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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:24 am on November 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Canada, Human Rights, , , Senator Linda Frum   

    Senator Linda Frum defies mullahs’ lobby, supports a #FreeIran 

    iranarabspring

    XOmZJARUFor 10 days, Conservative Canadian Senator Linda Frum has come under attack by the lobby of the Iranian regime in Canada for speaking in support of Bill S-219 (Non-nuclear Sanctions Against Iran Act) which targets the Iranian regime and its Revolutionary Guards for human rights abuses, including the 1988 massacre of political prisoners, and acts of international terrorism. Majid Jowhari, an Iranian-Canadian MP and a well-known apologist of the regime in Parliament (who both travels to Iran and attempts to invite the regime’s ‘lawmakers’ to Canada) and the Iranian Canadian Congress (the regime’s main lobby in Canada) carried out a coordinated campaign claiming she was speaking against the people of Iran — an extremely bogus charge given that she was demanding the regime be censured for carrying out human rights abuses against its people. Since the attacks on Senator Frum began, she has received overwhelming support, including on Twitter, by fellow Canadian…

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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:30 pm on November 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Human Rights, , , Iran earthquake,   

    Iran’s Devastating Earthquake Sparks Criticism of Regime’s Response 


    NCRI Staff

    NCRI — Recently, severe, random earthquakes have occurred across the globe. On Sunday evening a 7.3 Richter quake hit the Iran-Iraq border. Iran’s official IRNA news agency reports that at a minimum, 530 people were killed and more than 8,000 injured. Tens of thousands of homes and apartments were leveled.

    However, casualty statistics may be well beyond those reported by the media, according to Farhad Tajari, a member of Iran’s parliament from Ghasr Shireen, a town in western Iran that suffered enormous damage.

    Iran lies on several tectonic plates, and after an earthquake, the Iranian people suffer extreme conditions. In fact, 152 aftershocks continued to cause serious damage during the first 24 hours after the initial quake. 526 villages and 137,000 people in Iran’s Kermanshah province are facing grave danger.

    Sarpol Zahab is the most devastated town. It is located close to the Iraqi border. Authorities report that the quake has destroyed many buildings in this poverty stricken town.

    50% of the province’s schools have suffered serious damage according to reports, said the Head of the state Public Relations Office in Kermanshah.
    “My entire family of 20 people, including 15 kids, are all sitting in our cars,” Nosser in Sarpol Zahab told ILNA. “Our fuel is very low. They haven’t provided any tents or kerosene. We are freezing from the cold. There is no food.” YouTube reports from this town describe dire conditions.

    Although there are still no reports from many villages, many say that officials of the Iranian regime have failed to take proper actions.

    Heshmat Alavi a political and rights activist focusing on Iran and the Middle East writes in his article for Forbes, writes, “The reaction shown to each earthquake by the ruling regime in Iran is far different from its counterparts across the globe. Media censorship, excruciating delay in sending even minimum support and imposing a tight security atmosphere to quell any possible sign of unrest is Tehran’s response to such natural disasters.”

    Reports indicate that in another Iranian border town, Ghasr Shireen, the governor complained that tents had not been distributed to the earthquake victims. “The weather is not good and people need to sleep in tents because of the aftershocks. But I don’t know why there is no sign of the Red Crescent,” Akbar Akbari said.

    It is reported that approximately 90% of residential homes in the town of Thalath Baba Jani have suffered 50 to 100% destruction. There are 161 villages in this region, and close to 70% of the village homes have been destroyed, Akbari added.

    Hospitals in western Iran are said to be unable to provide care to the huge number of casualties, as well, there is a shortage of ambulances.

    Antonio Guterres, the United Nations Secretary-General, expressed his grief and urgently called for action to provide care for the earthquake victims.

    Maryam Rajavi, leader of the Iranian opposition, sent her condolences to her compatriots and asked the local youth, especially, to “rush to the aide of people in the quake-stricken areas and help those trapped under the wreckage.”

