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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:02 pm on 13 May 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran nuclear porgram   

    How Iran’s regime is left to choose bad from worse 

    Iran's ballistic missile program is the most important part of the country's nuclear program

    Iran’s ballistic missile program is the most important part of the country’s nuclear program

    PMOI/MEK staff writer

    May 12, 2018 – Iranian regime supreme leader Ali Khamenei has time and again changed his position on the Iran nuclear deal. Now and then he would canvas the accord, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), as a “making of various officials,” attempting to distance himself from any negative consequences. It is now known that all the while, Iranian nuclear negotiators enjoyed his blessing to become completely involved in talks with the “Great Satan,” read the United States.

    However, following U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the JCPOA, all of a sudden Khamenei claimed, “Didn’t I say you can’t trust their words?”

    Khamenei intends to place the entire JCPOA blame burden on the faction of Iranian regime President Hassan Rouhani. All the while, in the same speech he said he has told them “to get true guarantees before entering any agreements.”

    “I don’t trust these three countries either,” Khamenei added referring to the United Kingdom, France, and Germany.

    These contradictory remarks of seeking “true guarantees” while having no trust in the European Troika all signal the very grave crisis the Iranian regime is engulfed in. As a reminder, last year Khamenei boasted of torching the JCPOA and shredding it to pieces if the U.S. exited the accord. Now Khamenei and his regime are literally on their knees begging the Europeans.

    “It is now crystal clear that his second JCPOA will be very negative in comparison to the first round. Even if the negotiating team seeks guarantees from the Europeans, which [Khamenei] believes is unlikely, this second JCPOA will be nothing like the initial version,” according to the state-run Sharq daily.

    This means the Europeans will not be able to resolve anything for Iran’s regime. Khamenei understands this better than anyone. Having no other option is the reason he refuses to acknowledge this subject.

    In an attempt to save face, Rouhani recently said, “The JCPOA will either remain or be terminated. If it stays, it will remain in full. Otherwise, everyone will say goodbye.”

    It is worth noting that the Iranian regime’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif has time and again, “It is all or nothing.”

    At the end of the day, the Iranian regime must choose between the return of crippling sanctions and the pre-JCPOA circumstances under the UN Charter’s Chapter 7 conditions, or succumb to demands and enter new negotiations with bloodied knees. This will lead to further and increasing demands, targeting the very essence known as the Iranian regime.

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  • Masoud Dalvand 7:58 pm on 25 Apr 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran Desperate for US to Keep Nuclear Deal 

    Iran Nuclear Deal

     Radio America Online News Bureau April 24th, 2018 – President Trump’s instinct is to scrap the Iran nuclear deal while French President Emmanuel Macron is willing to amend it but not rescind it without another plan in place, but a leading figure in the Iranian resistance says the deal doesn’t stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons but does help the radical mullahs stay in power.

    President Trump has until May 12 to declare whether Iran is in compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA and whether the U.S. will remain a party to the seven-nation agreement.

     

    Alireza JafarzadehA_Jafarzadeh

    deputy director of the National Council of Resistance of Iran, says despite Tehran’s bluster about exiting the deal if the U.S. does, the Iranian leaders badly need the agreement to continue.

    “There’s no way the Iranian regime wants to lose this agreement.  They want to do everything possible to keep it because the regime knows that absent this agreement, there’s really not too many other options left for them,” said Jafarzadeh, who says threats to the contrary are nothing but “hot air.”.

    He says that’s because internal unrest is reaching a boiling point.

    “The regime is facing tremendous problems domestically, particularly on the economic side of it.  We’ve seen the uprising going on since December that was built around the economic corruption in Iran and the high rise in prices for very basic food.  Inflation is so high.  Inflation is skyrocketing,” said Jafarzadeh.

    Iran is clamping down on media outlets and social media, so reports of the ongoing protests are hard to find, but Jafarzadeh says they are still going strong and are appearing in many different parts of the country.

    “The protests are continuing ever since they started.  It expanded to 142 cities starting back in December,” said Jafarzadeh, listing off a number of cities seeing major protests in the past several days.

    “Every week there is a new hot spot in Iran.  People are chanting with the same intensity against the regime, making significant demands, none of which the regime can really meet,” said Jafarzadeh.

    He says some chants even explicitly scold the government for blaming its problems on America and stating that only the Iranian regime is to blame.

    Keeping the deal in place is critical for the Iranian leaders because the money that flowed back into Iran from the agreement has been trumpeted as the solution to Iran’s economic problems.

    However, even that good fortune could soon backfire on Iran’s leadership.

