the sixth highest scores in 2010, she was deprived of continuing her education due to her student activities.

    Over the past years, she has been active with regards to women and children’s rights. She was active in gaining support for the students burned in the fire incident at a girls’ school in Shinabad Village, West Azerbaijan Province. She has also written and published a number of articles in defense of women’s rights and violations of their rights.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:29 pm on August 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran women's rights,   

    Women’s Rights in Iran Lag Far Behind Rest of the International Community 

    Within the world of the theocratic regime that rules Iran, the role of women is primarily relegated to the home. Women have limited to no access to the public and political spheres. Those who try to achieve more for themselves find that they are now putting themselves directly in opposition to the regime of the mullahs.

    One such instance is the case of Safieh Gharebaghi, a civil rights activist and female rights activist was summoned to the Zanjan Pubic and Revolutionary Court on August 6. At that point, she was charged with “spreading propaganda against the government”, “disrupting public opinion”, “publishing lies and spreading rumors”, and “supporting the sedition”. Although she is out on bail now, her case is still waiting to be tried.

    She is just one activist among hundreds that are being targeted by the regime, because the ideas they spread are contrary to the key tenets of the fundamentalism proscribed by the mullahs.

    Part of the control that the regime attempts to exert involves morality patrols and specific police meant to address how women look, act, and spend time with in a public setting.

    Recently, the Prosecutor of Qom said that a special female (Islamic Guidance) patrol team was allocated to inspect women’s public centers.

    “The Special Qom Presecutor Patrol Team, with the management of female judges, will inspect women’s centers, including studios, swimming pools, women’s gyms, and beauty salons,” said Mehdi Kaheh. “This team has so far inspected more than 45 beauty salons and 10 swimming pools and has given each place legal notices regarding their offenses with a timeframe. If they do not amend the mentioned affairs, they will be legally and judicially dealt with.”

    Keep in mind that these are not health and safety infractions, but infringe on the basic freedoms of choice that all individuals deserve. But at the same time, while resources are being put to controlling the movements of women, social challenges are impacting women negatively.

    For example, in Tehran, 700 women were found among the homeless population, which numbers over 15,000. Additionally, women who have limited opportunities for employment are being left as the sole guardians of their families. This puts them in the position of trying to take care of their families with poverty as a constant threat.

    All of these issues are impacting women and their lack of a political voice is making the social constraints even worse. What the opposition offers to the Iranian people is a gender equality and a restoration of basic human rights and freedoms. Regime change is the only way to restore the rights of women within this country, setting a model for the rest of the region.

    via Women’s Rights in Iran Lag Far Behind Rest of the International Community — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:51 am on August 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran women's rights, ,   

    Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ 

    by Siavosh Hosseini 

    The Iranian regime has increasingly focused on clamping down on anyone who speaks out against the human rights abuses of its ruling class. One of the key areas where this is demonstrated is in the trials of these individuals. Many lack basic legal representation, and the proceedings are brief. If they do have legal representation, there are often hurdles for them to meet with their lawyers and having access to court files delayed.

    Human rights lawyers who speak out against torture and unfair trials have also faced harassment, disbarment, and imprisonment. Trials of human rights defenders generally take place in a climate of fear.

    Amnesty International recently launched a global campaign ‘Brave’, calling for an end to attacks against those defending human rights worldwide.

    “It is a bitter irony that as the Iranian authorities boast about their increased engagement with the UN and the EU, particularly in the aftermath of the nuclear deal, human rights defenders who have made contact with these same institutions are being treated as criminals,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Research and Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

    “Rather than propagating the dangerous myth that human rights defenders pose a threat to national security, the Iranian authorities should focus on addressing the legitimate concerns they raise. These are people who have risked everything to build a more humane and just society – it is appalling that they are so viciously punished for their bravery.”

    Amnesty International, who released a new report entitled ‘Caught in a web of repression: Iran’s human rights defenders under attack’, is calling on the EU to speak out in the strongest terms against the persecution of human rights defenders in the country.

    “The international community, and in particular the EU, must not stay silent over the outrageous treatment of human rights defenders in Iran,” said Luther. “Instead of appeasing Iranian officials, the EU should forcefully call for the immediate and unconditional release of all those jailed for their peaceful human rights activism and for an end to the misuse of the justice system to silence activists.”

    This recent report detailed the crackdown on human rights defenders in a variety of key areas, including the death penalty, women’s rights, and trade unionists, just to name a few.

    Over the past four years, Iran’s judiciary have dropped the threshold for invoking the vague national security-related charges, while increasing the length of prison sentences for these individuals. Many of their crimes include contacting the UN and the EU, as well as international agencies focused on human rights.

    via  Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:01 pm on August 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Iran women's rights, ,   

    Iran’s women and their lost dreams 

    There are stories of Iran that mainstream media unfortunately refuse to cover. These days it is all talk about the smiling “moderate” Iranian President Hassan Rouhani launching his second term.

    One dark side of Iran the mullahs’ regime have kept a lid on is the status of Iran’s young women. Despite having a highly educated young population, with women comprising the majority of Iranians going to college, the end result, however, is mostly heartbreaking.

