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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:07 am on December 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: FLogging, Iran women's rights, , , Young Woman   

    Iran: Flogging Sentence for a Young Kurdish Female Student 

    Flogging a young woman

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran condemns the flogging sentence issued for a young Kurdish female student and calls on the Iranian women and youth to protest against such criminal verdicts.

    The NCRI Women’s Committee urges international human rights and women’s rights organizations to undertake effective measures to stop such cruel and inhuman punishments.

    On December 7, the Student Day in Iran, the clerical regime’s court in Saqqez, Iranian Kurdistan, sentenced Zamaneh Zivi to cash fine and 50 lashes of the whip on the charge of “disruption of public order.” She is a senior student of law at Payam Noor University of Saqqez in Kurdistan.

    The Iranian regime’s resort to such an inhuman punishment for a girl student only indicates its fear of rebellions by the Iranian people, particularly the students and youth. It also reveals the true nature of Rouhani, the mullahs’ president who pretends to be a moderate.

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran
    December 14, 2017

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  • Masoud Dalvand 7:38 pm on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Iran women's rights, NCRI Women's Committee Monthly Report - November2017, Women's Sport   

    Iran: The Grim State of Women’s Sports 

    Women's report

    The Grim State of Women’s Sports

    Numerous reports emerged in November on wide-ranging issues and shed light on the abysmal conditions of women’s sports in Iran.

    No budget for women’s sports2

    Lack of financial support forced the women’s basketball team of Gorgan to refrain from participating in the cross-country games.

    Gorgan is the capital of the northern Iranian province of Golestan.

    The vice-president of the basketball delegation of Golestan said the team had 12 years of experience in professional sports. Soghra Mohebbi said, “The budget predicted for the participation of the women’s team in this tournament was 50 million toumans but no agency stepped forward to provide the budget for supporting the women’s team. One of their reasons was that the games are not broadcast by the national media so the private sector does not feel motivated to spend money on these games.” (The state-run radio and television news agency – November 17, 2016)

    The Pars Jonoubi Jam football team did not participate in the league in November due to lack of budget, and their game was easily cancelled.

    In October, the girls’ basketball team was removed from the Asian U16 games because of the Iranian federation’s $325K debt to FIBA. The team was to take part in the official event for the first time after 37 years. (The state-run ISNA news agency – October 21, 2017)

    No media coverage allowed on women’s games

    It is forbidden to broadcast women’s competitions in Iran.

    The women’s national futsal team, champion of Asia, hosted Italy’s team in Tehran on November 23 and 24, 2017, while no photographers or cameramen were allowed in the stadium.

    The only picture was taken at the end of the games in an empty stadium while Italian players had to cover their hair with pink shawls. (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 24, 2017)

    No job security for female coaches3

    The head coach of the women’s national futsal team complained of lack of job security. In reaction to the Football Federation’s objection, Shahrzad Mozaffar said, “If my contract was for 50% of male coaches’ contracts, I would confidently concentrate on the national team. If I have job security, I will stay with the team.  But if I quit my other job today as head coach of a club team, I would not have job security and a stable income.” (The state-run IRNA – November 23, 2017)

    No adequate place for the games

    Some of the teams participating in the Futsal League had not been allocated a field where they could play.

    The fields where the games took place were peppered with holes and ditches making it impossible for the players to dribble.

    It was also reported that the restrooms and locker facilities were not adequate for the teams to get ready for the game. (Iranwire news agency – November 3, 2017)

    The Vice-President of Women’s Basketball, Fatemeh Karamzadeh, said the absence of a basketball court for women is a real predicament for women’s basketball. “In a country that so much underlines gender segregation in sports, women do not have even one court to play their games,” Karamzadeh admitted. (The state-run ISNA news agency, November 1, 2017)

    No medical support for injured players4

    Zeinab Karimi, footballer of the Kheibar women’s team of Khorramabad (capital of Lorestan Province in western Iran), experienced an inhuman treatment after being injured in the field and suffering a dislocated shoulder.

    In an interview about her injury during the third week of women’s Football League she said, “I was injured in the 20thminute of the game. I remained suffering from pain beside the field until the end of the first half of the game. The supervisor did not even turn an eye on me. The ambulance driver came to me, but when I asked him to quickly take me to the hospital, he answered that ‘the supervisor does not allow this. Since you are not bleeding, we do not have permission to transfer you to hospital.’ After a while, I was taken to hospital by someone’s car.” “I waited for four hours in the hospital before being attended to because I had not been transferred by an ambulance. They did not even give me a chair to sit,” she lamented. (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 5, 2017)

    Violation of FIFA universal rules

    The Iranian Football Federation briefed the teams participating in the Women’s Football League that players would be shown the yellow card if they do not properly cover all their hair during the games. If repeated, they would be shown the red card and sent off the field.

