Tagged: Human Rights Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Masoud Dalvand 8:23 am on 10 Aug 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Human Rights, ,   

    Amnesty International Calls on Iran Regime to Release All Protesters 

    Amnesty International Calls on Iran Regime to Release All Protesters

    The Iranian regime’s response to the largely peaceful protests that spread across Iran over the past week was mass arrests.

    In a letter dated August 8th, 2018, Amnesty International calls upon the Iranian authorities to release any individual held solely for peacefully taking part in the protests. They also called for authorities to conduct a prompt, impartial, and independent investigation into the killing of a protester in Karaj, north-west of the capital, Tehran, on August 3rd, 2018.

    Amnesty also urged the authorities to protect all detainees from torture and any other ill treatment, as well as to reveal the fate and whereabouts of dozens of detainees who have not been heard from since their arrests.

    Amnesty-International-Calls-on-Iran-Regime-to-Release-All-Protesters

    Arrests of Iranian protesters by secret agents of the Iranian regime during the August 2018 protests

    Human Rights Defender N. Afshari, is among those detained. He was arrested by Ministry of Intelligence officials on August 1st, 2018 in the city of Karaj, north-west of Tehran. His whereabouts are unknown. He believed to be held in a secret detention facility.

    High inflation and the steep devaluation of the rial have added to the economic crisis in Iran, sparking protests that began on July 31st. However, dozens of videos that have been shared on social media also show protesters chanting slogans opposing the political establishment — specifically, Iran’s Supreme Leader.

    By and large, the demonstrations appear to have been peaceful, but some protesters have engaged in acts of violence, like stone-throwing, arson, and other damage to vehicles and buildings.

    State-run Tasnim News Agency reported on August 3rd, 2018, that a group attacked a religious school in the district of Eshtehard in Alborz province. They threw stones and bricks through windows.

    On social media, reports and videos show the use of unnecessary and excessive force by security forces to disperse demonstrations. According to reports from journalists and human rights activists inside Iran, as well as independent news groups outside the country, security forces have detained scores of people in jails and secret detention facilities. Human rights lawyer Abdolfattah Soltani reported that he believes between 50 and 60 protesters who were arrested in Tehran had been taken to Evin prison since the start of the protests.

    Fifty women protesters have been taken to Shahr-e Rey prison in Varamin, outside Tehran, according to reports on social media. Shahr-e Rey prison (also known as Gharchak) holds several hundred women convicted of violent offenses in overcrowded and unhygienic conditions, allegedly without access to safe drinking water, decent food, medicine, or fresh air.

    Male protesters have reportedly been taken to Fashafouyeh prison in the south of Tehran following their arrests.

    Amnesty International is concerned by reports that the detainees who have been taken to Evin prison, Shahr-e Rey prison, and Fashafouyeh prison have been given little or no access to their families or lawyers. Amnesty International fears for the well being of Nader Afshari and other detainees.

    During the violently dispersed protests, dozens of people are said to have been injured. Videos of the protests shared on social media show crowds running from what sounds like gunfire. On one video, the voice of a bystander recording a protest in the city of Shiraz can be heard saying, “Plain-clothed security forces are beating the people.” 

    Reza Outadi, a 26-year-old protester, was killed in Karaj, north-west of Tehran, on August 3rd. The Prosecutor General of Karaj announced that he had been “killed by gunfire that came from protesters amidst the rioting that took place” in Karaj. He said that Reza Outadi was “shot in the back and killed”. He also claimed that a number of security forces personnel in Alborz province had been injured after being shot, stabbed, and hit with stones.

    Fars News reported on August 7th, that the Prosecutor General of Karaj announced that a special unit has been set up to investigate Reza Outadi’s death.

    Initially, authorities told the family that they considered Outadi to be a “rioter” (shooreshi) and consequently would not be releasing his body to them. They have since released his body, and his family were able to hold his funeral under heavy security presence, on August 6th.

    Amnesty International is concerned that the special unit that has been established to investigate the death of Reza Outadi does not meet the requirements of impartiality and independence under international law and standards. Amnesty urges the Iranian authorities to ensure that the investigation into the death of Reza Outadi is impartial and independent, and that anyone reasonably suspected of criminal responsibility be brought to justice in fair trials, and without recourse to the death penalty.

     

    Advertisements
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:26 am on 8 Mar 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Human Rights, , ,   

    Iranian Regime’s Abuse of Human Rights Must Be Addressed 

    At the end of last year, millions of people in Iran took to the streets to protest against the economic issues that were affecting all classes of society. The protests started in the city of Mashhad and spread across the country. They quickly turned into anti-government demonstrations and calls for “Death to Khamenei  and Death to Rouhani”. It was very clear that the people of Iran see regime change as the only way forward.