    “Once the people realize that all the money that was given to the Iranian regime ended up in the pocket of the mullahs, the ayatollahs, and the Revolutionary Guard.  It was basically the military structure and the clerical structure that benefited from that.

    “Imagine if there’s more pressure built against the regime what kind of political problems it’s going to create for the Iranian regime,” said Jafarzadeh.

    The more pertinent issue for Trump, Macron, and other world leaders is whether the JCPOA is actually preventing the advancement of Iran’s nuclear program.  Jafarzadeh is convinced it doesn’t.

    “The agreement has kept almost all of the nuclear infrastructure of the Iranian regime intact.  It has allowed the research and development of more advanced centrifuges that could actually enrich uranium much faster and more efficiently further down the road.

    “It hasn’t put any meaningful restrictions on the missile program of the Iranian regime, which is really marching forward with more missile tests on nuclear-capable ballistic missiles.  And it has this ridiculous sunset clause.  In a few years, all those restrictions on the nuclear program are removed,” said Jafarzadeh.

    And he says the hurdles to inspections make enforcement of the existing deal virtually impossible.

    “Most importantly, there’s no serious access and inspection of a number of nuclear sites where the core of the nuclear program of Iran is.  It’s not just the enrichment but the weaponization part of the program.  We exposed at least six nuclear sites we believe need to be inspected,” said Jafarzadeh.

    He says the bottom line is the JCPOA doesn’t stop Iran from getting nukes.

    “As of now, the current restrictions are not sufficient enough to prevent the Iranian regime from developing nuclear weapons further down the road,” said Jafarzadeh.

     

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:42 am on 22 Sep 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Iran nuclear porgram, , , , ,   

    US Politicians Gather to Criticise Iran Regime on Same Day as Trump Addresses UN 

    Iran Focus

    London, 21 Sep – As Donald Trump prepared to speak out against the Iranian Regime and its nuclear deal in his address the United Nations General Assembly, on Tuesday, a non-governmental organization which also opposes the deal was holding its annual summit nearby.

    United against Nuclear Iran (UANI), a bipartisan group chaired by former US Senator Joseph Lieberman, seeks to keep Iran from developing nuclear weapons.

    In his opening remarks to the summit, Lieberman praised the Trump administration for their actions so far on Iran, including the introduction of non-nuclear sanctions against the rogue state.

    Middle East

    While David Petraeus, a retired US Army General, and Prince Turki Al Faisal bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud, chairman of the King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies, both warned of the dangers of focusing all of America’s attention in the Middle East on terrorism, stating that it is also important to focus on the actions of regional governments like Iran.

    Petraeus advised that the US should work with their allies in the Middle East in order to obtain peace, while Al Faisal warned that Iran’s growing control over the region, especially in Syria, will come back to haunt the international community.

    Jeb Bush, former governor of Florida, and Bill Richardson, former governor of New Mexico, warned that a foreign policy that put America First could ultimately lead to isolationism and in fact, help the threat of Iran grow.

    Nuclear Threat

    Bush and Richardson instead encouraged using the Iranian nuclear deal, which they were critical of, as leverage and expanding sanctions. Bush stated that one way to do this would be to expand sanctions across Iran’s Revolutionary Guards as a whole, as opposed to targeting select members.

    Senator Mark Kirk, Congressman Ron DeSantis, and former congressman Steve Israel, who all voted against the deal, took to the stage shortly after Trump’s UN speech was broadcast to support his tough talk on Iran.

    Kirk said that he believed that Trump would not recertify Iran at the upcoming October deadline; a move that would allow Congress to impose nuclear sanctions against the Regime.

    DeSantis and Israel noted that without a Democratic President, Iran sceptics within the Democratic Party may be more inclined to vote for Iran sanctions.

    The summit was overwhelmingly in favour of Trump’s tough talk on Iran and hoped that it would turn into tough action soon in order to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:28 pm on 8 Aug 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iran nuclear porgram, , Terroism   

    ANALYSIS: Iran’s quest for nuclear weapons and regional domination 

    Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Speaker Ali Larijani, and Iranian President Hasan Rouhani during Rouhani’s swearing in ceremony in Tehran on August 3, 2017. (AFP)

    Besides their policing duties within Iran’s borders, the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) was put in charge of the country’s clandestine nuclear program in the 1980s, taking full charge of the regime’s quest for nuclear weapons. With its hard-line commanders determined to lead the most powerful army in the Middle East, it needed sophisticated weapon systems to achieve this, and nuclear weapons soon became an obsession.