    Female champions are abandoned1

    Atousa Abbasi, a bronze medal winner in the Asian Bicycling Race and a record holder in women’s speed cycling in Iran, had to peddle in the streets for a while due to financial problems. She has been deprived of participating in cycling tournaments due to breaches made by her husband who is a cycling coach. (The state-run Mashreq website – October 18, 2017)

    Sousan Rashidi, who has been the champion of women’s kick boxing for eleven terms, is now training under difficult conditions for foreign tournaments. She is a nomad girl living in Kermanshah (western Iran). Due to poverty and lack of government support, she has to work in the village from early in the morning. She has to bake bread, take the sheep for grazing, bring log wood, etc. (The state-run Fararu website – October 18, 2017)

    Ms. Rashidi says, “Some days, I did not have my transportation fare to go for training. Sometimes, if I were given some money to buy an egg to eat, I saved the money to pay for my transportation.”

    “I became a champion for nine terms, but I did not receive any prize for these victories,” she added. (The state-run ISNA news agency – December 26, 2016)

    Rock climber Elnaz Rekabi won the gold medal of women’s Asian Bold Ring Cup. (The state-run ISCAnews.ir – October 29, 2017)

    In a short interview, she also complained about the difficulties of training without any government backing while being alone in her field. She said, “In Iran, I am very lonely. No one is ahead of me and they do not let me practice with boys.”

    Elnaz Rekabi also spoke on the problems created by the requirement of wearing the compulsory veil. “It is very hard with the veil especially when the weather is hot. I tried to find some proper outfit for this sport to observe the dress code, as well, but I had to do it on my own.” (Interview with Euronews – Aparat.com– April 25, 2016)

    Talented athletes drain

    Horrible conditions for female athletes has led many to leave the country.5

    Dorsa Derakhshani who had been banned from the Iranian national chess team for attending the February 2017 international competition in Gibraltar without wearing the mandatory veil, has joined the U.S. team.

    Dorsa Derakhshani was awarded the titles Woman Grandmaster and International Master at the age of 18 by the World Chess Federation in 2016. She had taken part in several international competitions without covering her hair.

    Dorsa moved to Spain in 2015 after she received an invitation by a chess club that also supported her studies. (The state-run ISNA news agency – October 2, 2017)

    Faezeh Kazemi, Handball player from Qazvin Province, joined the Metropolitan team in Turkey in late November.

    Ban on women’s presence in sports stadiums

    Iranian women were refused entry to the World Cup football match that took place on September 5, 2017, at Tehran’s Azadi Stadium between the national teams of Syria and Iran.6

    The Guardian wrote, “Syrian women are allowed into stadium but Iranian women are kept out, despite initially being allowed to buy tickets… A group of women who went to Tehran’s gigantic Azadi stadium were told they could not enter. When they started demonstrating they were threatened with arrest.”

    The State Security forces expelled three young women who were attempting to enter Azadi Stadium to watch the football match between the two most prominent Iranian football teams.

    The incident took place on October 26, 2017, when Persepolis and Esteghlal teams were scheduled to face off. The female fans had donned men’s clothes in a bid to enter the stadium. (The state-run Rokna.ir– October 26, 2017)

    Shahindokht Molaverdi, Rouhani’s Deputy for Citizen’s Rights Affairs, had recently admitted that the conditions are not yet prepared for women’s presence in football stadiums. (The state-run Entekhab website – October 25, 2017)

    The Iranian regime’s ban on entry of women to stadiums was also noted by the UN Special Rapporteur on human rights on Iran. In Article 92 of her report, she wrote:

    Women continue to be banned from watching sporting events in stadiums, and several female athletes have been restricted from participation in international tournaments either by State sporting agencies or by their husbands.

    She also noted in her report that in March, a number of Iranian female billiard players were banned from competitions, allegedly for “violating the Islamic code of conduct.”

    In April, female participants in an international marathon held in Tehran were required to run separately from men and on a shortened route.”

    Khamenei and religious scholars weigh in

    Religious scholars also underlined the prohibition of women’s entry to sports stadiums.