    Iran’s capital, Tehran, with a population of 15 million, is a prime target for devastating earthquake damage. The city “is only ten percent prepared for a possible earthquake,” according to remarks made by the Iranian regime’s own Crisis Management Organization chief. He added that more than 80% of the country is prone to natural disasters.

    The earthquake on Sunday reminded the region of another dangerous aspect of Iran’s controversial nuclear program.


    Originally published at http://www.ncr-iran.org.

     
    • bluemoone 9:33 am on November 15, 2017 Permalink

      So many people need help and their government could so easily help them but doesn’t. The UN could help but moving fast is not their thing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 9:35 am on November 15, 2017 Permalink

      Maybe USAR or INSARAG?

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 10:10 am on November 15, 2017 Permalink

      Exactly you’re right, unfortunately Iran regime is a brutal dictatorship that even in these events just try to crackdown of people , you know Iran regime doesn’t allow to foreign reporters to visit of region of earthquake because they fear of reaction of people… aid to people, is not delivering of aids through of this regime, but people must send their aids independently and directly to the people of the damaged of the earthquake.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 8:44 am on November 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Earthquake, Human Rights,   

    Iran: The Killer Quake in Iran-Iraq area has caused unknown casualties 

    A 7.3 earthquake rocked Iran-Iraq border area

    Iran, November 12, 2017 – At 9:48 pm local time Sunday, November 12, 2017, an earthquake measuring 7.3 on the Richter Scale hit Kermanshah in Iran

    Damage to the earthquake in the city of Ravansar in Kermanshah province

    Damage to the earthquake in the city of Ravansar in Kermanshah province

    Preliminary reports indicate that this earthquake was also felt in Hamedan, Arak, Zanjan, Ahwaz, Ilam, Sanandaj, Tabriz, Urumiah, Ardebil and many other cities in Iran. The quake was so strong that Ilam residents were frightened and run to the streets.

    The moment of earthquake in Ilam province

    The quake in Qasr-e Shirin caused electricity outage and forced people wondering around during the cold and rainy night.

    Video: Earthquake tonight in Urmia

    The quake was also felt as far as Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon and all the way to Greece.
    In Iraq, there has been a report of casualties. Some estimate that more than 250 people have been killed or injured. But the number could vary by the time.
    The epicenter has been reported about 20 km from the border city of Khaneqain.

     Video: Tabriz people gather in the streets after earthquake

    The earthquake in Kermanshah has disrupted mobile services and has cut off the electricity to most part of the city. Heavy traffic has been reported in and out of the city and there are reports of building damages around the city.

    CTV People gathered in the streets after the earthquake in Iranian Kurdistan Piranshar 

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:27 pm on October 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Human Rights, ,   

    Iran Arrests 17 people at mixed-gender party 

    mixed gender party

    In the early hours of morning on October 29, 2017, the Security forces raided a party in Gorgan, in province of Golestan, northern Iran and arrested six women and 11 men for attending a mixed party in a villa located in a village near the city.
    Arrests for mixed gender parties in Iran have occurred many times throughout the years. Within the last month alone, there have been at least four instances of raids at similar events.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:06 pm on October 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Human Rights, , , U.N. Special Rapporteur,   

    UN Special Rapporteur Speaks on Dismal Human Rights Situation in Iran 

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran addressed the Seventy-second session of the General Assembly in New York on October 25, to discuss the dismal situation of human rights in Iran that has been prevalent since the Regime took over in 1979.

    Asma Jahangir, who was addressing the General Assembly for the first time since taking the role in November 2016, delivered a report on the first six months of 2017 which was based on sources both inside and outside of Iran.

    Executions

    Jahangir explained that she was worried about the rate of executions in Iran, as well she should be. Currently, Iran has the highest execution rate per capita and is one of the few countries to still execute juvenile offenders, in clear violation of the UN’s Rights of the Child charter.