    The full achievements made in the construction of these devices, will never be allowed to come to light, until those weapons are ready to be unveiled to the world; although, throughout the years, much intelligence has come to light to show the IRGC are well on course to achieving their goal.

    With nationalistic fervour having always been at the forefront of the Guards revolutionary goals, they would never give up the quest for such a weapon. They feel that by possessing such an arsenal of weapons, they could steer Iran toward full control of the Middle East, as well as a handy tool for warding off an attack from the US or Israel, who would fear the catastrophic retaliation from Iran over such an attack.

    With the Guards in total control of the procurement of weapons of mass destruction, they have supervised the construction of a vast network of underground facilities across Iran. The Iranian regime has claimed for decades that their nuclear program will be used to produce isotopes for medical purposes, and not to pursue a bomb. But with a vast amount of intelligence to prove otherwise, with all evidence pointing to a nuclear weapons program, it has to be assumed that Iranian boffins have been working on such weapons since the early days of Khomeini setting up the Islamic Republic of Iran.

    Substantial documentation

    There is substantial documentation to show that the Iranian regime has been for many years seeking equipment and expertise with which to build a nuclear device. Over the years, vast amounts of intelligence have come from many sources when it comes to Iran’s nuclear program.

    In 2005, it came to light through the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), how Iran was in possession of quantities of polonium-210 and beryllium, plus the know-how to make a “neutron generator” that is needed to trigger a fission chain reaction, all key elements that are essential in the construction of a nuclear weapon.

    With so much secrecy behind its nuclear program, plus the fact that underground nuclear facilities have been uncovered by the Iranian opposition group the MEK, and indisputable evidence that the Iranians have been building nuclear capable missiles, which they have been testing in recent months, this all seems to point toward the regime seeking a full nuclear capability for its military forces, and they could reach their goal in the very near future.

    The deal

    Hassan Rouhani
    #NO2Rouhani 

    So as far as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) policing its nuclear program as part of the Iran Deal is concerned, with the Iranian regime refusing the IAEA full access to secret bunkers such as Parchin, and its nuclear program just stalled and not dismantled, the agreement isn’t worth the paper it is printed on.

    At the time of the Iran Deal, it was strongly believed that Iran’s nuclear weapon was close to completion, with already an arsenal of missiles capable of carrying them stored in underground bunkers ready to launch, many aimed at the Gulf states, and American military facilities in the area.

    But such were the derisory sanctions placed against the regime by the West, headed by the Obama administration; Iran’s nuclear program has in effect only been suspended, which makes it possible for its boffins to restart it at any time. So, with Iran having received continued assistance from North Korea, a country that already has a functional nuclear device, as well as the capability to fit one to a missile, the scenario of full cooperation becomes ever scarier.

    Defense systems

    Also, through the millions of dollars handed back to Iran, the regime has strengthened both its internal defenses through the application of new air defense systems, as well as updating arms and equipment for its armed forces, making it a much bigger threat to its neighbors than ever before. As well as this, the amount of money it has had returned through the Iran Deal, has helped tremendously in bankrolling its military campaigns in Iraq, Syria and Yemen.

    So, by participating in this new game of diplomacy, which it has been playing very well, Iran’s clerical leadership is planning to be in the nuclear deceit game for the long haul. If they can keep the West playing along with them, the mullahs will be able to build up Iran’s inner security, and with its new strengthened military, it will have the ability to repel both internal dissent, and any outside invader, showing its neighbours that it is a country to be both feared and reckoned with.

    Then no sooner is its economy booming, with its armed forces the most sophisticated in the Middle East, and its air defences second to none, the regime will finish building its long sought after nuclear weapon. Having reached the stage where it feels no outside force can stop it, the true belligerence of its leadership will take over, and their long sought after nuke will be revealed to the world.

    But at least, now that Donald Trump is in charge of the White House, fresh sanctions have been put in place; but only time will tell how far the new president will go in confronting Iran, and in what form this confrontation will take.

    Source Al Arabiya English: ANALYSIS: Iran’s quest for nuclear weapons and regional domination

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:33 am on 14 Jul 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran nuclear porgram, ,   

    France and US must unite in standing up to Iran 

    Trump Macron

    27144-0yujr3cgczk-plfyx  By Giulio Terzi

    France shares a dubious distinction with my own home country of Italy. Both were among the first to send business delegations and enter into new trade agreements with the Islamic Republic of Iran following the implementation of the Iran nuclear deal, or Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) — what President Donald Trump is famous for describing as “the worst deal ever negotiated.”