    “The issue was tabled by the previous government but the Supreme Leader and other religious authorities opposed it,” stated Mullah Makarem Shirazi and added, “It is a deviation to bring up this issue, again.” (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 29, 2017)

    Mullah Nouri Hamedani also tried to justify the ban by saying, “It is not permissible for men and women to be present in the same sports event because women cannot properly hold their veil.” (The state-run Razavi news agency – November 29, 2017)

    The mullahs’ supreme leader Ali Khamenei also underlined the ban on women’s bicycling in public. Under the pretext of responding to religious questions, he reiterated, “Women’s bicycling in public areas and in places that could be seen by strange men is not allowed.” (The state-run ILNA news agency – November 26, 2017)7

    The above facts which are a handful from a ton, show the numerous obstacles created by Iran’s ruling regime to exclude women from the sports arena. They also help one realize that Iran’s women are not only talented but really hard working and motivated to show their competence at every opportunity despite lack of any form of government support.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:33 pm on November 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Iran women's rights, ,   

    International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Those whose sufferings are not seen or heard. 

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:14 am on November 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: DomesticViolence, , , , Iran women's rights, , , , VAW, ,   

    International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women 

    25

    International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women:

    150 years of Iranian women’s struggle:

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:02 pm on November 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran women's rights, ,   

    Iran: Where the regime opposes women’s rights 

    Women pray for Iranian soldiers killed during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war at the Imamzadeh Saleh shrine in Tehran on August 2, 2017. (Reuters)

    Every year, the day November 25 comes as a grim reminder that we have a long way to go for achieving gender parity. There are still many countries in the world where women cannot fully exercise the right to shape their own destiny. Violence against women is another detestable vestige of the mostly patriarchal societies inherited by our generation.

    It may seem that we have come a long way since the Dark Ages, but there are still some countries in the world that have made little progress in according equal rights to women and men. There is even a country where misogyny is the order of the day and where women have no legal rights.

    It may come as a shock to many, but Iran continues to run in this way. The Iranian regime may keep up pretences in public on issues related to women’s rights, but in practice women remain second class citizens in that country.

    Subhuman treatment of women

    It is not difficult to prove that Iranian theocrats are opposed to the idea of gender equality. Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has been quoted as saying: “Gender equality is ‘Zionist plot’ aimed at corrupting the role of women in society.” In Iran’s version of religious law, women are considered property.

    Their inheritance is half of what men receive and women are not allowed to leave the country without their husband’s consent. They are also forced to observe a very strict dress code. There are several security measures in place in Iran to impose these laws. The most repressive one is the infamous ‘morality police’ that roams around cities arresting young women for not observing the dress code.

    There are gruesome videos on YouTube and other social media showing how women are treated in Iran for what they wear. In a recent incident, a 14-year-old girl was beaten and detained for wearing ripped jeans in Iran (one of many such cases of police brutality against women). After her arrest by Islamic Revolutionary Guard Coups (IRGC) unit, she said: “I still carry the bruises sustained from their beatings on my face … my ribs still hurt.”

    ANALYSIS: Iranian regime and its appalling violation of children’s rights

    Women in Iran are also banned from entering sports stadiums. In a recently reported case by Human Rights Watch (HRW), a woman named Mina tried to get under the radar of security forces to watch a volleyball match in 2016. Despite her attempt to watch the match from the roof top of a café near a volleyball stadium, she and a few other women were caught by IRGC and were evicted from their vantage point.

    Irrespective of their position in society, women in Iran have no right to travel without the consent of their husband or father. Hassan Rouhani and his predecessor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had once made bogus promises of giving women more rights in order to garner their votes. In May this year, Rouhani had spread the word that he might appoint a women minster in his cabinet. But soon after his sham election he did not include any woman in his cabinet.

    Women in Iran are legally required to wear a hijab in public and this law is strictly enforced by morality police. (Photo courtesy: Iran Human Rights)

    Iranian women defy repression

    However, Iranian women seize every opportunity to show their resistance against their ill-treatment by the regime. After Khamenei’s ridiculous fatwa banning women from riding a bike in public last year, women in Iran came out in droves riding their bikes in defiance. According to the state-run media, Khamenei issued a decree on 10 September 2016 wherein he said: “Riding a bicycle often attracts the attention of men and exposes the society to corruption, and as contravenes women’s chastity so it must be abandoned”.