    She said: “I am concerned by the rate of executions in Iran. Reports indicate that since the beginning of the year 435 persons have been executed…At least four juvenile offenders were executed, and 86 more are known to be on death row, although the actual figure may be higher. I take the opportunity to reiterate my request for a list of all juvenile offenders on death row and reiterate my appeal to the Iranian authorities to urgently abolish the sentencing of children to death, and to engage in a comprehensive process of commutation of all death sentences issued against children, in line with juvenile justice standards.”

    Jahangir also expressed concern about the death sentence levied against spiritual leader Mohammad Ali Taheri for so-called corruption on earth- an exceptionally vague charge which the mullahs use when you haven’t actually committed a crime but they want to punish you anyway.

    Taheri’s trial is believed to have violated several international standards including due process and coercion of witnesses. As such, Jahangir called for his conviction to be overturned.

    She said: “I call for the immediate withdrawal of charges against Mr. Taheri and for his unconditional release, and the withdrawal of charges against all individuals held for peaceful exercise of freedom of expression, religion, or belief.”

    Cruel and Unusual Punishment

    Jahangir also raised the worrying issue of torture, corporal punishment, and the denial of medical care to coerce confessions and punish people, which violates human rights law and international standards of justice.

    She said: “I regretfully note that amputation, blinding, flogging, and the continued use of prolonged solitary confinement continues to be regularly practised. I am also deeply concerned by consistent reports of the denial of access to proper and necessary medical treatment of detainees, including the deprival of medical care as a form of punishment.”

    Many political prisoners have gone on hunger strikes to protest the dismal conditions they are being kept in and the Regime refuses to allow them access to sorely needed medical care.

    Prisoners of conscience

    While on the topic of political prisoners, it is important to discuss the routine detention of human rights defenders, journalists, religious minorities, ethnic minorities, and political campaigners for freedom of expression and peaceful activism.

    As of June 2017, no less than 26 journalists/bloggers had been arrested and/or sentenced for exercising press freedom. Many more had been harassed and/or intimidated by the Regime through interrogation, surveillance, amongst other things.

    Jahangir even spoke to those working at the BBC Persian Service who had been harassed by the Regime and told that if they continued working their relatives would be targeted and their assets would be frozen.

    She said: “They all sought private meetings for fear of the consequence of being identified as having provided information to my mandate.”

    Another worrying trend is that of the imprisonment of dual nationals, like UK charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who have been accused of spying for Western countries and sentenced to many years in jail.

    The 1988 Massacre

    This persecution of ordinary Iranians based on their political beliefs is not a recent phenomenon but is well ingrained in the Iranian Regime’s DNA.

    In 1988, the Regime slaughtered over 30,000 political prisoners in just a couple of months. They buried their bodies in mass graves, refused to tell the families what had happened, and attempted to hide their “crime against humanity” from the rest of the world.

    Despite recent acknowledgements of the genocide from the highest-ranking members of the Regime, the international community has still been largely silent and this silence must end.

    Jahangir said: “The families of the victims have a right to remedy, reparation, and the right to know about the truth of these events and the fate of the victims without risking reprisal. I therefore reiterate my call upon the Government to ensure that a thorough and independent investigation into these events is carried out.”

    Rights of Women

    As you can imagine, women in Iran are routinely oppressed by the Iranian Regime, whether its mandatory dress codes, banning women from attending sports matches, arresting people from reading and sharing feminist literature, excluding women from certain occupations, or many more misogynistic things.

    Jahangir said: “I call upon the Government to address these concerns in practice, and in legislation through ratifying the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and to repeal all laws and policies that discriminate against women and girls.”

    Jahangir paid tribute to the many human rights defenders who have risked their lives to speak to her about the situation in Iran.

    She said: “I have received ongoing and consistent reports of harassment, intimidation, and prosecutions of human rights defenders. For example, the well respected human rights defender, Narges Mohammadi, continues to be imprisoned simply because of her commitment to human rights. I am also deeply concerned by the reports of attacks on women human rights defenders in the form of judicial harassment, detention, and smear campaigns.”

