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  • Masoud Dalvand 3:40 pm on 15 Jul 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , , , ,   

    Conference, “1988 Massacre in Iran, Perpetrators must be TRIED” 

    Litigation for the 1988 Massacre Political Prisoners. Trial of Perpetrators of Massacre.

    Iran’s regime executed some 30,000 political prisoners in the 1988 Massacre. We will urge the world community to hold the perpetrators accountable.

    At the Call-for-Justice for #1988Massacre Conference demanding prosecution of its perpetrators and masterminds at an international court – Ashraf 3.

    The massacre of political prisoners was a blood-drenched encounter between the Middle Ages and a generation which created the 1979 revolution, a generation resolved to achieve a society based on freedom & equality, but encountered the monster of religious fascism.

    The 1988 Massacre was the horrifying scene of such historic confrontation, but it was not the end. It was the beginning a new confrontation which still continues and will write the fate of the Iranian nation in freedom.

    You can see the conference at the links below:

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    • wizzymedpower 8:06 pm on 15 Jul 2019 Permalink

      God with His infinite mercy and grace will vindicate the Nation of Iran in Jesus name amen!

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 7:59 pm on 19 Mar 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , , ,   

    The EU Needs a Better Policy on Iran 

    Written by Staff Writer (https://www.ncr-iran.org)on 19 March 2019.

    The US has adopted a “maximum pressure” campaign toward the Iranian Regime since pulling out of the malign nuclear deal last year, reinstating economic sanctions and encouraging diplomatic isolation.

    By comparison, the European Union’s policy is largely undefined and they still seem eager to appease Iran, even if they are willing to confront the mullahs occasionally on isolated incidents.

    While many hope that the EU will move more in the direction of the US, especially following recent sanctions levied against some members of the Regime, they currently follow an appeasement-at-all-costs policy because they have not yet reached a consensus about what they should be asking Iran for.

    However, the key to understanding Iran is to recognise and reject Iran’s propaganda, which is there solely to present Iran as a normal country that is capable of internal moderation.

    This has previously led the West to embrace so-called moderates, like President Hassan Rouhani, despite the fact that there are no moderates in the Iranian Regime. After all, would a moderate appoint Mostafa Pourmohammadi as Justice Minister, despite knowing about his role in sending thousands to the deaths in the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners? Pourmohammadi, who claimed to be “proud” of his role in the massacre, was replaced in 2017 by Alireza Avaie, another man who served on the death committees only in a different city.

    This was compounded last week by the confirmation of Ebrahim Raisi, who served alongside Pourmohammadi on the Tehran death committee, as head of the judiciary. While Rouhani did not appoint Raisi because the Supreme Leader selects judiciary chiefs, this signifies that there is no real difference between Rouhani and Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, which is what the US and the Iranian opposition have been saying.

    In fact, the Iranian Resistance has been leading an uprising against the Regime, in spite of a violent crackdown that saw 50 killed and 8,000 arrested, which calls for regime change.

    Alejo Vidal-Quadras, former vice-president of the European Parliament and current president of the Brussels-based International Committee in Search of Justice (ISJ), wrote
    “There is far more consistency in these protests than there is in European policy toward Iran. Overwhelmingly, the Iranian people are calling for regime change because they know exactly what to expect from the ruling theocracy: endless repression and a constant state of animosity toward the international community. If the nations of Europe would only come to understand that there is no “moderate” alternative to this policy within the existing regime, they would surely begin to realize that their support could help the Iranian people achieve the freedom and democratic governance for which they are so willing to risk their lives.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:00 am on 4 Mar 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , ,   

    Another look at crimes against humanity by the mullahs regime in Iran; The 1988 Massacre. 


    Over 30,000 political prisoners were sent to the gallows by the mullahs’ regime in Iran during the summer 1988 massacre

    Masoud Dalvand(Freedom Star):

    After 30 years of the terrible massacres of Iranian political prisoners in 1988, the extent of this catastrophe and the great crime against humanity has not yet been fully revealed. In this terrible massacre of more than 30,000 political prisoners, most of them were members and supporters of the PMOI/MEK, they were executed in a short time for being guilty of loyalty to their beliefs, ruthlessly by the mullahs regime and based on an anti-human fatwa of Khomeini.

    It is imperative that all human rights defenders in the world and all opponents of executions join the movement seeking justice for victims of the #1988Massacre, to bring the perpetrators of this great crime to justice. The executions of that massacre still in Iran are at the head of the highest government and judicial authorities and have not yet been accounted for by their crimes.

    In the highly informative article published on the website of the PMOI, it once again focuses on other dimensions of this major anti-human crime.

    I invite you to read this article.

    Iran: Senior regime insider acknowledges 1988 massacre

    Iran, March 4, 2019 – Mostafa Pourmohammadi, former judiciary minister in the cabinet of Hassan Rouhani, President of the mullahs’ regime in Iran, has acknowledged his crimes during the horrendous summer 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners. The majority of the victims sent to the gallows during in this crime against humanity were members and supporters of the Iranian opposition People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK). Pourmohammadi was a member of the notorious “Death Commission” that sent the political prisoners to their deaths.

    “This is an active case. This dossier is now very much alive and the enemy has invested on this issue. And now, discussing this matter would be playing into the enemy’s hands. That is why I haven’t talked about this subject. I don’t know when it would be proper to talk about this matter… and unfortunately, the publication of that tape was literally an act of treason,” Pourmohammadi said in a state TV interview on Friday night. He was referring to the publication of a tape of remarks made back in 1988 by Grand Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri, the then successor of regime founder Ruhollah Khomeini, who criticized the regime’s genocide in prisons throughout the country.

    “… it was a betrayal to the revolution and [Khomeini], and even to Mr. Montazeri. Mr. Montazeri made remarks, good or bad, wrong or whatever. He made a decision. That meeting and the publication of those remarks led to Mr. Montazeri’s sacking. When people make stupid decisions, seeking to take revenge, they become blind, and can no longer determine what is right or wrong,” he added.