    Since the first day of the installation of the regime, Iranian women have resisted their attempts at oppression. Back in the day, Iran like other countries of the Middle East could hardly imagine any role for women other than staying at home and taking care of children.

    One woman took the lead in this struggle for freedom which was no longer about just freeing Iranian women but the entire Iranian society, which was taken hostage by the regime. Maryam Rajavi, president of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), an educated woman has done the impossible and instilled thousands of Iranian men and women with the idea that all citizens in the country can struggle for a common cause: Freedom.

    ALSO READ: Iran Guards ‘recruiting Afghan children as young as 14’ to fight in Syria

    She has proven through her leadership role that the same deprived and underprivileged woman is no different than her male counterpart in struggling for a free and democratic society. She has built a blueprint for building a better Iran with her 10-point plan, wherein women are deemed fully equal to men in all spheres of social activity.

    There would be no limits for women in this new Iran. Filling the highest political positions will no longer be just a dream for women. The Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK) — the biggest Iranian opposition group and a member of the NCRI — has followed her teachings for years and is now led by her.

    Violence against women in Iran is institutionalized simply because half of the society is treated as crippled and in need of guidance from men; be it the male head of the family or males in the state itself. Thus, the status of women will never change in Iran as long as the present regime is in power.

    ______________________
    Reza Shafiee (@shafiee_shafiee) is a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI).

    Source: Iran: Where the regime opposes women’s rights

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 3:03 pm on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran women's rights,   

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence. 

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence.
    The Coroner’s Office of Tehran, capital of Iran, declared that it has registered the names of 12,159 women as victims of violence in four months.
    The public relations of the General Department of the Coroner’s Office of Tehran Province announced that in the four months since the beginning of the Persian New Year (March 21, 2017) until July 21, 2017, it has registered the names of 33,362 people, 12,159 of them women, who had referred to the forensic centers of Tehran province due to injuries they suffered in physical fights. (The state-run Mehr news agency – September 23, 2017)

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/iran-women-news/4327-iran-over-12-000-women-registered-as-victims-of-violence

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:19 pm on September 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran women's rights   

    Iran: Forced marriage of small girls is on the rise 

    Forced marriage of young girls is on the rise in East Azerbaijan Province, northwestern Iran. This was announced by the deputy for cultural and youth affairs in the Department of Sports and Youths of East Azerbaijan.  Amir Taghizadeh said girl children between 10 and 15 years of age are forced into marriage.

    “About 4,000 girls between 10 and 15 years of age got married in 2015. The figure reached 4,164 in 2016,” he noted.Taghizadeh also revealed that these girls are forced to marry men between 29 and 35 years of age. “East Azerbaijan is second to Khorassan Razavi province in marriage of girl children aging between 10 and 15.” He pointed out that divorce rate is high in child marriages. (The state run Kayhan newspaper – September 5, 2017 )

    Forcible_marriage_EN

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:03 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran women's rights,   

    Iran regime continues to bar Iranian women from going to sport stadiums 

    women-behind-the-stadum

    TEHRAN (AFP), 04 September 2017  – For a brief moment, Iran’s female football fans thought they were finally allowed to attend a match, but their hopes were dashed on Monday when authorities said their tickets were sold by mistake.

    Women have been barred from attending football matches, and some other sporting events such as wrestling, since the 1979 Islamic revolution, with officials saying they must be protected from the vulgar atmosphere.

    But when seats for Tuesday’s qualifying match against Syria at Tehran’s Azadi stadium went on sale on Saturday, many were shocked to see an option for women’s tickets on the website.

    Some shared their surprise and joy on Twitter with a Farsi hashtag meaning ‘I_have_ticket’.

    ‘I was extremely excited… it was unbelievable,’ football fan Arefeh Elyasi told the Shahrvand newspaper on Monday.

    Another woman, Zahra Jafarzadeh, said she bought a ticket even though she does not really like football.

     

    what is the official explanation for the ban? There isn’t any.

         What is the official explanation for the ban? There isn’t any

    ‘I felt that if didn’t sign up, I would be missing a major event,’ she told the newspaper.

    Having never been inside the stadium, some worried about which seat to choose.

    ‘My friend’s mother told me to get a seat where the ball wouldn’t hit my head,’ said Negin Bagheri.

    But it did not take long for reality to reimpose itself, as Iran’s football federation said it was all a mistake.

    ‘There is no plan to allow the presence of women in Azadi stadium for the Iran-Syria match,’ it said in a statement, blaming a ‘technical glitch’.