    Shahindokht is a young woman in her twenties working at a women’s clothes shop in Tehran’s Haft-e Teer Square. When interviewed she did not allow the reporter from Iran’s state ILNA news agency take photo of the store she works in, not even a small shot for a video-take, and nor will she allow the reporter name the store. She is afraid. Afraid of losing the job she was lucky to even find. When she talks about her conditions, one gets more familiar with the drastic circumstances young Iranian women are enduring these days:

    “I was in my last year of college, unemployed and literally broke to the point that I was going crazy. My father had been unemployed for a few years and barely making ends meet. He had been a factory worker and I don’t know how he was retired after 20 years, while earning less in comparison to others like him. My older brother drove taxis for a while, until he became a drug addict. For the past few years he sleeps until noon at home, then smokes one cigarette after another until evening. He may work a few hours, just to make his drug money. And that’s it.”
    She wants to share more of her pains, about life and her family, about a sister who has divorced, a mother who soon will most likely be diagnosed with Alzheimer… but she prefers to talk about her job, about working in the clothing store:

    “For a few days I would buy a newspaper and look through the ads. I couldn’t find a job in my field, history. As I looked more I started to become hopeless. I came to understand I either had to start selling on the streets or down in the metro, or take a job as a typist or a salesperson. Typing wasn’t easy for me. I started looking for stores selling women’s clothing, and finally, a month later, I found this place. The day when I came for the interview there were many women in line. Such a long line, you should’ve seen it.”

    Now it’s exactly eight months since Shahindokht is selling women’s clothing, and as she said, living on tips and percentage. She doesn’t have a written contract or a fixed paycheck. No insurance either…

    “We receive a monthly salary of two million or three million rials in cash from the storeowner (the equivalent of around $100), for cleaning the place, making tea, providing some service. The rest is from how much we sell. At New Year my salary reached 15 million rials (around $500), but now it’s mostly no more than seven to eight million. I am waiting for late August and September. With schools and colleges opening, young ladies and school girls come flocking in to this square to buy new clothes. That’s when we sellers see better days…”

    In the middle of her sentence two or three ladies enter the store. Shahindokht looked in despair, upset at why she had been standing outside talking. She has to go in or else the other sellers will receive the percentage, and who knows when two or three more customers will come by this store again.

    There are many such young women in Iran’s huge capital, Tehran. Women who are deprived of having a decent job, forced to work in such conditions without a guaranteed future… These women can only afford a very minimum lifestyle if their storeowners are lucky in their sales… if not, they just come and go. Meaningless labor, without any light at the end of a long, dark tunnel.

    This is the destiny awaiting young educated women in Iran ruled by the mullahs’ regime.

    via Iran’s women and their lost dreams — Iran Commentary

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:26 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Iran women's rights, ,   

    80 women executed in Iran under Rouhani 

     

    Reyhaneh

    Reyhaneh Jabbari was executed in order to defend herself against rape in October 2014

    According to the data collected from material published by the Iranian state-run press, human rights activists and their websites, or from private sources in touch with the Iranian Resistance, 80 of those executed during Rouhani’s tenure have been women.

    Nevertheless, the actual figures are definitely higher, as most executions in Iran are carried out secretly without anyone knowing except those who carry it out.

    Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran

    Women Executed Under Rouhani
    Released:July 28, 2017

    No. Name-Last Name-Age-Date of Execution-Place of Execution Officially Announced
    1 unnamed woman Sep. 10, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    2 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    3 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    4 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    5 Z S Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    6 N S Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    7 S H Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    8 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    9 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    10 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    11 Kobra Kabiri 48 Sep. 25, 2013 Gohardasht Prison –
    12 unnamed woman Sep. 26, 2013 Kerman prison Mehr News Agency
    13 Nastaran Safari 26 Oct. 21, 2013 Dizel Abad Prison — Kermanshah –
    14 Jazi Darvishzadeh Oct. 26, 2013 Orumieh Prison –
    15 Mitra Shahnavazi Oct. 30, 2013 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    16 unnamed woman Oct. 30, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    17 unnamed woman Oct. 30, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    18 A A Nov. 21, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Justice Department of Yazd
    19 R A Nov. 21, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Justice Department of Yazd
    20 unnamed woman Jan. 26, 2014 Delfan Fars News Agency
    21 Farzaneh Moradie 26 Mar. 4, 2014 Isfahan Prison ISNA news agency
    22 unnamed woman May. 10, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    23 Behjat May. 10, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    24 S T May. 28, 2014 Amol Fars News Agency
    25 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    26 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    27 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    28 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    29 unnamed woman Aug. 07, 2014 Central Prison — Kermanshah –
    30 unnamed woman Aug. 09, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    31 unnamed woman Aug. 23, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    32 unnamed woman Aug. 26, 2014 Shahab Prison — Kerman –
    33 unnamed woman Sep. 10, 2014 Gharchak Prison — Varamin –
    34 unnamed woman 60 Sep. 11, 2014 Central Prison — Rasht Iranian state television & radio
    35 unnamed woman Sep. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    36 unnamed woman Sep. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    37 Reyhaneh Jabbari 26 Oct. 25, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj IRNA news agency
    38 Akram Hosseini 43 Dec. 02, 2014 Gharchak Prison — Varamin –
    39 Marzie Ostovari Dec. 02, 2014 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    40 F GH Dec. 10, 2014 Central Prison — Qazvin Young Journalists Club
    41 Nahid Ghiasvand Dec. 16, 2014 Orumieh Prison –
    42 unnamed woman Dec. 17, 2014 Central Prison — Tabriz –
    43 Nahid Dec. 24, 2014 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj Tabnak Website
    44 unnamed woman Dec. 27, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    45 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    46 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    47 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    48 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    49 Marzie Hossein Zehi Feb. 28, 2015 Kerman Prison –
    50 Mehrnoush Ghavvassi Mar. 07, 2015 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj –
    51 unnamed woman Mar. 07, 2015 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj –
    52 F Yousefi 48 Apr. 25, 2015 Central Prison — Rasht Justice Department of Gilan
    53 Batool A May. 13, 2015 Central Prison — Arak –
    54 Fateme Mehrabani 39 May. 30, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    55 unnamed woman May. 30, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    56 unnamed woman 32 Jun. 09, 2015 announced in the press w/o place Young Journalists Club
    57 Paridokht Molaie far 43 Jul. 29, 2015 Ghezelhesar Prison — Karaj –
    58 unnamed woman Jul. 30, 2015 Shahab Prison — Kerman –
    59 Fatemeh Hadadi 39 Aug. 10, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    60 Fatemeh Salbehi 23 Oct. 16, 2015 Adel Abad Prison — Shiraz Salamat News — Health Ministry
    61 Hajar Safari Nov. 12, 2015 Central Prison — Tabriz –
    62 F Zanjanian Dec. 06, 2015 Central Prison — Qazvin Parsineh website
    63 Zahra Nemati Jan. 06, 2016 Central Prison — Tabriz
    64 Ameneh Rezaiian 43 Apr.14,2016 Prison of Kashmar
    65 unnamed woman Apr. 14, 2016 central prison of Birjand
    66 unnamed woman Apr. 14, 2016 central prison of Birjand
    67 Zeinab Chamani 27 Apr. 25, 2016 Sari Prison Justice Department of Sari-without mentioning the victim’s name or gender
    68 unnamed woman Jun. 02, 2016 Young Journalists Club Central Prison of Qazvin
    69 unnamed woman Jul.17,2016 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj
    70 unnamed woman Aug. 25, 2016 Central Prison — Yazd State-run Iran newspaper
    71 Moluk Nouri Sep. 29, 2016 Central Prison — Orumieh .
    72 unnamed woman January 15, 2017 Central Prison — Karaj
    73 unnamed woman January 15, 2017 Central Prison — Karaj .
    74 unnamed woman March 4, 2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    75 unnamed woman March 4, 2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    76 unnamed woman May/3/2017 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj
    77 unnamed woman May/3/2017 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj
    78 Zeinab Sa’adanlou July/1/2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    79 unnamed woman 25 July/26/2017 Central Prison — Babol
    State-run Ganjineh and Shabtab News
    80 unnamed woman July 26, 2017 Central Prison — Orumieh
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:46 pm on August 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Iran women's rights, ,   

    Iran: Bleak future awaits young brides 

     

    41,000 children under 15 years of age get married every year in Iran.

    Social scientist and writer, Rayeheh Mozaffarian, announced these figures on the marriage of girl children in Iran and added, “37,117 girls under 15 years of age got married in 2014 with men of various ages, while 1,249 girls in this age got divorced.”

    Mozaffarian also revealed that the largest number of girls getting married under 10 years of age are in the southeastern province of Sistan and Baluchistan. Next in line are the provinces of Razavi Khorassan, East Azerbaijan, and Khuzistan for marriages of girl children between 10 and 14 years of age in 2014.

    Mozaffarian added, “Early pregnancy inflicts the greatest psychological and physical damages on married girl children… Presently, nearly 1,700 pregnant mothers less than 15 years of age are experiencing their first pregnancy.”

    She also said, “Based on research done, the largest number of mothers who die between 25 and 30 years of age belong to (the southern Iranian) Province of Hormuzgan. On the average, these women have given birth to three children up to this age. After the third delivery, they face the risk of death.” (The official IRNA news agency, July 30, 2017)

     
    • bluemoone 2:45 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      They should be in school and planning for college. Has that always been one is that a byproduct of the US meddling?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 7:18 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      Yes, you’re right dear Danielle, they should be in school, but unfortunately this is situation of women and girls and all of people in Iran under rule of religious dictatorship. Thanks for comment, good luck.

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:22 pm on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 12:10 am on August 3, 2017 Permalink

      I know you and others are working to bring more freedom to Iran. I lend my voice to your cause. The strength of the people is always stronger than the oppressors’. I look forward to the day when circumstances change for all.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:32 am on August 3, 2017 Permalink

      Many thanks Danielle, you are a great friend and a great supporter of human rights. It’s my pleasure friendship with you. Good luck.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 7:47 am on August 4, 2017 Permalink

      Mine too

      Liked by 1 person

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