    As always, when the Iranian regime is faced with dissent and protests, there was a major crackdown. Thousands of people were arrested and scores of people were killed. This reaction from the regime is not surprising – it is the standard reaction that the people of Iran have experiences, and the world has witnessed, for decades.

    However, the international community failed to respond accordingly. And the Iranian regime has not been made to face the consequences of its unjust oppression and its violation of human rights.

    The people of Iran have not been dissuaded – not by the Iranian regime’s brutal reaction and not by the relative silence of many international leaders. They are strongly supported by each other in Iran and they have the backing of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), the main opposition to the regime.

    There are still protests going on across the country and young people were chanting the same slogans about regime change that were heard in January.

    It is important that the West reacts to the protests and to the regime’s brutal attempts at extinguishing them. Europe in particular must take action. It is taking about trade deals and normalized relations with Iran, but this must be postponed until Iran takes human rights seriously. The EU upholds the human rights of its citizens and it must ensure that it does not negotiate with a regime that disregards those of its own people.

    For as long as Europe remains silent, the Iranian regime will continue to ignore human rights. It has faced impunity for decades and the only way to put an end to this is for international leaders and organisations, as well as the European Parliament, to demand an international commission of inquiry into the human rights abuses. Silence is complicity.

    The regime is in a place of extreme desperation. It is under pressure from its own people, but also from the United States because of the 2015 nuclear deal. President Trump, who has made his feelings about Iran very clear, is threatening to pull the United States out of the deal if Europe does not fix the major flaws.

    The United States is keen to address Iran’s ballistic missile program and there is talk of further sanctions that will cripple the country.

    More pressure like this will likely push the regime over the edge. It cannot be allowed to continue its belligerent rampage across the Middle East and the people of Iran must have their human rights restored. Let’s not forget that the international community must uphold the rights of everyone.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:59 pm on 14 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Atena Daemi, Golrokh Iraee, Human Rights, , ,   

    Iranian Resistance Urgent Call to Save Two Lady Political Prisoners on 11th Day of Hunger Strike 

    Atena Daemi(L) and Golrokh Iraee

    The Iranian Resistance calls to save political prisoners, Atena Daemi and Golrokh Iraee, who are in dire situation due to 11 days of hunger strike. The NCRI calls on international human rights and women’s rights advocates to take urgent action to save the lives of the two political prisoners. The two young women are exposed to verbal abuse and harassment by prison authorities in addition to the effects of hunger strike.

    On January 24, Atena Daemi and Golrokh Iraee were unlawfully transferred from Evin Prison to Varamin’s Qarechak Prison in retaliation for supporting the January uprising, after being brutalized on fake charges and a fabricated new case.

    In Qarchak Prison, prisoners are deprived of the most basic needs of life, such as fresh air, drinking water, bathing facilities, minimum medical treatment and sleeping area. Political prisoners are at risk of developing hepatitis and other diseases due to the prison’s overcrowding by ordinary inmates who have dangerous contagious diseases.

    Ms. Daemi and Ms. Iraee have been on hunger strike since February 3, to protest violation of the principle of separation of prisoners’ categories and their unlawful exile to Qarchak Prison, aka Kahrizak II. They demand their own and another inmate, Soheil Arabi’s return to Evin Prison.

    Political prisoner Soheil Arabi, blogger and photographer, went on hunger strike on January 24 in protest to violent treatment of Atena Daemi and Golrokh Iraee, after which he was sent to exile to Greater Tehran’a Prison.

    Atena Daemi, 29, a human rights and child rights activist is sentenced to 7 years in prison on charges of “propaganda against the regime”, “collusion against national security”, and insulting Khamenei. Golrokh Iraee, 37, a human rights activist, is sentenced to six years in prison for “insulting the sanctities” and insulting Khamenei.

    Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran
    February 13, 2018

     
    • Sam 8:28 am on 15 Feb 2018 Permalink

      I hope you can add a subscription widget
      to your blog so when it’s publish people
      will be notified

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:08 am on 15 Feb 2018 Permalink

      Thanks Sam for comment, I have to say my blog has subscription widget, you can see it right side on the top of blog.

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:10 am on 15 Feb 2018 Permalink

      Also you can share each article with social media button on the down of the article.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 12:18 pm on 11 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Human Rights, ,   

    Human rights icon Asma Jahangir passes away in Lahore 

    Leading human rights lawyer, the UN Special Rapporteur on human rights in Iran, Ms. Asma Jahangir, passed away in Lahore on Sunday, February 11, 2018.