    Tickets held by women would all be cancelled and refunded, it said.

    ‘Maybe we all knew that we would not be allowed to enter the stadium despite buying the ticket,’ Elyasi said.

    ‘But we wanted to make our voice heard by the officials.’

    Iran was among the first teams to qualify for the 2018 world cup finals in Russia, and celebrations are planned for after the Syria game.

    Azadi Stadium

    Azadi Stadium

    Women are allowed to watch some sports, though the rules can change with little warning.

    There was shock in 2014 when women were suddenly banned from volleyball matches without explanation, although they have since been allowed to return to some events in segregated seats.

    Source: Iran regime continues to bar Iranian women from going to sport stadiums

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:28 am on August 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran women's rights, Misogynism of Mullahs,   

    Iran: Judiciary official opposes adoption of VAW bill 

    VAW

    “The bill on combating violence against women (in Iran) has been drafted from a merely sexual perspective.”

    Making this comment on August 24, 2017, legal deputy to the Judiciary, Zabihollah Khoda’ian, expressed his opposition to the adoption of the VAW bill. He justified his view by the fact that 70 out of 100 articles of the bill are “criminalizing”, “setting prison sentences for even the slightest tensions between couples.”

    If adopted, the VAW bill is going to be named “provision of security for women against violence”, and it mostly focuses on domestic violence overlooking pervasive violence committed against Iranian womenevery day at the workplace, in the streets and public places, and in prisons by the so-called law enforcement and plainclothes agents, Revolutionary Guards and Bassij, as well as government and private sector employers and employees.

    According to Hossein Ashtari, Commander of the State Security Force, an average of 2000 women are forcibly and violently arrested every day across Iran and mistreated and humiliated in detention centers for not fully observing the compulsory veil.

    At the same time, hundreds of rights activists are tortured and maltreated in Iranian prisons.

    As for domestic violence, Tehran’s forensic officials declared in January 2017, that after road accidents and street fights, the main reason for referring to the Coroner’s Office in Tehran is harassment by husbands. On the average, 52 women refer to the Coroner’s Office every day.

    This is only “less than 35 per cent” of the cases of domestic violence which are reported. According to Mohammad Ali Esfanani, spokesman of the legal and judicial committee in the parliament, in December 2014, “out of 180 complaints, 128 are not interested in following up their complaint.”

    In 2014, Rouhani’s deputy on women and family affairs Shahindokht Molaverdi revealed that 32 volumes of books containing the outcome of a national research done on domestic violence against women “have been lost” and no copies of them can be found “in the Ministry of Interior or the directorate for women and family affairs.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:11 am on August 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Farzaneh Jalali, , , Iran women's rights,   

    Iran: Repeated summoning of Farzaneh Jalali to Intelligence Department 

    Farzaneh Jalali

    Farzaneh Jalali

    Women and children’s rights activist, Farzaneh Jalali, has been repeatedly summoned to the Intelligence Department of Kermanshah, western Iran, to be interrogated.

    Ms. Jalali’s lawyer, Mostafa Ahmadian said, “The verbal summoning of his client has been illegal and the interrogations have made her upset.”

    Ahmadian asserted, “Unfortunately, my client has cooperated (so far), but I have asked her to ignore such calls until she receives written summon or emails based on legal standards.”

    “My client is under pressure from many respects and I am not legally allowed to speak about them,” Ahmadian added.

    Mostafa Ahmadian also declared that his client’s case has been declared inaccessible which is illegal and for this reason, he is not informed of the content of the case and the reasons based on which Ms. Jalali has been charged with “action against national security.”

    Farzaneh Jalali is a women’s rights activist from Kermanshah. For her activities, she was deprived of college education. On February 24, 2017, she was arrested by security forces and taken to the detention center at Naft Square of Kermanshah. On March 13, 2017, she was released from prison on a heavy bail of 300 million toumans.

    Ms. Jalali is a graduate of social anthropology from Tehran University, a former member of the students’ Islamic Association, and former editor of the university’s Sobh Daily. Despite the fact that she had passed the graduate school’s admission test with the sixth highest scores in 2010, she was deprived of continuing her education due to her student activities.

    Over the past years, she has been active with regards to women and children’s rights. She was active in gaining support for the students burned in the fire incident at a girls’ school in Shinabad Village, West Azerbaijan Province. She has also written and published a number of articles in defense of women’s rights and violations of their rights.

     
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