    In a joint press conference with his French counterpart, President Emmanuel Macron, in Paris on Thursday, President Trump said, “Today we face new threats from rogue regimes like North Korea, Iran and Syria, and the governments that finance and support them.”

    It is yet unclear what exactly the two presidents may have discussed when it comes to Iran, but one can hope they will present a united front standing against the regime going forward.

    High on the list of measures to halt Iran’s destructive behavior is an idea already floated by President Trump in his first weeks in office — designating the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps as a foreign terrorist organization and cutting off its access to American dollars.

    Macron, like Trump, took over for a predecessor who played a role in the nuclear negotiations and the associated, conciliatory policies toward the Islamic Republic.

    The question is whether France will continue to look the other way on Iranian misbehavior while pushing French business toward the unstable Iranian market? Or will President Macron reintroduce the extensive demands and high level of scrutiny that had guided French negotiations before the JCPOA was implemented?

    The French government has a particular responsibility to address the issues of Iranian misbehavior that have been shunted to the side.

    The French energy company Total SA announced this month that it would be helping Iran to develop a prominent off-shore gas field. This announcement was eagerly embraced by the mullahs in Tehran, who suggested that it would lead the way to more Western investments in the Islamic Republic, even if Iran continues to push the boundaries of the JCPOA while taking no steps to diminish the threat of terrorist-linked money laundering. In fact, Tehran seems committed to taking full advantage of the new conditions created by the nuclear deal, but without changing a single thing about its malign influence on the region or the world.

    France, of course, had a prominent hand in creating those new conditions, as one of the six parties that helped negotiate the JCPOA opposite Iran. To its credit, the French negotiating team developed a solid reputation for putting the highest demands upon the Islamic Republic. Nevertheless, the world ended up with a rather tepid deal, which offered Iran tens of billions of dollars’ worth of sanctions relief in exchange for fairly modest and completely reversible restrictions on the Iranian nuclear program. Meanwhile, peripheral issues remained entirely ignored, such as Iran’s ballistic missile development and contact with terrorist organizations and rogue states.

    Interestingly, President Macron’s meeting with President Trump takes place almost exactly two years after the nuclear negotiations were concluded. And if Iran was a major topic of discussion, this meeting has the potential to be very significant.

    The fact is that the nuclear deal only addressed one issue having to do with the Islamic Republic. The globally significant issues coming out of that country are manifold, and some of them have the potential for much more immediate and broad-ranging impact.

    Whereas the nuclear deal succeeds in pushing the threat of an Iranian nuclear weapon several years into the future, there are other things that could be done right now to quickly halt Iran’s destructive behavior.

    High on the list of such measures is an idea that was already floated by President Trump in his first weeks in office, when he suggested designating the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) as a foreign terrorist organization and cutting off its access to American dollars to the greatest extent possible.

    Whether President Trump broached the subject with Macron remains to be seen, but the French president should certainly take it upon himself to make a commitment to confronting Iran’s sponsorship of global terrorism. The IRGC is the main driving force behind that, and it is also perhaps the source of the most severe crackdowns on Iranian activism and civil society.

    In this sense, an international blacklist of the IRGC could serve not only to shrink Iran’s influence on nearby areas like Syria and Yemen but also to greatly diminish the power of the clerical regime at home, thereby improving the prospects for regime change driven by the overwhelmingly pro-Western and democratic Iranian people.

    The French capital was the site of a major international rally for Iranian regime change just two weeks before Thursday’s meeting with President Trump. The opposition coalition known as the National Council of Resistance of Iran held its annual gathering in Paris on July 1, with attendance from tens of thousands of Iranian expatriates and hundreds of political supporters spanning Europe, the Americas, and much of the world.

    NCRI President Maryam Rajavi used the opportunity to call attention to the thousands of protest actions that had taken place in Iran over the past year in defiance of the omnipresent risk of suppression and torture. The popular demand for regime change that was on display in the 2009 uprising is still bubbling beneath the surface of Iranian society, waiting for the conditions to be right for its reemergence. By blacklisting the IRGC, the international community can help to create those conditions and improve the prospects for an Iranian government based on Mrs. Rajavi’s progressive 10-point plan.

    Western voices should be focused on promoting the kind of future for Iran that will make it both a stable and a moral investment. President Macron and President Trump can take the lead in this, and if their talks in Paris demonstrate progress, other Western leaders will definitely take note, as well as the disenchanted Iranian people.

    Giulio Terzi, former Foreign Minister of Italy, is a member of United Against Nuclear Iran’s Advisory board.