    Asma Jahangir, 66, was a human rights lawyer based in Pakistan and was Pakistan’s first woman to serve as the President of Supreme Court Bar Association of Pakistan.

    She was known for taking up court cases of victimized and marginalized sections of society and for her outspoken nature and unrelenting pursuit for human rights. She remained fearless in the face of any pressure and opposition and stood for what she believed in.

    Asma Jahangir was the first UN Rapporteur who included in her report the complaints of families regarding the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran. As she was presenting her report to the Human Rights Council, she was interrupted by a furious Syrian representative who assailed her at the behest of the Iranian regime. But she remained calm and firm and continued her report to the Council and was undeterred in pursuing her mandate.

    The worldhttps://twitter.com/4FreedominIran/status/962633466297896960 has lost a passionate champion of human rights and a staunch supporter of democracy. May her soul rest in peace.

    Jahangir was born in Lahore in January 1952.

    She received a Bachelors’ degree from Kinnaird College and an LLB from Punjab University. She was called to the Lahore High Court in 1980 and to the Supreme Court in 1982. She later went on to become the first woman to serve as president of the Supreme Court Bar Association.

    She became a pro-democracy activist and was jailed in 1983 for participating in the Movement for the Restoration of Democracy, which agitated against military dictator Ziaul Haq’s regime.

     

     

    She was also active in the 2007 Lawyers’ Movement, for which she was put under house arrest.

    Renowned lawyer and human rights activist Asma Jahangir

    Renowned lawyer and human rights activist Asma Jahangir

    She co-founded the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, and the Women’s Action Forum.

    She received several awards, including a Hilal-i-Imtiaz in 2010 and a Sitara-i-Imtiaz. She was also awarded a UNESCO/Bilbao Prize for the Promotion of a Culture of Human Rights and an Officier de la Légion d’honneur by France. She received the 2014 Right Livelihood Award and the 2010 Freedom Award.

    Asma Jahangir Calls on Iran Regime: Abolish Torture and Release Detainees

    UN Special Rapporteur Speaks on Dismal Human Rights Situation in Iran

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:33 am on 25 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Girl, Human Rights, , , Sarpol-e-Zahab,   

    Teenage girl becomes a national heroine 

    Haniyeh2

    In the ancient myths, the stereotype for a hero has always been a big, strong man. Recently, however, a story has been circulating in the internet about a frail, young girl who has been named a national hero.

    Haniyeh, 13, used to live in Sarpol-e Zahab, the epicenter of the earthquake that hit Kermanshah Province in western Iran on November 12, 2017.

    “We were at home that night when the earthquake struck,” says Haniyeh. “Our grandma was staying with us that night. We started to run but as I was running away, I suddenly remembered my little sister who was sleeping upstairs on the carpet. So, I ran back inside.”

    As soon as Haniyeh finds and grabs her sister, a steel bar falls from the roof and hits her back and the power goes off…

    “The next thing I remember is that my father came with his car and took us to hospital. My mother was taken to Tehran.”

    Haniyeh’s spine has been severed, but she says, “I do not regret what I did. I’d never wanted my little sister to be in my place.”

    Haniyeh is presently hospitalized in a Kermanshah hospital whose officials are recommending that she be taken to a convalescence home for the elderly.

    Had it been in some other country, Haniyeh would have received numerous awards and offered government aid to receive medical treatment and gain back her health. In Iran, however, the only help available for this young teenager is the elderly house.

    Is this her reward for a loving sister who jeopardized her own life and future opportunities to save her toddler sibling?

    One of the hospital nurses says if she receives a good treatment and physiotherapy there is a chance for her to gain back her health.

    Haniyeh is one out of hundreds of young little girls who have lost their homes and parents in the earthquake in Kermanshah. She is one out of thousands of little girls who are deprived of opportunities and are discriminated against all across Iran. The girl children who burned in Shinabad school, and those who died while taken on a tour by their school.

    Despite pervading injustices, Iran’s women and girls are the force for change and they are the ones who will realize equality and freedom for the whole nation.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:47 pm on 11 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Human Rights, , , ,   

    Amb. Kenneth Blackwell on Iran Human Rights, Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners. 