    Even those living outside Iran fear reprisals from the Regime’s many terrorist proxy groups or that their family will be targeted by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

    What’s next for Iran?

    Jahangir expressed hope that the situation would improve through diplomatic action, but this does not seem likely.

    Iran regime’s President Hassan Rouhani made various promises during his campaign, which echoed promises that he made and did not follow through on after taking office in 2013. This so-called moderate has seen over 3,000 people executed during his four-year term and continues to see the Iranian people suppressed at the hands of the Regime.

    The only way to achieve human rights in Iran is through regime change by and for the people of Iran.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:04 pm on October 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Human Rights, , , , Norway,   

    Maryam Rajavi’s Message: To the Demonstration of Iranians in Oslo – Norway 

     

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – Maryam Rajavi: The demonstrations of Iranians abroad echo the voice of prisoners’ strikes and protests of workers, teachers and those plundered

    October 7, 2017. On the eve of the ‘World Day Against the Death Penalty,’ and in support of the Call for Justice Campaign, Iranians in Norway staged a demonstration In Oslo, the capital of Norway, Mrs. Maryam Rajavi the president elect of the Iranian resistance sent a message to this demonstration as follows:

    Fellow Iranians residing in Norway!

    Honorable personalities supporting the Iranian Resistance, and the dignified human beings who find defense of human rights, freedom and democracy in Iran as the requisite for ending war and terrorism in the Middle East. I hail all of you.

    I appreciate your demonstration in Oslo and your efforts to expand the campaign calling for justice for the victims of the 1988 massacre and the international campaign to confront violations of human rights in Iran.

    Your gathering is in line with the hunger strikes of political prisoners, the marches and protests of workers, teachers, students and those whose deposits have been plundered and complements them. All these activities have a single message and that is persistence on the desire of the people of Iran to overthrow the Velayat-e Faqih dictatorship.

    The incidents of the past year clearly prove that the efforts to mobilize our compatriots and to attract world attention to the clerical regime’s crimes have a great impact. After years, the issue of the massacre of political prisoners in 1988 has been brought up in an official document of the UN Human Rights Council.

    This is a great achievement and an important step, but it is not enough. The United Nations must set up a committee to investigate the 1988 massacre. The masterminds and perpetrators of this massacre, the executions in the 1980s and other crimes against the people of Iran must face justice.

    I also urge all parliaments to officially designate the 1988 massacre as a crime against humanity.
    Seeking justice for the victims of the massacre in 1988 is an important part of the struggle against violations of human rights in Iran which still continues in the form of daily executions, amputation of hands, and widespread arrests taking place every day to preserve the rule of repression. At least 3200 people have been executed under Rouhani. Another 5000 prisoners are on the death row.

    The regime relies on violations of human rights in Iran and suppression of protesters and freedom lovers to carry on with its belligerence and terrorism in the Middle East. If the regime had not been backed by the appeasement of Western governments, it would not have had a free hand in violating human rights. It would have not been able to extend its crimes to other countries, and it would have not been able to drench Syria in a whirlpool of blood.

    Therefore, I warn Western companies and governments, and particularly Norway, against dealing with the religious dictatorship ruling Iran.

    I hope that our fellow compatriots and Iranian freedom lovers in Norway could with their extensive campaigns attract the attention of the government and companies of Norway to the fact that any dealing and commercial engagement with the Iranian regime assists the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and reinforces its suppression of the people of Iran and belligerence in the Middle East.

    Iran’s ruling mullahs are at war with the people of Iran and the region. We urge Western governments to refrain from aiding the regime in this war through their deals. We urge them to make every engagement with the Iranian regime contingent on end to torture and executions.

    Dear compatriots, I would like to once again appreciate your efforts.
    Your campaign conveys the voice of the oppressed people of Iran to the world. This campaign has more impact today than any other time and is an important help to the Iranian Resistance for the overthrow of the clerical regime and establishment of freedom and democracy in Iran.

    I wish you every success.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:10 am on October 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ahwaz, Human Rights, ,   

    Iran: Shocking video of Iranian guards beating and forcing detainees to bark like dogs 

    A shocking video showing Iranian security forces beating and humiliating their Arab detainees.

    A shocking video showing Iranian security forces beating and humiliating their Arab detainees.

    IRAN, Ahwaz,  A video shared on social media showed Iranian regime suppressive security forces viciously beating and humiliating blindfolded Ahwazi Arab activists forcing them to bark like dogs.

    A masked security officer starts to beat them up by punching them using martial art techniques. He can also be heard calling them names.
    Iranian and Ahwazi Arab activists condemned the torture, which violates civil and international laws and called for punishing the perpetrators.

    The video’s time and place remains unclear but Ahwazi Arab activists said on social media that this video dates back to when Iranian security forces arrested Ahwazi Arabs on August 31 before Eid al-Adha

     

    Source: Iran: Shocking video of Iranian guards beating and forcing detainees to bark like dogs

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:44 am on October 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Human Rights, , , ,   

    Ignoring Iran’s crimes against humanity bolsters ayatollahs 

    By Soona Samsami

    For 40 days, 22 political prisoners staged a hunger strike in Gohardasht Prison in Karaj, 30 miles west of the Iranian capital of Tehran. Most are serving sentences for dubious political charges. In dire circumstances, they were only demanding their return back to bad conditions.

    Their health deteriorated; international intervention was literally non-existent, limited to a few expressions of concern, but no practical measures to compel the Iranian regime to stop its inhumane treatment of prisoners of conscience.

    Amnesty International’s Deputy Middle East and North Africa Director Magdalena Mughrabi said the protest “highlighted the urgent need for reforms to Iran’s cruel prison system.”

    In other words, the situation in Gohardasht reflected the much larger human rights crisis perpetuated by Iran’s clerical regime.

    There is an underlying need to use this situation, and the many others like it, as a jumping-off point to call international attention to the horror of conditions in which Iranian citizens might find themselves confined for years without ever having committing anything that the world would recognize as a crime.

    In addition, there’s a need to expose a past record of atrocities shocking in its horror and in the lack of international attention to it.

    This year’s United Nations General Assembly convened recently, and as in years past, was addressed by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. To no one’s surprise, Rouhani again portrayed criticism of Iran’s human rights record, including this year’s report by the U.N. special rapporteur on human rights in Iran, Asma Jahangir, as a Western conspiracy to discredit the Islamic theocracy.

    Meanwhile, Iranian citizens and human rights activists are increasingly calling for the perpetrators of massacres, past and present, to be brought to justice. Social media has become increasingly effective at circumventing the regime’s restrictions on free expression, but people are still routinely charged with crimes, even capital crimes, on the basis of something an intelligence agent found them saying on a banned platform like Facebook or Twitter.

    As Rouhani addressed the nations of the world, many U.N. delegates had prepared for his diatribe by reading an article published that same morning by the Wall Street Journal.

    Written by a young Iranian political activist and former political prisoner, the piece decried the regime’s efforts “to force Iranians to forget 1988,” the “summer of blood,” when  approximately 30,000 political prisoners, primarily activists of the main Iranian opposition movement, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI or MEK), were massacred in just a few months.

    They were condemned to death after “trials” lasting only a few minutes for dissent against the theocratic regime. As the young activist plaintively pointed out, “How could their families possibly forget?”

    The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), among others, has repeatedly called for an international inquiry, as the first step toward bringing charges against the key players for crimes against humanity.

    Some 30 years later, Secretary General Antonio Guterres appended a note to the special rapporteur’s report:

    “The families of the victims have a right to know the truth about these events and the fate of their loved ones without risking reprisal. They have the right to a remedy, which includes the right to an effective investigation of the facts and public disclosure of the truth; and the right to reparation,” he stated.

    Both U.N. officials acknowledged the 1988 massacre and subsequent “global denial” of it, but neither the secretary general, special rapporteur, nor any leading international official has yet to do anything practical to actually address that injustice or compensate for past neglect.

    As the United Nations Third Committee drafts its new resolution censuring human rights abuses in Iran, it should include a paragraph calling for the formation of an independent commission of inquiry into the 1988 massacre, with the aim of bringing the perpetrators to justice.

    The Iranian regime must not have a sense of impunity as it proceeds with its current crackdown on Iranian society, specifically in the prisons. If the world does not respond with one voice, that sense of impunity will only grow.

    Tehran must expect consequences for its ongoing crimes, fear consequences for future crimes and face consequences for crimes gone unpunished. Otherwise, the international community must share the stain of the blood on the hands of Tehran’s rulers.

    This is the message thousands of Iranians delivered to the United Nations during the Free Iran rally in protest to Rouhani’s presence on Sept. 20. It is the message Iran’s youth sends each day with their courageous defiance on social media. It is a message that deserves a response.

    Soona Soona Samsami is the representative in the United States for the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), which is dedicated to the establishment of a democratic, secular and non-nuclear republic in Iran.

    Source: Ignoring Iran’s crimes against humanity bolsters ayatollahs

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 3:03 pm on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Human Rights, , ,   

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence. 

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence.
    The Coroner’s Office of Tehran, capital of Iran, declared that it has registered the names of 12,159 women as victims of violence in four months.
    The public relations of the General Department of the Coroner’s Office of Tehran Province announced that in the four months since the beginning of the Persian New Year (March 21, 2017) until July 21, 2017, it has registered the names of 33,362 people, 12,159 of them women, who had referred to the forensic centers of Tehran province due to injuries they suffered in physical fights. (The state-run Mehr news agency – September 23, 2017)

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/iran-women-news/4327-iran-over-12-000-women-registered-as-victims-of-violence

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:58 am on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Human Rights, ,   

    Asma Jahangir Calls on Iran Regime: Abolish Torture and Release Detainees 

    NCRI StaffAsma Jahangir, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran, was interviewed by Al Arabiya’s studios in the United Nations about the current situation in the country. She said that in many areas in the country there are serious violations of human rights – from rule of law, denial of due process, discriminatory laws, people being discriminated against on religious and ethnic grounds and torture. She said that she believes the Iranian government is beginning to look into these violations, however the steps being taken to address then are “very tiny”. The government knows that there are issues that need to be addressed, but she emphasised that it cannot continue to let them drag on because awareness is rising across the world. Jahangir pointed out that the charter of human rights in Iran exists, but the interviewer emphasised that it does not include women and people of ethnic and religious minorities and that the charter is non-binding. Jahangir said that the charter is “a promise” that the government will write policies so that the rights are implemented. She said it is here that the government is taking small steps. With regards to protesters in Iran that are partaking in activist activities so that the situation will improve, Jahangir said that she will not discourage them from speaking up, despite the fact that they risk detention and torture. She reminded them that it is the right of every citizen in the world to speak up for their rights and against incidents where rights are violated. She said that it is important that the activists build tighter networks with human rights organisations, with journalists, with employers, and so on, because they will get security from each other and will be able to devise better and more effective ways to challenge any actions that take away their rights. In her latest report, Jahangir called on the Iranian government to abolish torture and to release detainees as well as a number of other recommendations, but she is unsure that they will be honoured. She pointed out that there must be no tolerance for human rights violations against people who simply want to have their rights asserted or people who fight for the rights of others. Speaking about the 53 political prisoners that were transferred to another wing in the prison in July this year who started a hunger strike to protest their treatment, Jahangir said that the government does not class them as political detainees. She, however, highlights that they are in fact human rights defenders and said the UN has sent urgent appeals. She said that the Iranian government needs to act because it accountable to the Human Rights Council.

     
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