    Originally published at http://www.foxnews.com on July 13, 2017.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:35 pm on 12 Jul 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Iran nuclear porgram,   

    Iran Raises the Stakes 

    Tehran’s expanding military capacity warrants a firm response from the Trump administration.

    By Lawrence J. Haas

    July 11, 2017


    With America’s global attention largely focused elsewhere, Iran continues to expand its military capabilities — legally and otherwise — forcing the question of what Washington and its regional allies plan to do about it.

    Iran’s military expansionism of late encompasses a host of activities: pursuing illegal means to expand its nuclear and ballistic missile technology and expertise; continuing to test its longer range and increasingly sophisticated ballistic missile; and building underground facilities in Lebanon to manufacture missiles and other weapons for its most powerful terrorist client Hezbollah.

    This expansionism is boosting the capacity of Iran, a Shiite nation, to threaten Israel and the region’s U.S.-backed Sunni states — most notably Saudi Arabia — raising the stakes for a U.S. administration that has wisely discarded President Barack Obama’s efforts at U.S.-Iranian rapprochement but not yet enunciated a comprehensive alternative.

    Secretary of State Rex Tillerson recently articulated the broad elements of a strategy: “Our policy towards Iran,” he told the House Foreign Affairs Committee in response to a question, “is to push back on [its regional] hegemony, contain their ability to develop, obviously, nuclear weapons and to work towards support of those elements inside of Iran that would lead to a peaceful transition of that government.”

    The question now is whether Tillerson was speaking for an administration that agrees on those elements and, if so, whether it is serious enough to put the building blocks of a comprehensive strategy in place — e.g., a close monitoring of Iranian compliance with the 2015 global nuclear agreement; greater U.S. economic sanctions in response to both Iran’s violations as well as its continuing terror-related efforts; closer U.S. military cooperation with its regional allies to counter Iran’s hegemonic ambitions; and a serious effort to engage with an Iranian populace that, to a great extent, finds the regime repugnant and yearns for more freedom and democracy.

    In three recent reports, German intelligence and other authorities have revealed that Tehran is working to illegally acquire technology and expertise to advance both its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. The reports revealed, for instance, that three German citizens were charged in connection with “the deliveries of 51 special valves to an Iranian company” that Iran could use for its Arak heavy water reactor — a reactor that can develop plutonium for nuclear weapons and that Iran was supposed to dismantle under the nuclear agreement. They also revealed that Iran was seeking the “products and scientific know-how” to develop “weapons of mass destruction as well [as] missile technology.”

    Meanwhile, Tehran dismissed Friday’s call by United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon that it stop its ballistic missile testing that he said violates the spirit of the nuclear agreement. That’s because Iran is testing missiles that could carry a nuclear warhead, reinforcing concerns that — despite its statements to the contrary — it plans to pursue nuclear weapons either by violating the agreement or waiting until it expires over the next decade or so.

    While continuing to test missiles of increasing range and sophistication, Tehran also revealed recently that it is building a third underground ballistic missile production facilityto further its program.

    Along with manufacturing weapons for its own use, Tehran is also building facilities in Lebanon to make weapons in conjunction with Hezbollah, a key Iranian terrorist proxy that continues to threaten Israel from across its northern border. That move comes in response to Israeli bombing of weapons factories in Sudan and supply routes through Syria for Iranian rocket shipments to Hezbollah.

    From one factory in northern Lebanon, Iran is manufacturing the Fateh 110 missile that, with a range of about 190 miles, can threaten most of Israel. From another factory in southern Lebanon, it’s making smaller weapons. Hezbollah, which had about 15,000 fairly unsophisticated rockets when it went to war with Israel in 2006, now has an estimated 150,000 rockets of increasing range and accuracy.

    All told, Tehran’s expanding military capabilities present a growing threat to Washington’s allies in Jerusalem, Riyadh and elsewhere, raising the prospect that, at some point, an emboldened Iran or Hezbollah will launch a war or a defensive Israel will take pre-emptive military action to reduce the threats.

    Either way, an administration that never shared Obama’s naive notion of bribing Tehran into moderation with some $100 billion or more of sanctions relief under the nuclear agreement now needs to take the next step — to fashion a comprehensive strategy that confronts the odious regime while putting its moral authority behind the millions of Iranians who would like nothing more than to topple it.

    Lawrence J. Haas OPINION CONTRIBUTOR

    Lawrence J. Haas, a senior fellow at the American Foreign Policy Council, is the author of, most recently, “Harry and Arthur: Truman, Vandenberg, and the Partnership That Created the Free World.”

    Source: Iran Raises the Stakes

     
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