    In a panel on December 1, 2017 at the National Press Club by the Washington Office of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI-US), human rights experts called for accountability for Iranian regime’s human rights abuses. Referring to NCRI’s newly released book, “Iran, Where Mass Murderers Rule, The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities,” former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Kenneth Blackwell, called for accountability into the 1988 massacre to “put pressure on the regime to give access so that we might shine light on the evils that were done… [to give] hope to [those] inside Iran.” Blackwell added, “our delegation at the U.N. [should] continue to be a leading voice, not only on international terrorism…by the regime, but …to bring justice to a regime … that is a threat to the basic fabric of humanity across the globe.” Former Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, Linda Chavez, referred to the role of women in the opposition. “It is no accident,” that Iran’s opposition movement “is led by a woman, Madame Maryam Rajavi. She stands as a real affront to this regime. The regime hates and fears the MEK [Mujahedin-e Khalq] because in the MEK women … are allowed to lead others. And men are willing to listen and to follow them; a major threat to a regime that wants to imprison half its people.” NCRI’s U.S. Representative, Soona Samsami said, “why the regime continues to perpetrate such atrocities and continuing? The answer is simple; it fears its population. Despite harsh crackdown, Tehran has been unable to extinguish the Iranian people’s yearning for change, freedom, and human rights.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg emphasized, “The violation of human rights has become an inconvenient truth to those who have decided that the Iran nuclear agreement is what begins and ends our engagement with Iran… We need to begin holding Iran accountable.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain, Adam Ereli, said, “Many of the perpetrators of this crime are in positions of high authority and this has produced a culture of impunity that Iran’s rulers exploit to continue arresting, torturing, and murdering at will and without consequences or penalty… The only way to stop rogue regimes from using terror and murder as tools of their rule is to hold them accountable for their crimes.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:05 am on 10 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Human Rights, Large Rally in Paris,   

    Large Demonstration Against Violation of Human Rights in Iran- Paris 11 Dec. 2017 at 2 pm 

    11 Dec 2017-2pm Paris

    Join us in the great rally against violation of human rights in Iran. #NO2Rouhani

    Paris- at 14 CET – December 11, 2017

    Join us great rally in Paris 11Dec

    Large Demonstration Against Violation of Human Rights in Iran. All People of Iran Say: #No2Rouhani He is a murderer not a moderate!

    Online Campaign: 11 December 2017 – 2 pm- Paris

    11 Dec 2017-2pm Paris-2

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:59 am on 9 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Human Rights, ,   

    Congressman Tom Garrett discussing newly published Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    December 6, 2017–During a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing, Representative Tom Garrett of Virginia decried the atrocities committed by the current Iranian regime, whose creation he described as leading to “bloodshed on a scale not seen in that region for years.” Raising the recently released NCRI-US book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule, Garrett spoke on the 1988 massacre of political prisoners ordered by Ruhollah Khomeini. He emphasized that any radicalization of a religion that promotes intolerance should be vehemently opposed not only by the United States, but internationally as well.

    Representative Garrett condemning radical Islam while holding Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule.

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule is the latest book released by the NCRI-US office. It focuses on the 1988 massacre during which in a matter of months the Iranian regime systematically executed 30,000 political prisoners, mainly members of the main opposition movement, the People’s Mojahedin (MEK). The perpetrators of that massacre are currently in key positions of power in Iran, including the Justice Minister in Hassan Rouhani’s cabinet. For more information regarding the 1988 massacre, please explore the NCRI-US website which is ncrius dot org.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:12 pm on 8 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Annual Report 2017, , Human Rights, , ,   

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran 

    Annual-Report-2017-500x300

    By Masoud Dalvand

    Iran’s Human Rights Monitor has issued a comprehensive annual report of the shameful human rights situation under the rule of criminal mullahs. Referring to the report of Ms. Jahangir, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Iran, explains about the lack of an independent judiciary in Iran and numerous violations of the basic rights of the Iranian people and the suppression and increase of oppression in Iran.

    In this report, the latest criminality of the Iranian regime can be seen in the deliberate neglect of the state of the earthquake in the west of the country.

    Also, with regard to the right to life for humans, the increasing number of executions and arbitrary murders in Iran has been addressed.

    The report provides good information on the situation of Iranian prisons and prisoners in general, in particular political prisoners and women imprisoned, and the intensification of suppression and the very inhuman situation of detainees.

    Another part of the report describes the retaliation against human rights activists in Iran by the mullahs regime.

    Non-human punishments and punishments, such as flogging in public and amputations, are another part of this comprehensive report.

    floggings

    Violations of freedom of expression, the press, religious minorities and ethnic minorities are another part of this annual report.