    “Well, I defended [Khomeini’s] move. We had a mission in regards to the [PMOI/MEK], back when I was the Revolutionary Court prosecutor. I issued many indictments against the [PMOI/MEK] and sent it to the court. Many of them were condemned, many were executed and many other verdicts,” Pourmohammadi continued.

    “Some of the men and others, and reporters, have sought to ask me questions. I have answered that I do not play into the enemy’s hands. Unfortunately, one of the unwise insiders was provoked for an unknown reason and published that tape. There’s no reason that we should be deceived by the enemy’s plans. We should play into their hands. We have much to say and we will say so when the time comes.”

    Read more about the 1988 massacre:

    More than 30 years ago have gone since the horrific and brutal massacre of political prisoners that was carried out in just one short summer by the criminal mullahs ruling Iran. 
    In the summer of 1988, the clerical regime summarily and extra-judicially executed about 30,000 political prisoners held in jails across the country. This heinous massacre was carried out upon a fatwa by the Islamic regime founder, Ruhollah Khomeini.
    There are strong indications that Khomeini’s fatwa was issued on July 26, 1988.
    The Iranian regime has never acknowledged these executions, or provided any information as to how so many prisoners were killed in a matter of just a few months.
    The majority of those executed were either serving prison sentences for their political activities or had already finished their sentences but their time in jail was extended.

    https://image.mojahedin.org/images/2016/2016811341378064578951.jpg

    Some of them had previously been imprisoned and released, but were re-arrested and executed as part of this heinous massacre.
    The wave of executions of political prisoners began in late July and continued unabated for several months.
    By the time it ended in the early autumn of 1988, some 30,000 political prisoners, the overwhelming majority activists of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI or MEK), were slaughtered.

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    A site of a mass grave for some of the victims of the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran

    The events that led to this incomprehensible and unseen brutality

    From 1981 to 1987 – Thousands and thousands of Iranian activists, mainly youth, were arrested and tortured for opposing the regime’s brutal grip on power and for supporting the People’s Mojahedin of Iran (PMOI, MEK). Interrogators threw political prisoners on torture benches, tearing them apart to destroy their wills and hearts. Young girls and boys were indiscriminately tortured and executed with no mercy. Women and men were beaten to death. Virgin girls were raped the night before their execution to supposedly prevent them from going to the heavens. Mothers were tortured in front of their children or children in front of their mothers to break their will. Wives were raped in front of their husbands, sisters in front of their brothers. They had to choose between repenting or suffering the doomed destiny.

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    Paving the way for the unholy massacre

    In the final phases of the Iran-Iraq war, Khomeini who felt that defeat was imminent, decided to take his revenge on the political prisoners. Most of the prisoners from that period of time who lived through to tell their ordeal, know that the regime was preparing all along for an extensive massacre from the onset and the first step of this diabolical scheme begun in the fall and winter of 1987.
    The regime started to sort and separate prisoners all over the country. The only thing that distinguished the prisoners was their political affiliation, whether they had repented and denounced the MEK, or they showed commitment to the only Nationwide Resistance against the mullahs, the MEK. Khomeini issued fatwas (religious decrees) ordering the execution of anyone who had not “repented” and who was not willing to collaborate entirely with the regime.
    Many memories of those who survived that horrific ordeal and are alive now are as vivid as black and white. In one instance, according to one survival, it was in the afternoon of a March day in 1988 that Majid Sarlak, an interrogator and torturer in the notorious Evin Prison, barged in to the women’s ward looking anguished and carrying bunch of forms and applications. He told the prisoners that “the sentence for those who continue their pledge to ‘Mojafeghin’ (the regime’s derogatory term to describe the PMOI/MEK) is execution. “You have lived too long”, he shouted “and now the time has come to take care of you.”

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    The executions started from Evin Prison, because almost all those with death sentences were kept in Evin and most of the life sentences were in another horrifying prison, called Gohardasht. Among those who were transferred from Gohardasht to Evin, were many that had already finished their sentence and were kept in prison extra time. But this didn’t end in Evin, and soon included other prisons, i.e. Gohardasht, Qezelhesar and other prison in the entire country.

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    Evin Prison in Tehran

    Mass executions of prisoners in 1988 begins with Khomeini’s death decree

    The massacres began, and everyday hundreds of political prisoners were sent to the gallows and their corpses buried hastily in mass graves all around the country, particularly in the capital Tehran.
    Khomeini decreed: “Whoever at any stage continues to pledge legions to the [Mojahedin] must be executed. Annihilate the enemies of Islam immediately.” He went on to add: “… Those who are in prisons throughout the country and remain steadfast in their support for the MEK/PMOI are waging war on God and are condemned to execution… It is naive to show mercy to those who wage war on God.”

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    Khomeini’s “Death Decree” for mass executions of Iranian political prisoners in 1988

    But in other cities and towns around the country, the regime was faced with difficulties in mass executing prisoners. Unlike Tehran which is a large city and things happen normally without much notice, other cities are relatively smaller and if the regime had begun mass killings, people would soon notice and would spark unrest and even uprising. So the evil clerical regime started to move prisoners from smaller towns and cities to the capital and some to faraway destinations to avoid unrest. Therefore, prisoners were moved in hundreds to Gohardasht, Evin and other prisons. 
    Parviz Mojahednia, a young male prisoner who was arrested while still a teenager, called his mother before being transfered to Tehran telling her that “They are moving us out of here to be executed soon.”

    https://image.mojahedin.org/images/2016/2016811341378064578957.jpg

    One report revealed that a few days after July 18, 1988 seize-fire of the Iran-Iraq war, a number of young female political prisoners including, Farah Eslami, Hakimeh Rizvandi, Marzieh Rahmati, Nasrin Rajabi and Josumeh Heidari were removed from Ilam prison, in western Iran, to the city of Saleh-Abad under the pretext of the previous prison being unsafe for them. But they were executed the following day, of course after they were raped.

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    Farah Eslami, Marzieh Rahmati and Josumeh Heidari

    “Death Commission” of 1988 massacre of political prisoners

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    Main members of the death commission

    Khomeini assigned an “Amnesty Commission” for prisons. In reality it was a “Death Commission” comprised of the three individuals: A representative of the Ministry of Intelligence, a religious judge and a prosecutor. The final decision rested with the Intelligence Ministry official. They held a trial for a few minutes that resembled more of an interrogation session. The questions were focused on whether the inmate continued to have any allegiances to the PMOI (MEK). The PMOI prisoners made up of more than 90 percent of those taken before the “Death Commission.” If the prisoners were not willing to collaborate totally with the regime against the PMOI, it was viewed as a sign of sympathy to the organization and the sentence was immediate execution. The task of the Death Commission was to determine whether a prisoner was a so-called “Enemy of God” or not. In the case of Mojahedin prisoners, that determination was often made after only a single question about their party affiliation. Those who said “Mojahedin” rather than the derogatory “Monafeqin” were sent to be hanged.

    https://image.mojahedin.org/images/2016/2016811341378064578960.jpg

    Iranian officials who were involved in the massacre of Pol. Prisoners

    Khomeini’s successor protested the wildly rush of executions of prisoners in 1988 massacre

    The haste to execute was so abhorrent that some of Khomeini’s closest confidantes, most notably, Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri, Khomeini’s successor, had doubts and protested it. In letters to Khomeini, Montazeri urged for some leniency and slowing down. But Khomeini ordered there should be no mercy to anyone, including teenagers. He said pregnant women should not be spared or have the chance to give birth to their child and should be executed immediately.
    In December 2000, Montazeri published his memoirs. The book revealed shocking documents on the atrocities committed by the clerical regime, none as horrendous as the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in 1988 on the strict orders of Khomeini.
    Montazeri’s book was not the first document informing the world of this massacre. News of the carnage had already begun to trickle through the iron curtain of censorship imposed by the mullahs to ensure a complete blackout on their crime.

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    Text of Montazeri’s letter to Khomeini on July 31, 1988, complaining that mass execution of Mojahedin (PMOI/MEK) prisoners would only embolden them and enhance their legitimacy and popularity appeal.

    Khomeini required total conformity from the regime’s officials


    All officials of the regime at the time had to conform fully to this massacre or they would be sacked or deposed. Ayatollah Montazeri, who protested the massacre, fell from grace and was sacked by Khomeini in March 1989. Montzaeri’s memoirs in December 2000 and its shocking enclosures exposed the horrendous scale of the massacre. What gave weight to the revelations is that they were made by a man who was at the time of the executions the officially ordained successor to Khomeini and the second highest authority in Iran. Yet, when it came to massacring political prisoners, Khomeini showed no mercy to the slightest nonconformity even by his own successor, Ayatollah Montazeri.

    https://image.mojahedin.org/images/2016/2016811341378064578962.jpg

    Untold stories of the massacre revealed by witnesses

    “Prison officials called a woman in the city of Zanjan, northwestern Iran and told her that your son has been freed, come and take him. The woman was so happy and jubilant that called her neighbors and friends, barrowed a car and decorated it with flowers and pictures of his son. She wore her finest dresses and gathered everybody and prepared a homecoming party for her dear son to come home. She went to the prison where she was told to go to pick up her son. But in a bitter and horrific shock, saw a bag of clothing belonging to her son and an address where the boy was buried. When she went back home where the family and friends were impatiently waiting to see the freed man, the homecoming turned to mourning. It is said that the woman never laughed again and kept crying in silence.”

    https://image.mojahedin.org/images/2016/2016811341378064578963.jpg

    Another story reveals of a young man who was arrested under an assumed name. He never revealed his true identity. This young man’s name was Mortaza Tajic. He spent 7 years in prisons under the assumed name and his parents were never able to find him. His father did everything to get a lead as to his whereabouts. In 1986 he openly created a scene to be arrested and sent to the prison so he could find out about his son from inside the prison. But was never able to identify him. Finally in 1988 Mortaza was executed under that assumed name of Mojtaba Hashem-Khani, and his body was buried in a mass grave never identified by his parents.

    https://image.mojahedin.org/images/2016/2016811341378064578964.jpg

    Some prisoners i.e. Taibah Khosrow-abadi, Tahmineh Sotoodeh and Mohsen Mohammad-Bagher were congenitally paralyzed. Shahin Panahi, another young female prisoner had lost a limb. Leila Dashti had brain tumor and was scheduled to be operated on soon. Ashraf Ahmadi, Soosan Salehi and Gholam-reza Mashhadi-Ebrahi had heart disease. But they all were executed despite their disabilities. There were dozens of others like them in the prison which were sent to the gallows.

    https://image.mojahedin.org/images/2016/2016811341378064578965.jpg

    Many students who were taken from their high-school benches to prisons, were finally executed after 7 years of imprisonment. Lives were destroyed, families were torn apart and mothers died after they heard of their loved ones’ executions. 
    Now after 28 years, many families are still searching for peace of mind.

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    Families of executed pol. prisoners in Iran

    From July 27, 1988 to August 16, some 200 prisoners, mainly from Mojahedin, were executed daily. The executions were carried out entirely confidential and without any official announcements. Even the guards were not allowed to contact their families, in order to prevent any leak of the news to the public. But this criminal act did not stay silent and broke out of prison barriers and walls. 
    In a telegram to the then UN Secretary General, Mr. Masoud Rajavi, the leader of Resistance unveiled the horrific extent of the massacres and told the Secretary General of the 860 corpses that were buried in mass graves in Tehran’s cemetery, Behesht-e Zahra, two weeks earlier. A wave of international protests and campaigns were kicked off to condemn these atrocities by the Iranian mullahs’ regime. The efforts by the supporters of the PMOI under the leadership of Mr. Masoud Rajavi, and continued protests and demonstrations throughout the world forced the criminal regime to halt the wave of executions in late September, but continued public hanging until the end of that year. Public executions were carried out under the pretext of robbery, smuggling and being bandits, to cover up the real intention of the regime which was to eliminate any dissent. In Tabriz in the winter of 1988 political prisoners were hanged in the city’s public squares and often kept on the noose for more than 24 hours to intimidate the public.

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     Public and international campaign protests around the world condemning the heinous massacre

    To date, there are only a little information about the extent of the massacre, especially in cities, including Isfahan, Shiraz, Rasht, Tabriz, Ardebil, Mashhad, Ahwaz, Abadan, Zahedan, Kerman and other major cities. And information in to the massacre in some other cities are about zero. In some prisons, every one of the prisoners were executed and no one survived to tell the tails of brutality against hundreds of innocent lives. 
    Undoubtedly, while the dagger of hate and fundamentalism is still in the hearts of a nation, unveiling the true stories and the depth of criminality is almost impossible. But that day will eventually come when writers and historians would talk about what went on in the dark dungeons of Khomeini and what a heavy price this nation paid to keep alive the hope of freedom and human dignity. 

    Role of Hassan Rouhani in 1988 massacre of political prisoners

    Hassan Rouhani was Deputy Commander-in-chief of the regime’s armed forces at the time. Furthermore, since 1982 he was a member of the regime’s Supreme Defense Council and a member of the Central Council of the War Logistics Headquarters.
    In those positions, he was fully cognizant of this hideous crime and obviously was in full conformity. 
    This shows that the notion that Rouhani is a “moderate” and “reform minded” is absolutely preposterous and baseless. Actually he, like all other senior officials of the regime, is a culprit of this hideous crime.

    International assessment

    There has been little international attention to this crime against humanity.In 2008, twenty years after the massacre Amnesty International “renewed its call for those responsible for the ‘prison massacre’ to be held accountable. There should be no impunity for such gross human rights violations, regardless of when they were committed.” Amnesty added: “Those responsible for the killings – one of the worst abuses to be committed in Iran – should be prosecuted and tried before a regularly and legally constituted court and with all necessary procedural guarantees, in accordance with international fair trial standards.”

    Justice not yet served

    The massacre of 1988 remains to be one of the darkest stains on the recent history of mankind, as one of the least exposed and discussed.
    Some human rights experts have described it as the greatest crime against humanity in the 20th Century following World War II that has gone unpunished.
    It is the darkest irony of this very dark episode, that of all its human rights violations the Iranian regime has been most successful at keeping the 1988 killings a secret from the international community and even from many Iranians. By now, virtually everyone knows of the reign of terror that immediately followed the Islamic Revolution, the Iranian government’s assassination campaign abroad, and the “Chain Murders” that targeted opposition intellectuals and activists in the late 1990s. Tragically, however, there is very little public awareness of the 1988 executions.
    Not only has there been no prosecution of the criminals who orchestrated and carried out that summer’s gruesome murders, but the regime continues to deny that they even occurred.
    The Iranian regime continues to deny the 1988 elimination of opposition prisoners. None of the perpetrators or masterminds have been brought to justice and none of the regime’s senior officials including the current Supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, have been held accountable.
    The pervasive silence of the past 28 years should be shattered. The UN should launch an independent investigation into one of the most hideous crimes against humanity after the Second World War.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:24 pm on 28 Dec 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , , ,   

    Action Needed on Amnesty International’s Iran Report 

    Action-Needed-on-Amnesty-Internationals-Iran-Report

    By: RezaShafiee

    After 30 years, Amnesty International published a 200-page comprehensive report on the massacre of political prisoners in Iran. Its main focus is the dark days of the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran. Had the 1988 massacre been given enough international attention it deserved back then, the Iranian people would not have faced unbridled human rights abuses the following years. Impunity for crimes in those days emboldened the regime over the years to the extent that it is leveling the graves of the same victims all over Iran.

    The report concludes that only when “The UN establishes an independent, impartial and effective international mechanism to help bring those responsible for these abhorrent crimes to justice,” the “Blood soaked” history of the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran will be put to rest. The human rights watchdog also says that such crimes amount to crimes against humanity and the perpetrators should be hauled before the international criminal court.

    Massacre of political prisoners in 1988

    There are different accounts of the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran because of the shroud of secrecy the Iranian regime’s officials wrapped around it. Many former and current top Regime officials flatly deny gruesome events of that summer.

    What really happened?

    In the summer of 1988, Khomeini’s ambiguous war with its neighbor Iraq came to a screeching halt when his top brass Revolutionary Guards commanders foresaw a crushing and imminent defeat if he did not stop the war soon. War with Iraq served as a cover for internal suppression. At home, Khomeini had a powerful opposition and he needed to get rid of the existential threat to his absolute rule, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK). He saw thousands of political prisoners as a potential asset for the opposition.

    Khomeini hastily put together a committee to exterminate the prisoners. It, of course, needed some kind of religious green light. His infamous handwritten fatwa did the trick. The “Death Commission,” as it is known among Iranian political prisoners, was born to set in motion one of the most heinous crimes against humanity the world had seen in the 20th century. The commission oversaw the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in the summer of 1988, mostly members and supporters of MEK.

    On the eve of 28th anniversary of the 1988 massacre in the summer of 2016, Maryam Rajavi, President of the National Council of Resistance of Iran, the (NCRI) tasked the members of the opposition to embark on a worldwide campaign called “Movement for Justice.” The campaign sought justice for fallen victims of the theocratic regime in 1988. The final goal is to get the UN Security Council to hold the Iranian officials, past and present, accountable for 1988 crimes and stand trial before an international court for crimes against humanity.

    An early whistleblower

    Ayatollah Hossein-Ali Montazeri was the first whistleblower of the 1988 massacre in Iran. Montazeri, the handpicked successor of Khomeini, was sacked for his public objections to mass executions in 1988. He spent the rest of his life under house arrest and died in 2009. His son leaked an audiotape of his conversation with the members of Death Commission in 2016.

    In the moving tape, Montazeri can be heard telling a meeting of the “Death Commission” in 1988 and that they are responsible for a crime against humanity. He said: “The greatest crime committed during the reign of the Islamic Republic, for which history will condemn us, has been committed by you. Your names will in the future be etched in the annals of history as criminals.”

    Rewarding the culprits

    In the backward system of twisted logic, culprits of crimes are rewarded. Some members of the Death Commission still hold high offices in Iran. Ebrahim Raisi is one of them. He was a low-level cleric at the time and in return for his services was elevated in the rank and files of the mullahs’ hierarchy. Raisi is a close confidant of the Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. Currently, Raisi is the custodian of Astan Quds Razavi, the wealthiest charity foundation in charge of Iran’s holiest shrine in Mashhad, northwestern Iran, with very close ties to Khamenei’s powerhouse.

    Raisi and Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi, Iran’s Justice Minister in Hassan Rouhani’s cabinet, were two of the four members of the Death Commission who were tasked by the then Supreme Leader Khomeini to summarily execute political prisoners. In the summer of 1988, the Commission handed down 30,000 death sentences. The kangaroo courts hardly lasted more than three minutes on average. Some of the political prisoners who miraculously survived the slaughter have written or spoken of their ordeals. The judges asked a simple question: Do you still believe in Mojahedin? Depending on the answer, one could go to gallows. The gruesome accounts of survivors, especially female prisoners, often leave the listeners in shock.

    Pour-Mohammadi has since admitted his role in the “Death Commission” and boasted that he was proud to “carry out God’s will and he has not lost sleep over what he did.”

    Alireza Avaie, another member of the commission, replaced Pour-Mohammadi as Rouhani’s Justice Minister in his second cabinet. His personal record in participating in human rights violations goes a long way back when he was partner in crime with the likes of Ebrahim Raisi.

    “The abject failure of the UN and international community to pursue truth and justice for the atrocities committed by Iranian authorities has had catastrophic consequences not only on survivors and victims’ families but also on the rule of law and respect for human rights in the country. Iran’s authorities must no longer be allowed to shield themselves from accountability for their crimes against humanity,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

    Source: ACTION NEEDED ON AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL’S IRAN REPORT

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:57 pm on 24 Dec 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, Ahmad Raouf-Basharidoust, Ingrid Betancourt, , ,   

    A New Graphic Novel – a Little Prince in the Land of the Mullahs. 

    Iran-A-New-Graphic-Novel---a-Little-Prince-in-the-Land-of-the-Mullahs

    The true story of a young freedom-loving Iranian man

    The story of “A Little Prince in the Land of the Mullahs” is a graphic novel about the Iranian youth’s fight for freedom. Published by “Société des écrivains” publishers and prefaced by Ingrid Betancourt, this new graphic book is the story of Ahmad, an intrepid young Iranian, driven by the ideals of freedom, shared happiness and equality.

    Carried by the hope of one day making them known to his country and people, he faced the violence of the totalitarian regime of the mullahs, risking his life in a long and difficult struggle that took him to prison.

    Ahmad Raouf-Basharidoust, born in 1964 to a middle-class family and raised in northern Iran, tells of his childhood in Shah’s Iran, the 1979 revolution and Khomeini’s rise to power. He goes on to depict the circumstances in which this intelligent and curious teenager became an active sympathizer of the People’s Mojahedin of Iran, the democratic opposition to the mullahs. After more than five years in prison, he was murdered in the summer of 1988 on the orders of Khomeini who had issued a decree commanding the massacre of political prisoners in Iran.

    Through reading this story, not only do we discover Ahmad’s own particular journey, but also the history of a whole generation who lived this revolution and was crushed by the cruelty of the mullahs; a generation that said “no” to Khomeini’s Islamism and his hangmen, despite the terrible conditions of prison and internment; a generation with a dream of freedom and democracy for Iran.

    This story also takes us through the contemporary history of a very ancient nation, covering the period 1964-1988.

    A Little Prince

    in the Land of the Mullahs

    The true story of a teenager who stood up to the Mullahs’ regime in Iran.

    Ahmad Raouf Basharidoust
    1964 -1988

    Preface: Ingrid Betancourt

    Biography: Massoumeh Raouf Basharidoust

    Scenario: Summer Harman

    Research: Summer Harman, Massoumeh Raouf Basharidoust

    Art work: Bunga, David Fernando Monroy Mallorca

    Preface:

    Ahmad’s story, told in comic book form, is certainly not a children’s story.

    Yet, that is how her sister Massoumeh wanted to share it with us. Perhaps that is because this story, which she has carried in her heart for 30 years, is made up of images that are too strong – those of her own life – images that are painfully engraved and that she did not want to betray.

    Massoumeh did not want to write just another story to talk about her brother. She did not want to present cold statistics and a politically correct analysis. Massoumeh wants us to grasp with our emotions that which is inaccessible through reason.

    She needs to bring her brother back to life, so we can get to know him, so he can enter our space, our time, and also – who knows – maybe finally our hearts.

    Telling the story of your little brother is a need, of course, but it is above all a right. It must honor Ahmad’s heroism, the majesty of his spirit, his beauty, his charisma. That is why she draws him for us and makes him speak, because she knows that he alone can be his best spokesperson.

    At the turn of each page we discover him in action, surrounded by his family, in his house, in his street, in his school, with the beautiful landscapes of his native country as a backdrop. We meet his friends and with them, his dreams and fears. Ahmad is there, in front of us, playful, intelligent, courageous, and poetic. We see him growing up in the tumultuous Iran of the 1980s. He became an adult, almost in spite of himself, probably too early, shaken by the violence of Khomeini’s dictatorial regime in Iran.

    From Ahmad’s hand we are entering the heart of the Iranian Resistance – that of the People’s Mojahedin. Early on in his twenties, he and his companions dream of a better future, without oppression, without fanaticism, without exclusion.

    And in this suffocating and misogynistic world of the mullahs, his heroes are his mother and sister: a sister who manages to escape from prison, a mother who dies under the persecution of the regime’s executioners.

    The story of the little prince in the land of the mullahs reveals to us, without any pretenses, the human tragedy facing millions of Iranians. With Ahmad, we can go through this tragedy, live it and try to understand why, so that the truth can no longer be hidden, so that justice can be done, and so that the liberation so long awaited by the Iranian people can happen.

    Ingrid Betancourt

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:39 pm on 26 Aug 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , , Iranian communities’ global conference, ,   

    Maryam Rajavi: Massacred heroes inspire protesters in revolting cities 

    Maryam-Rajavi--Massacred-heroes-inspire-protesters-in-revolting-cities-10

    Iranian communities’ global conference upholds 30th anniversary of the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners

    A global video conference was held by Iranian communities on Saturday, August 25, 2018, to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran upon Khomeini’s decree for the genocide in 1988. The conference connected 20 cities in France, Germany, Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Romania and Canada. A number of political dignitaries attended and addressed the conference where members and representatives of Iranian communities in Europe and Canada participated and delivered speeches. A number of eyewitnesses to the massacre and former political prisoners also testified at this event.
    The conference started with remarks by Maryam Rajavi, honoring the heroes of 1988 and elaborating on their impact as an inspiration to the steadfastness of the organized Iranian Resistance for freedom and nationwide uprisings in Iran. Following is the full text of her remarks:

    Distinguished personalities, dear guests,
    Families of martyrs,
    Sisters and brothers who have spent long years under torture in the dungeons of the Shah and the clerical regime,
    Friends of the Iranian Resistance who have joined us today in France, Germany, Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Switzerland, Italy, Belgium, Austria, Romania, and Canada,
    I salute you all.

    Iranian communities’ global conference upholds 30th anniversary of the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners

    Thirty years have passed since the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran, but the mullahs could not conceal their blood-drenched epical resistance. Neither could their international appeasers undermine this incident in favor of the Iranian regime.

    Today, those massacred heroes are not physically among us. The locations of their graves are not known and the list of their names is a secret. Speaking of their stories is forbidden and inquiring about their fate is a crime. Their song, however, continues to resonate in our hearts and minds.

    On the 30th anniversary of this unforgettable epic, let us rise and honor the memory of the 30,000 red roses of the Iranian Resistance by a minute-long applaud.

    According to the information compiled and published by the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran in a book entitled, Crime Against Humanity, our sisters and brothers were executed in 110 Iranian cities in a matter of a few months in 1988.

    Now, those fameless towns have turned into hubs of uprisings, and those subdued cities have turned into hotbeds of revolt.

    Let us look at Gohardasht of Karaj as an example. Thirty years ago, the resistant political prisoners in this city were lined up in long queues and led to corridors where they were hanged from the gallows. Three weeks ago, however, Gohardasht of Karaj turned into a battle field where courageous youth and resistance units waged an uprising.
    In Shapour-e Jadid of Isfahan, in Shahinshahr, in Izeh, Dezful and Ahvaz, in Malayer, Baneh and Orumiyeh, in Zahedan and Bandar Abbas, and in Kazerun and Arak, people still remember the heroes who were hanged here and there from the gallows.
    They remember their cause and why they sacrificed their lives, and why they persevered in defending their principles to the end.

    The town of Aran in Kashan well remembers her child, Dr. Mansour Paydar, who used every opportunity to treat the poor and the destitute free of charge. He was arrested on his way to join the National Liberation Army and was executed in 1988.

    Shahroud remembers Mahmoud Hassani who wrote a poem in prison: “At nights, when you see a glowing comet in the sky, remember the blazing flames who were extinguished in the cold nights of Evin.”

    Shiraz remembers Fatemeh Zare’ii, the PMOI’s candidate for the first parliamentary elections in Iran. Mahidasht of Kermanshah remembers Daryoush Reza’ii who escaped the torture chambers of Dizelabad Prison, but was rearrested and executed in 1988 along with another PMOI prisoner from Ilam, Behzad Pour Nowrouz.

    Isfahan remembers Fariba Omoumi. Astara remembers Mohammad Reza Saradar Rashti, and Rezvanshahr remembers Houriyeh Ramezani Nejad.

    Mahallat bears lots of memories from Parviz Salimi; Qom remembers Effat Assadi; Saveh remembers Azar Kowsari; Boroujerd remembers Jamshid Assadi, and Lahijan bears memories of Mohammad Sami’zadeh. Khoy remembers Ashraf Mo’ezzi, and Naghadeh remembers Bahman Shakeri who was popular among both Kurdish and Turkish compatriots.

    And Masjid Soleiman is never going to forget Ali Salehi, as Izeh remembers Nahid Kaykavous Nejad forever.

    These names and memories have become eternal in the historic conscience of our society, lending a restless spirit of resistance and revolt to our cities and villages, inspiring the ultimate freedom of our homeland, Iran.

    Former political prisoners have frequently told me that the brave PMOI prisoners chose Massoud Rajavi, the leader of the Iranian Resistance, in the most difficult and intolerable conditions when their choices and loyalty to their cause were being put to test. Those brave souls looked into the eyes of their torturers and interrogators and hailed Massoud Rajavi, or kissed the gallows in his name.

    Without doubt, they had a message by repeating this most forbidden name of our time. Their message to the generations succeeding them was: O’ you, the young men and women, who hear our unfinished stories, you should undertake the path and the cause of Massoud Rajavi! The path of struggle for a society devoid of oppression and exploitation, devoid of suppression and tyranny, and devoid of ignorance and deception. This path and this cause are translated into the sacred word of freedom.

    Dear friends,
    In a verdict which constitutes the most irrefutable document on this genocide, Khomeini issued the order for the massacre and wrote in his own handwriting, “Those who continue to persist on their positions of hypocrisy in prisons across the country are considered as Mohareb (the enemy of God), punishable by death.”

    The question is, what was the position they persisted on and why did Khomeini ruthlessly sentence them to death? What was their crime?

    Their crime was standing up for freedom of the people of Iran, standing up against suppression of all freedoms, standing up against starvation of people, and standing up against destruction of Iran.

    They executed the prisoners for their beliefs. This is an incredible catastrophe but this is what the inhuman clerical regime is all about. Their reaction to dissent, even inside prisons under their own control, is mass executions.

    This is what the mullahs’ theocracy is all about. Any protest and any legitimate demonstration is repressed by detention and torture of participants.

    In the uprisings last December and January, what was the protesters’ demand and what did they do wrong to be tortured to death? The bodies of a number of them were handed over to their families, telling them that they had committed suicide while in detention.

    This is what the velayat-e faqih regime is about. It commits the crime and yet blames the victims of torture and massacre as culprits and criminals.

    In the face of such a monster, is it right to give in, or to stand up, resist and fight back?

    Where can you find a dictator that does not accuse the people’s just and legitimate resistance of terrorism, or who does not try to get rid of freedom lovers and opponents by accusing them of violence? Indeed, which dictator, tyrant or despot has given up on his crimes by silence and surrender of his victims?

    Those who dress down freedom fighters and dissidents for getting tortured or executed, and blame protesters and the oppressed people for getting suppressed, they echo the hypocrite mullahs.

    Dear friends,
    The 1988 massacre is a major demarcation between the people of Iran and their enemies, separating them into two opposing fronts. There are those who try to hush up the massacre, seeking not only to defend the masterminds and perpetrators of this crime, but to fend off the haunting specter of freedom, popular sovereignty and overthrow of the clerical tyranny.

    The so-called reformists, or the regime’s proponents who were totally rejected in the course of the recent uprisings, are still trying to find a way out for the velayat-e faqih but the massacre of 1988 has unraveled their schemes.

    The people of Iran ask them why did they conceal the massacre? What were they doing and what were their roles as this massacre was being carried out? And why are they silent, now?

    The truth is that the resistance of the massacred prisoners has posed a great challenge to the regime’s factions and their accomplices. At the same time, such steadfastness has been the dignified answer of the prisoners to the homicidal Khomeini who had left them with only two options: Surrender or die!

    They sacrificed their lives but sowed the seeds of rising and revolt.

    Thirty years on, the dispute continues to be over adherence to this ideal and resisting for it, an ideal which is today being espoused by the resistance units inside Iran. They are called the forces of overthrow. As Massoud Rajavi has pointed out, “The genuine response, and the essential and real answer, have always been and will continue to be in waging a fierce battle at the highest possible magnitude, such that it would escalate through resistance units, lead to the National Liberation Army, and shatter the troops of the anti-human enemy.”

    Fellow compatriots and dear friends,
    The clerical regime is beleaguered by the eight-month-long uprisings, by the growing role of the PMOI and resistance units in organizing and leading the revolts, and by the consequences of a plummeting and drowning economy. To break out of this deadlock, the mullahs sought to target the Resistance’s gathering in Paris on June 30 by a terrorist explosion.

    In March, they had tried another terrorist scheme against the Iranian Resistance in Albania. And just in recent days, the mullahs’ intelligence and terrorist activities against the PMOI in the U.S. were revealed after two of their agents in that country were arrested.

    These efforts and plots were foiled, of course, and the regime suffered their consequences. And once again, it became evident that the murderers of 30,000 political prisoners will stop at nothing to confront their alternative. It was also proven that terrorism is inherent to the clerical regime.

    There is hardly any place left in the world which has remained immune to the regime’s terrorism. Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, the Arab countries, and even Europe and the U.S.
    This week too, the clerical regime’s cyber terrorism was also identified and banned. This is the system which engaged in large scale misinformation campaigns. The regime has been spending exorbitant sums of money from the Iranian people’s wealth to slander the Iranian Resistance and disseminate false information against it. The regime’s criminal network also seeks to disrupt safe communications and prepare the grounds for terrorist operations. This network must be shut down altogether.

    The mullahs were under the illusion that they could exterminate the resistance movement by massacring its political prisoners, by prolonged suppression, and by demonization campaigns but they failed in their efforts.

    Today, the mullahs’ president Hassan Rouhani pleas to the public to ignore the PMOI’s calls urging them to take to the streets. The regime’s experts say, “A third factor has entered the ring, robbing us before our own eyes of our most pivotal asset and the state’s means of power, namely, ‘our popular support…’ And this third factor is at work, deploying its levers, ‘the resistance units,’… to set fire to the state’s fundamental asset which are the young generations of this land.”

    In reality, the main predicament the mullahs have to deal with today is their democratic alternative. They have actually lost hope in finding a solution to the crucial problems they face. So, they just try to postpone the development which would ultimately lead Iran towards freedom.

    But this is an unlikely dream. The Iranian people’s incessant upheavals have left no place for the realization of such a fantasy. The uprisings are rooted in our people’s eager quest for freedom, democracy and equality.

    The participation of the representatives of Iranian communities from various countries in this conference is a vivid example of this reality.

    In this year’s annual gathering, I reiterated the vital importance of a viable democratic alternative as the pivotal force to advance the struggle for the overthrow of the regime.

    I explained that such an alternative requires, among others, an organization and a leadership; it needs to make sacrifice and pay the price; it needs to have clear demarcations with dictatorship, subordination and dependency; it also needs to have a clear platform for the establishment of a republic based on separation of religion and state, gender equality, and abolition of the death penalty.

    It also needs to wage an unrelenting campaign by selfless supporters of this Resistance to defend Iran’s freedom. Such campaigns used to defend Ashraf and Liberty, and today, they support the uprisings and the resistance units inside Iran.

    These campaigns are heartwarming for our compatriots and particularly the protesters who see that they have such informed and determined advocates all around the world. The organization of Iranian communities in different countries who defend freedom and democracy for Iran and enjoy political, diplomatic and social leverage is part of the wherewithal of the democratic alternative and part of the Iranian people’s assets for Iran’s freedom. Hail to all of you.

    Dear friends,
    For three decades, the international community has been silent over the massacre of political prisoners in Iran. As a result, the mullahs have continued with impunity to violate human rights in Iran, launch terrorist operations, and wage catastrophic wars in the Middle East and other countries.

    Now, the time has come to end this silence.

    The time has come for the United Nations Security Council to prepare for the prosecution of the regime’s leaders, and those in charge of this massacre, and officials responsible for four decades of crimes against humanity.

    The regime’s spies and mercenaries must be expelled from Western countries.

    All relations must be terminated with this regime which takes advantage of diplomatic resources to promote state-sponsored terrorism. The regime’s embassies must be shut down.

    The time has come for the world community to stand by the people of Iran in their uprising against the religious fascist regime ruling Iran and recognize their determination to achieve regime change and freedom.

    On the 30th anniversary of the heroes slain in 1988, I urge my fellow compatriots and particularly the courageous youth of Iran to do whatever in their power to expand the Call-for-Justice movement. This movement is part of the uprising for the overthrow of the mullahs’ religious dictatorship.

    The day is not far when the people of Iran will see the cause of their martyrs realized in the spring of freedom.

    Hail to the martyrs fallen for freedom.
    Hail to the people of Iran and God bless you all.

    Maryam Rajavi: Massacred heroes inspire protesters in revolting cities

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 3:58 pm on 25 Aug 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , , ,   

    live stream: 30th Anniversary of the Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners in Iran – The Roots of the Nationwide Uprising & its Prospects 

    live stream- 30th Anniversary of the Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners in Iran 25August

    For watching the live stream, click on the below link:

    live stream: 30th Anniversary of the Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners in Iran

    30th Anniversary of in – The Roots of the Nationwide Uprising

    30th Anniversary of in – The Roots of the Nationwide Uprising .

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:22 pm on 23 Aug 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , , , ,   

    Iran’s Forgotten Summer of 1988 

    In Memory of Tulips and Angels of Freedom

    30 years ago, more than 30,000 political prisoners were executed in Iran’s prisons upon orders of Khomeini. Most of those directly responsible for the massacre are currently office holders within the regime and have not been held accountable for their crimes against humanity.

    A member of the Iran News Wire team put this tremendous video together through great efforts and after two weeks of gathering details.

    We think of the victim’s families who are securing and trying to save what is left to prove the #1988Massacre.

    One recent event by Iran has been to conduct machinery work in exact locations of burials.

    Source: Iran’s Forgotten Summer of 1988

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:32 am on 26 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, Geneva, Human Rights Council, , , Nikki Haley, ,   

    U.N. Slammed by Haley Over Planned Address by Iran Regime’s Minister Involved in Massacre of Political Prisoners 

    AFP: A protest is planned in front of the UN headquarters in Geneva next Tuesday, when Avaie is due to speak

    US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley slammed the world body’s Human Rights Council on Sunday, saying it should be “ashamed” for inviting an Iranian minister, sanctioned for known human rights violations, to speak at the council’s annual meeting in Geneva this week. Haley said that the council was “discredited” by Iranian Justice Minister Alireza Avaie’s slated address to the body’s membership, adding that it only reinforces the United States’ criticisms of the UN and threats to defund the world body.

    “The Human Rights Council should be ashamed to allow Mr. Avaei to address its membership,” Haley said in a statement.“Yet again the Council discredits itself by allowing serial human rights abusers to hijack its work and make a mockery of its mandate to promote universal human rights. This does nothing but reinforce the United States’ call for much needed reforms at the Council for it to be viewed as a good investment of our time and money,” she said.

    Avaei’s appearance alongside some 100 other government ministers and dignitaries from around the world has drawn widespread criticism from both Iranian and international activists. Members of the Iranian opposition now living in exile say that Avaei also played a key role in the massacre of political prisoners in 1988, a year in which Amnesty International says some 5,000 prisoners were executed over the course of mere months. Iranian opposition groups put the figure closer to 30,000. “Allowing Avaie to address the Human Rights Council is disgraceful and would make a mockery of the United Nations and its human rights mechanisms,” Shahin Gobadi, a member of the National Council of Resistance of Iran, told AFP earlier this week. “This must not happen.”Avaei was sanctioned by the European Union in 2011 on the grounds that as Tehran’s top prosecutor he was “responsible for human rights violations, arbitrary arrests, denials of prisoners’ rights, and an increase in executions.” A protest is planned in front of the UN headquarters in Geneva next Tuesday, when Avaie is due to speak.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:47 pm on 11 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 1988 Massacre, , , , ,   

    Amb. Kenneth Blackwell on Iran Human Rights, Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners. 

    In a panel on December 1, 2017 at the National Press Club by the Washington Office of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI-US), human rights experts called for accountability for Iranian regime’s human rights abuses. Referring to NCRI’s newly released book, “Iran, Where Mass Murderers Rule, The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities,” former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Kenneth Blackwell, called for accountability into the 1988 massacre to “put pressure on the regime to give access so that we might shine light on the evils that were done… [to give] hope to [those] inside Iran.” Blackwell added, “our delegation at the U.N. [should] continue to be a leading voice, not only on international terrorism…by the regime, but …to bring justice to a regime … that is a threat to the basic fabric of humanity across the globe.” Former Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, Linda Chavez, referred to the role of women in the opposition. “It is no accident,” that Iran’s opposition movement “is led by a woman, Madame Maryam Rajavi. She stands as a real affront to this regime. The regime hates and fears the MEK [Mujahedin-e Khalq] because in the MEK women … are allowed to lead others. And men are willing to listen and to follow them; a major threat to a regime that wants to imprison half its people.” NCRI’s U.S. Representative, Soona Samsami said, “why the regime continues to perpetrate such atrocities and continuing? The answer is simple; it fears its population. Despite harsh crackdown, Tehran has been unable to extinguish the Iranian people’s yearning for change, freedom, and human rights.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg emphasized, “The violation of human rights has become an inconvenient truth to those who have decided that the Iran nuclear agreement is what begins and ends our engagement with Iran… We need to begin holding Iran accountable.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain, Adam Ereli, said, “Many of the perpetrators of this crime are in positions of high authority and this has produced a culture of impunity that Iran’s rulers exploit to continue arresting, torturing, and murdering at will and without consequences or penalty… The only way to stop rogue regimes from using terror and murder as tools of their rule is to hold them accountable for their crimes.”

     
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