    Baha'i

    Baha’is

    The violation of the economic, social and cultural rights of the Iranian people, such as workers and child laborers, has been described by the Iranian regime in this report.

    child laborers

    Video:

    You can read this comprehensive report on the link below:

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:48 am on 7 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Human Rights, ,   

    European Lawmakers Condemn Human Rights Violations in Iran, Express Support for Iranian Democratic Opposition 

    Maryam Rajavi's speech at the European Parliament on the eve of

    Press release by the Friends of a Free Iran inter-group at the European Parliament- Brussels- 6 December 2017 

    On Wednesday, 6 December 2017, on the initiative of the Friends of a Free Iran inter-group at the European Parliament, which enjoys the support of several hundred MEPs from various political groups, a conference on the occasion of the International Human Rights Day was held at the European Parliament in Brussels. The key note speaker was Maryam Rajavi, the President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI). Dozens of MEPs and a large number of parliamentary assistants, diplomats and journalists were present. The Scottish veteran politician Struan Stevenson was also one of the guest speakers.

    Gérard Deprez, Belgian MEP (ALDE) who chaired the conference said: “We call on the EU, especially the High Representative Mogherini to put human rights and women rights first when dealing with Iran. We are bitterly disappointed of her approach who is just obsessed and occupied with the nuclear deal or encouraging western companies to go to Iran. We urge her and also urge our European governments, including my own government in Belgium, to condition relations with Iran to a suspension of executions and a clear progress on human rights.”

    Maryam Rajavi said: “The regime has already exhausted its strategic resources. Economically, they are on the verge of bankruptcy. Socially, they have become ever more isolated. They failed in their strategy of destroying their main opposition and could not prevent the relocation of PMOI members out of Camp Liberty prison in Iraq.”

    Maryam Rajavi's speech at the European Parliament on the eve of

    Mrs Rajavi added that in such circumstances, the regime has two means of survival: more suppression and executions in Iran and stepping up its meddling abroad. This reflects the regime’s major internal crisis which it tries to cover up by expanding its influence in the region. Indeed, it seeks to put up a hollow show of force to discourage the international community from adopting a decisive policy against it.

    The regime’s leaders explicitly say Syria, Iraq and Yemen are the regime’s strategic depth and if they wrap up and leave those countries they would risk being overthrown. She reiterated, “As long as the international community fails to hold this regime accountable for its destructive behaviour, the mullahs will carry on with their dangerous adventures. The solution is showing firmness, not giving concessions. The EU has unfortunately abandoned its values in order to promote trade with the mullahs. It has turned a blind eye on the gross violations of human rights in Iran.”

    Ryszard Czarnecki, Vice-President of the European Parliament, said: “As long as executions continue in Iran, as long as freedom of speech is repressed in Iran, as long as religious minorities including Christians and Sunni Muslims are repressed in Iran, we cannot and we must not have a normal relation with this regime. Our informal group, Friends of a Free Iran, has always said that in our relations with Iran, Europe must put human rights first. We must not compromise on this.” He added: “The Iranian opposition is really feared by the Iranian regime which spends lot of energy and millions of euros against the democratic opposition under the leadership of Mrs Rajavi.”

    The members of European Parliament condemned the systematic human rights abuses in Iran, the regime’s ballistic missile projects and meddling and warmongering in the region. Many expressed support for Mrs Rajavi’s 10-point platform for a future Iran. The MEPs reiterated the following:

    1. Europe must not turn a blind eye to the widespread human rights violations in Iran. Trips to Tehran by European officials and MEPs are in practice to the benefit of the human rights violators in Iran.

    2. The regime’s record of executions, torture and murders over the past 38 years and in particular the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in 1988 must be referred to the United Nations Security Council, and the officials of the regime and those responsible for these crimes must be held accountable.

    3. All signs suggest that the Iranian regime is facing widespread crises. The Iranian people have shown through repeated protests that they seek regime change. It is high time for the European Union to side with the Iranian people in their legitimate desire to achieve democratic change. Recognizing the NCRI is essential for ending and compensating for the previous catastrophic policies. Experience has shown that this regime is unable to reform.

    4. The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) controls the main part of Iran’s economy. The IRGC has brought starvation and poverty to the Iranian people and it is responsible for the massacre of the peoples of Syria, Iraq and Yemen. All economic deals with the IRGC and its affiliated companies must be halted, and it must be blacklisted. It is vital to expel the IRGC and its mercenary militias from the region.

    The MEPs called on the EU High Representative to base any relations with Iran on an improvement of the human rights situation, halt to executions and an end to its meddling in neighbouring countries and its ballistic missile program; otherwise such relations would run counter to Europe’s values and to peace and stability in the region and the world.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: