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  • Masoud Dalvand 7:34 am on October 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Zarif Nobel Peace Prize Nominee for Iran Deal while Export of terror abroad continues. 

    Javad Zarif have been mentioned as one of the main nominees for the Nobel Peace Prize because of his role with Federica Mogherini in the Iran Deal,

    We need to remember that his official title during the Iran Deal and still is the Foreign minister of the so called Islamic Republic of Iran, a regime that proudly considers itself as the first “Islamic State” in the world and Zarif is responsible for its foreign affairs including what Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps are doing in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Lebanon, Bahrain, Sudan, Kenya, Argentina and… the list goes on.

    When it comes to the Iranian foreign policy, we all know that the IRGC have got a special force called the Quds forces,

    The Quds forces have for a long time been the main foreign policy makers in Iran, in many cases they appoint their staff in the Iranian embassies all over the world.

    According to an U.S. Department of State report about State Sponsors of Terrorism Overview in 2014 “Iran used the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF) to implement foreign policy goals, provide cover for intelligence operations, and create instability in the Middle East. The IRGC-QF is the regime’s primary mechanism for cultivating and supporting terrorists abroad.”

    State Sponsors of Terrorism Overview

    The Quds Force is the biggest state sponsored terrorist organization in the world with very close ties to Hezbollah in Lebanon, Bashar Al Assad in Syria, Houthis in Yemen and they are somehow the founder of the sectarian Hashd Al Shabbi in Iraq.

    Qasem Souleimani the head of the Quds forces used to be called the man in shadow in the past but in the recent years or to be more precise since the nuclear negotiations started he have been much more in the media,

    When his first pictures in Iraq and Syria started to appear on social media even Iranian government media outlets were confused whether these pictures have been leaked out by mistake or was really published by the Quds force itself, but soon it became clear that the more the Nuclear negotiations were moving forward the more the Iranian interferences in Syria and Iraq became public and the dead tolls started to rise, so did the number of refugees fleeing the war to take refuge in Europe.

    In a teamwork, while Zarif was playing the public relations role for the Iranian regime and tried to look like the moderate smiling foreign minister, he was benefiting the interferences in Iraq and Syria and playing with it as the strongest card he has got in the foreign policy, especially for the implementation of the Iran Deal.

    It seems like the Nobel Peace Prize committee have forgot that Zarif is the head of the Foreign Policy in Iran and Iran’s Forging Policy is based on export of terror and fundamentalism to Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Lebanon
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    The final outcome was that west somehow stopped the Iranian nuclear program for a while but what the Iran gained was to continue interfering in Syria and Iraq and that Obama and many other western countries turned a blind eye on the Iranian interferences in Syria,

    After the Chemical attack in August 2013 Barack Obama concluded that Bashar Al Assad carried out chemical weapons attacks but added that he had “not made a decision” about whether to conduct a military strike in Syria. This is while he had made it clear that a Chemical Attack would be a red line for the United States in Several Occasions.

    Notably Iran and the United States had already opened a secret diplomatic channel and held bilateral talks in Oman on the nuclear issue in March 2013 and Obama knew that a decision about a military strike on Syria will stop the nuclear negotiations with Iran.

    While some European countries are considering the “Iran Deal” as a successful international effort and want to use it as a sample for North Korea they have fully forgot that the same deal forced them to close their eyes by not stopping the Iranian interference in Syria

    Since the beginning of the Syrian Revolution in 2011, an estimated 400,000 Syrians have been killed, according to the United Nations, this is while both Assad and the Iranian Mullahs have proudly announced in many occasions that if it wasn’t for the Iranian interference in Syria, Bashar Al Assad had been overthrown in 2012.

    Mrs. Maryam Rajavi the leader of the Iranian Opposition (NCRI) stated in 2003 that the danger of the Iranian interference in the region is 1000 times more dangerous than the nuclear program.

     

    via Zarif #NobelPeacePrize Nominee for #IranDeal while Export of terror abroad continues. — iranarabspring

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  • Masoud Dalvand 7:31 pm on October 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    What Iran Needs Are Not Concessions But Sanctions 

    With concerns escalating, North Korea should not lead us to tone down our voice and provide further concessions to Pyongyang and Tehran. We should in fact do the opposite.

    More than two years after the flaws of a deal between the P5+1 and Iran over the latter’s nuclear program have become obvious, a chorus is busy insisting there is no other option. While the rendered pact, known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), has failed to rein in the Tehran regime, correct measures are available at hand.

    Some argue the JCPOA has successfully slowed Iran’s dangerous drive to obtain nuclear weapons. The Center for a New American Security held a forum titled, “Consequences of a Collapse of the Iran Nuclear Deal,” featuring “a plethora of prominent speakers advocating in favor of preserving the deal, including former senior Obama administration official, Colin Kahl, a chief proponent of the agreement,” according to The Washington Free Beacon.

    We Do Indeed Have Other Viable Options

    The highly controversial Parchin military complex, located southeast of Tehran, was “inspected” by Iran’s own “scientists” to provide samples to the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency. That is tantamount to asking a murderer to deliver his DNA, in privacy without any supervision, as evidence to compare with that found at a crime scene where closed-circuit cameras recorded his presence at the time of the crime.

    JCPOA advocates say the deal isn’t perfect, yet also claim measures against Iran are ill-founded and can be counterproductive. This is not the case.

    “The administration could discourage global firms from doing business with Iran by leaving open its final position on the deal, and thus placing at risk their business with America,” as proposed in a recent Foreign Policy piece by James Jeffrey, a former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Turkey.

    Yes, such measures would disappoint Tehran. Yet knowledge of this regime’s nature suggests such actions will not push Iran to the brink of abandoning the JCPOA ship, as they are benefiting from the present terms.

    And yes, the Iran nuclear deal is a multilateral agreement, as European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini reminded. Yet also as a reminder, in case of Iran violating the JCPOA terms, the United States can unilaterally launch the “snapback” process and have UN sanctions re-imposed on Iran. In such a scenario there is no need to garner support from Russia or China, both known for backing Tehran, as Security Council veto authority is irrelevant in this regard.

    Appeasement Is a Failed Approach

    With concerns over this issue escalating, the case of North Korea should not lead us to tone down our voice and provide further concessions to Pyongyang and Tehran. We should in fact do the opposite. This dossier should help us realize that appeasement—the same mentality embraced by the Obama administration in blueprinting the highly flawed JCPOA—has placed us where we are today with North Korea.

    Do we seek to trek down the same path with Iran, a state with dangerous influence across the already flashpoint Middle East? One such horrible example is Iran’s involvement in Syria. JCPOA advocates are also describing a “best-case scenario” of providing more concessions to North Korea to muster a “far-from-perfect” pact, similar to the Iran deal, in exchange for Pyongyang to freeze its nuclear development.

    Déjà vu. Haven’t we already experienced this with the Clinton administration’s “Agreed Framework” of 1994? Kim Jong Un recently tested his state’s sixth and most powerful nuclear device, claiming to be a hydrogen bomb. As another harsh reminder, rapprochement with North Korea led to the notorious 2010 sinking of the South Korean destroyer, the Cheonan. It is quite obvious by now that a Pyongyang submarine torpedoed the warship and left 46 sailors dead.

    Does another South Korea naval ship, or a city for that matter, have to be targeted for us to realize that rogue states such as Iran and North Korea will only consider engagement as a sign of the international community’s weakness and take full advantage of it? Or must a U.S. Navy ship in the Persian Gulf come into the crosshairs of Revolutionary Guards’ fast boats for the West to finally open its eyes?

    Some think Iran lacks the necessary will and understands all too well how such a move would spark drastic international measures against its interests. JCPOA advocates (read Iranian apologists) have also delegitimized any concern about Tehran’s intentions by claiming pact violations, such as breaching limits set on heavy water—the substance needed for plutonium-based nuclear bombs—as mere “bumps in the road.”

    This shows those making such arguments either lack the necessary knowledge of Iran’s belligerent nature in the past four decades, or simply fall into the category of Iran lobbyists. Fierce international sanctions left Iran no choice but to succumb to nuclear talks with knees bleeding. More non-nuclear sanctions are needed to make Tehran understand the international community means business.

    “Peace for our time” was the claim made by British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain in his September 30, 1938 speech concerning the Munich Agreement with Adolf Hitler. Seventy million people paid the price of that strategic mistake with their lives. Let us finally learn our lesson of appeasement and put aside such an approach for good.

    via What Iran Needs Are Not Concessions But Sanctions — Iran Commentary

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:34 pm on October 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Trump prepares to wound Iran deal- and then save it 

    Trump

    As a candidate, President Donald Trump described the agreement as “catastrophic” and “the worst deal ever.” | Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

    The president’s national security team finds a way for Trump to wound ‘the worst deal ever’ without killing it.

    Donald Trump’s national security team has unanimously recommended that he decertify the Iran nuclear deal — but that he stop short of pushing Congress to reimpose sanctions on Tehran that could unravel the agreement.

    Trump’s team plans to work with Congress and European allies to apply new pressure on the Iranian regime, according to a strategy developed in an Iran policy review led by national security adviser H.R. McMaster. But the strategy assumes the nuclear deal will remain intact for now.

    The deliberations ahead of an Oct. 15 deadline to certify Iran’s compliance with the deal, a centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy agenda, were described by a half-dozen sources inside and outside the administration who have participated in the internal debate.

    As a candidate, Trump described the agreement as “catastrophic” and “the worst deal ever.” But the strategy represents a nuanced approach to one of the most important foreign policy decisions of his early presidency. The goal is to allow the president to demonstrate contempt for the agreement and broadcast a new level of toughness toward the Iranian regime — without triggering the international chaos several of his advisers warn would follow from a total withdrawal from the 2015 deal.

    Administration officials cautioned that the strategy has not yet been finalized, and that it could change before the president makes an official announcement.

    But Secretary of Defense James Mattis hinted at the approach early Tuesday when he told a congressional panel that he believes the deal is in America’s interest and that Trump should “consider staying in.” Appearing alongside him, Joe Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the agreement has “delayed the development of a nuclear capability by Iran.”

    Though their rhetoric was far more positive about the deal itself than Trump’s, it is consistent with a White House strategy of decertifying the agreement without pushing Congress to dissolve it through sanctions — and may preview an administration effort to signal to Congress and U.S. allies that Trump is not withdrawing from the deal.

    Iran has warned that if the U.S. reimposes sanctions, Tehran might restart its nuclear program. Some experts and former Obama officials say that could begin a spiral toward possible military confrontation.

    Congress requires the president to certify Iranian compliance with the deal every 90 days. International inspectors and Trump officials like Dunford say that Iran is meeting its technical obligations. But Trump must also declare whether the agreement remains “vital to the national security interests of the United States,” and he is unlikely to do so.

    Under the law, Congress would then have 60 days to decide whether to reimpose sanctions lifted by the deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, in return for limits on Iran’s nuclear program.

    Trump is expected to act as early as next week, though White House officials said an exact date has not been set. After he does, administration officials are expected to press Republican lawmakers not to reimpose nuclear sanctions, which would effectively unravel the agreement in the eyes of the Iranian government and many U.S. allies.

    In return, Trump officials, led by McMaster, plan to reassure congressional Republicans — virtually all of whom opposed the deal — with a pressure campaign against Iran.

    That campaign is at the heart of McMaster’s policy review, due Oct. 31, which has been conducted quietly as the debate over the nuclear deal has played out in public. The new policy is expected to target Iranian-backed militias and terrorist groups, including Lebanon-based Hezbollah, and the financial web that facilitates them.

    Of particular focus will be the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, which the administration will designate as a foreign terrorist organization, the first time the military wing of a regime will have earned the label.

    The IRGC is the country’s most powerful security organization but also controls large portions of the Iranian economy. The U.S. designated the IRGC’s elite Quds Force as a terrorist group in 2007, and the IRGC itself has been sanctioned for nuclear proliferation and for human-rights abuses. But the entire IRGC has never been designated a terrorist group.

    Critics of the deal are taking a wait-and-see approach to the new strategy. “Just going after the IRGC, while certainly having a lot of virtues, it’s not a complete strategy. … The IRGC has a very large presence in Syria. What are you going to do about that? You have to see how the pieces all fit together,” said Eric Edelman, who served as undersecretary of defense for policy in the George W. Bush administration.

    Trump has twice certified Iran’s compliance with the terms of the nuclear deal, first in April and then in July. But he bridled in July when advisers presented him with a binary choice of certifying or decertifying.

    During an Oval Office meeting with Tillerson, McMaster and former presidential advisers Steve Bannon and Sebastian Gorka, Trump unleashed a tirade in which he demanded more options and adamantly refused to recertify the deal. Tillerson and McMaster warned him that if he declined to do so, and Congress moved to reimpose sanctions, he would spend the rest of his term embroiled in a bitter debate over the merits of the agreement with allies and foes alike.

    The president ultimately bowed to his advisers, but only after what one senior administration official described as a “knock-down, drag-out fight” that lasted several hours.

    “If it was up to me, I would have had them noncompliant 180 days ago,” Trump told the Wall Street Journal shortly after the Oval Office meeting. “I think they’ll be noncompliant” by the next deadline, he said.

    McMaster has worked for months to produce what White House officials consider a third option that avoids Trump’s previous frustration. Neither the White House nor the NSC responded to requests for comment.

    “One of the options [presented to the president] is to decertify, continue to waive the statutory sanctions, slap on new non-nuclear sanctions, roll out a new strategy, and then make the case to the Hill that this is not the time to reinstate the nuclear sanctions and there will be a broader strategy to strengthen the deal,” said an Iran policy expert familiar with the administration’s thinking on the issue.

    Mattis, McMaster and other administration officials privately complain that the Obama administration allowed the nuclear deal to distort its wider policy toward Tehran, and have told Trump it is possible to challenge Iran on other fronts without breaking the agreement.

    Inside the administration, the debate pitted Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who favored recertification, against others who subscribed to the views expressed by Mattis and McMaster. A smaller camp, including U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley and CIA Director Mike Pompeo, pushed hard for decertification.

    In the end, the recommendation from the president’s national security team, which last met about a month ago to discuss the issue, was unanimous. Though Tillerson continues to favor recertification, according to two administration officials, one said that he disagrees with the president on so many issues that he has learned to “pick and choose his battles.” When it became clear that the rest of the president’s advisers were coalescing around a third option, he opted to sign on.

    The question is how congressional Republicans, particularly foreign policy hawks, will respond to the White House’s pleas. Administration officials have not yet begun making their case to GOP senators, many of whom campaigned against the Iran deal.

    They include Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas, who, in remarks Tuesday evening to the Council on Foreign Relations, was to push Congress to “begin the work of strengthening it and counteracting Iranian aggression, with the threat of sanctions and military action if necessary,” according to advance excerpts of his remarks.

    Originally published at: http://www.politico.com/story/2017/10/03/trump-iran-nuclear-deal-243427

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:10 am on October 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ahwaz, , ,   

    Iran: Shocking video of Iranian guards beating and forcing detainees to bark like dogs 

    A shocking video showing Iranian security forces beating and humiliating their Arab detainees.

    A shocking video showing Iranian security forces beating and humiliating their Arab detainees.

    IRAN, Ahwaz,  A video shared on social media showed Iranian regime suppressive security forces viciously beating and humiliating blindfolded Ahwazi Arab activists forcing them to bark like dogs.

    A masked security officer starts to beat them up by punching them using martial art techniques. He can also be heard calling them names.
    Iranian and Ahwazi Arab activists condemned the torture, which violates civil and international laws and called for punishing the perpetrators.

    The video’s time and place remains unclear but Ahwazi Arab activists said on social media that this video dates back to when Iranian security forces arrested Ahwazi Arabs on August 31 before Eid al-Adha

     

    Source: Iran: Shocking video of Iranian guards beating and forcing detainees to bark like dogs

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:26 pm on October 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran’s People And The Nuclear Deal 

    Discussions are continuing as we speak over the fate of the highly controversial Iran nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). Advocates and opponents are going the limits to present their case prior to the October 15thdeadline when US President Donald Trump is due to determine the status of Iran’s […]

    via Iran’s People And The Nuclear Deal — Iran Commentary

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:44 am on October 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Ignoring Iran’s crimes against humanity bolsters ayatollahs 

    By Soona Samsami

    For 40 days, 22 political prisoners staged a hunger strike in Gohardasht Prison in Karaj, 30 miles west of the Iranian capital of Tehran. Most are serving sentences for dubious political charges. In dire circumstances, they were only demanding their return back to bad conditions.

    Their health deteriorated; international intervention was literally non-existent, limited to a few expressions of concern, but no practical measures to compel the Iranian regime to stop its inhumane treatment of prisoners of conscience.

    Amnesty International’s Deputy Middle East and North Africa Director Magdalena Mughrabi said the protest “highlighted the urgent need for reforms to Iran’s cruel prison system.”

    In other words, the situation in Gohardasht reflected the much larger human rights crisis perpetuated by Iran’s clerical regime.

    There is an underlying need to use this situation, and the many others like it, as a jumping-off point to call international attention to the horror of conditions in which Iranian citizens might find themselves confined for years without ever having committing anything that the world would recognize as a crime.

    In addition, there’s a need to expose a past record of atrocities shocking in its horror and in the lack of international attention to it.

    This year’s United Nations General Assembly convened recently, and as in years past, was addressed by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. To no one’s surprise, Rouhani again portrayed criticism of Iran’s human rights record, including this year’s report by the U.N. special rapporteur on human rights in Iran, Asma Jahangir, as a Western conspiracy to discredit the Islamic theocracy.

    Meanwhile, Iranian citizens and human rights activists are increasingly calling for the perpetrators of massacres, past and present, to be brought to justice. Social media has become increasingly effective at circumventing the regime’s restrictions on free expression, but people are still routinely charged with crimes, even capital crimes, on the basis of something an intelligence agent found them saying on a banned platform like Facebook or Twitter.

    As Rouhani addressed the nations of the world, many U.N. delegates had prepared for his diatribe by reading an article published that same morning by the Wall Street Journal.

    Written by a young Iranian political activist and former political prisoner, the piece decried the regime’s efforts “to force Iranians to forget 1988,” the “summer of blood,” when  approximately 30,000 political prisoners, primarily activists of the main Iranian opposition movement, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI or MEK), were massacred in just a few months.

    They were condemned to death after “trials” lasting only a few minutes for dissent against the theocratic regime. As the young activist plaintively pointed out, “How could their families possibly forget?”

    The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), among others, has repeatedly called for an international inquiry, as the first step toward bringing charges against the key players for crimes against humanity.

    Some 30 years later, Secretary General Antonio Guterres appended a note to the special rapporteur’s report:

    “The families of the victims have a right to know the truth about these events and the fate of their loved ones without risking reprisal. They have the right to a remedy, which includes the right to an effective investigation of the facts and public disclosure of the truth; and the right to reparation,” he stated.

    Both U.N. officials acknowledged the 1988 massacre and subsequent “global denial” of it, but neither the secretary general, special rapporteur, nor any leading international official has yet to do anything practical to actually address that injustice or compensate for past neglect.

    As the United Nations Third Committee drafts its new resolution censuring human rights abuses in Iran, it should include a paragraph calling for the formation of an independent commission of inquiry into the 1988 massacre, with the aim of bringing the perpetrators to justice.

    The Iranian regime must not have a sense of impunity as it proceeds with its current crackdown on Iranian society, specifically in the prisons. If the world does not respond with one voice, that sense of impunity will only grow.

    Tehran must expect consequences for its ongoing crimes, fear consequences for future crimes and face consequences for crimes gone unpunished. Otherwise, the international community must share the stain of the blood on the hands of Tehran’s rulers.

    This is the message thousands of Iranians delivered to the United Nations during the Free Iran rally in protest to Rouhani’s presence on Sept. 20. It is the message Iran’s youth sends each day with their courageous defiance on social media. It is a message that deserves a response.

    Soona Soona Samsami is the representative in the United States for the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), which is dedicated to the establishment of a democratic, secular and non-nuclear republic in Iran.

    Source: Ignoring Iran’s crimes against humanity bolsters ayatollahs

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:27 pm on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mehr, , Schools   

    A look at Iran’s schools 

    By Heshmat Alavi

    As schools open in Iran the conditions of these facilities deserve a comprehensive review. This report is compiled of remarks made by regime officials and a long list of media reports.

    1
    Poor infrastructure of Iran’s schools

    “… poor conditions of schools in Minab (northwest Iran)… reconstruction of such buildings are neglected each year, leading to roofs falling. This endangers the students’ lives and badly influences their learning.” (Official Mehr news agency – March 28th, 2017)

    2

    “Education under falling roofs… an earthquake less powerful than even 5 on the Richter scale will cause vast damages for Iran’s non-standard schools.” (Official Mehr news agency – September 19th, 2017)

    3

    “Most of the schools of Tehran’s 13th educational districted are very worn out,” according to the region’s education director. (Rekna website – July 12th, 2017)

    “The schools of east Hormozgan (southern Iran) are in critical conditions… The roofs of two schools caved in last year… A catastrophe is in the making if special support is not provided,” according to Zolqadr, a member of parliament. (Mehr official agency – July 23rd, 2017)

    4

    “I don’t believe there is any need to close down the country’s mudbrick schools… these schools are built according to regional conditions and answers to the people’s needs.” (Youth Journalists Club – February 25th, 2017)

    5
    “Our school doesn’t have a roof. It’s closed when it rains.”

    “1,000 mudbrick classrooms and 1,700 trailer classes are spread across the country,” according to Nazarpour, construction deputy of Iran’s Education Ministry. (Official ISNA news agency – August 12th, 2017)

    6

    “47 percent of the province’s 4,200 schools are in poor conditions,” according to Lorestan province governor Houshang Bazvand.

    “Tehran is the most deprived city across the country regarding school conditions. Schools that threaten the lives of thousands of schoolchildren in the country’s capital. Is it more important to build trade towers or reconstruct our schools?” (Rah Dana news network – February 25th, 2017)

    “In Tehran there are around 10,000 classrooms in desperate need of reconstruction… some schools in the capital lack even the most basic safety standards… if we witness 4 or 5 Richter earthquake there is a possibility of 17,000 schoolrooms being destroyed. We would need 32 years if we intend to reconstruct these school rooms based on current credits,” according to the director of Iran’s Ministry of Education. (Javan Online – May 9th, 2016)

    “Long lifespans, and lack of necessary budget for repairs and service/maintenance have led to most of our schools to suffer from poor conditions. As a result, once in a while we witness the destruction or severe damage of a number of schools.” (Javan Online – May 9th, 2016)

    7

    “Our country is amongst the ten most disaster vulnerable countries across the globe, fourth in Asia and sixth in the world. In comparison to Japan, Iran is 1,000 times more vulnerable in the face of earthquakes.” (Youth Journalists Club – October 9th, 2015)

    “Statistics show 7 million square meters of the country’s schools are in poor conditions and are in need of a major budget for reconstruction.” (Javan Online – May 9th, 2016)

    “30 percent of the country’s schools are in need of reconstruction… around four million schoolchildren are currently receiving education in these schools.” (Semi-official Tasnim news agency – June 21st, 2017)

    “4,160 schoolchildren in and around the town of Qeshm (southern Iran) are in schools in need of reconstruction,” according to Qeshm’s education director. (Mehr news agency – August 10th, 2016)

    “We are facing the issue of worn-out schools in all areas of Mashhad (northeast Iran),” according to the Khorasan Razavi province Education Organization director. (Javan Online – May 9th, 2016)

    “There are 800 schools in need of reconstruction in all of Kerman province (central Iran).” (Mehr news agency – October 31st, 2016)

    8

    “There are more than 2,000 schoolrooms in 372 schools of Ardebil (northwest Iran)… some dating back to the year of 1916 and in desperate need of reconstruction,” according to Ardebil’s education director. (Javan Online – May 9th, 2016)

    Students of Muguie School in the town of Doroud in Lorestan province sit in class with umbrellas.

    9

    Students of this school are forced to open their umbrellas in their schools due to the poor roof conditions and leaks into the room. (Official Tabnak website – December 26th, 2016)

    10

    This report shows poor schools are checkered across the country in Iran in a slate of provinces.

    When 30 percent of Tehran’s schools are in such poor conditions and in need of reconstruction, the status of schools of more deprived cities around the country is quite obvious.

    Despite all this the government of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani fails to provide a budget for reconstruction purposes. Instead, Iran is increasing its budgets for repressive forces, propaganda circles and exporting terrorism.

    11
    For comparison, a classroom in Pakistan

    Conditions worsening across the country is becoming a completely natural trend in Iran under the mullahs’ rule. When the 17-floor Plasco trade center with 5,000 workers and thousands of customers in the heart of Tehran is so outdated it literally crumbles due to a blaze, the poor conditions of schools in deprived areas of Iran is completely obvious.

    When those ruling Iran are all thieves, stealing from teachers and 12 trillion tomans (around $3.43 billion) from the Teachers Savings Fund, there is no expectation to provide any budget to reconstruct the country’s schools.

    via  A look at Iran’s schools — Iran Commentar

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 3:03 pm on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence. 

    Iran: Over 12,000 women registered as victims of violence.
    The Coroner’s Office of Tehran, capital of Iran, declared that it has registered the names of 12,159 women as victims of violence in four months.
    The public relations of the General Department of the Coroner’s Office of Tehran Province announced that in the four months since the beginning of the Persian New Year (March 21, 2017) until July 21, 2017, it has registered the names of 33,362 people, 12,159 of them women, who had referred to the forensic centers of Tehran province due to injuries they suffered in physical fights. (The state-run Mehr news agency – September 23, 2017)

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/iran-women-news/4327-iran-over-12-000-women-registered-as-victims-of-violence

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:58 am on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    Asma Jahangir Calls on Iran Regime: Abolish Torture and Release Detainees 

    NCRI StaffAsma Jahangir, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran, was interviewed by Al Arabiya’s studios in the United Nations about the current situation in the country. She said that in many areas in the country there are serious violations of human rights – from rule of law, denial of due process, discriminatory laws, people being discriminated against on religious and ethnic grounds and torture. She said that she believes the Iranian government is beginning to look into these violations, however the steps being taken to address then are “very tiny”. The government knows that there are issues that need to be addressed, but she emphasised that it cannot continue to let them drag on because awareness is rising across the world. Jahangir pointed out that the charter of human rights in Iran exists, but the interviewer emphasised that it does not include women and people of ethnic and religious minorities and that the charter is non-binding. Jahangir said that the charter is “a promise” that the government will write policies so that the rights are implemented. She said it is here that the government is taking small steps. With regards to protesters in Iran that are partaking in activist activities so that the situation will improve, Jahangir said that she will not discourage them from speaking up, despite the fact that they risk detention and torture. She reminded them that it is the right of every citizen in the world to speak up for their rights and against incidents where rights are violated. She said that it is important that the activists build tighter networks with human rights organisations, with journalists, with employers, and so on, because they will get security from each other and will be able to devise better and more effective ways to challenge any actions that take away their rights. In her latest report, Jahangir called on the Iranian government to abolish torture and to release detainees as well as a number of other recommendations, but she is unsure that they will be honoured. She pointed out that there must be no tolerance for human rights violations against people who simply want to have their rights asserted or people who fight for the rights of others. Speaking about the 53 political prisoners that were transferred to another wing in the prison in July this year who started a hunger strike to protest their treatment, Jahangir said that the government does not class them as political detainees. She, however, highlights that they are in fact human rights defenders and said the UN has sent urgent appeals. She said that the Iranian government needs to act because it accountable to the Human Rights Council.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:29 am on September 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Vice-President of the European Parliament Strongly Condemns Appeasement Policies of E.P Towards Iran Regime 

    In a speech at the meeting of ‘the Friends of a Free Iran’ in European Parliament, on September 13, 2017. Mr Ryszard Czarneski Vice-President of the E.P once again reiterated his support for the Iranian resistance and its president elect Ms Maryam Rajavi, the following is the full text of his speech:

    Dear colleagues,

    Mr Chairman,

    Thank you very much for holding this important meeting today.

    I am very happy and honoured to have been a part of the Friends of a Free Iran group which has the support of hundreds of my colleagues in this parliament.

    Many of us in this group have different or even opposite views regarding domestic issues or about Europe, including my dear colleagues from Poland but we are all united in our hopes and dreams for a free Iran and in our support for the democratic opposition under the leadership of Mrs Maryam Rajavi.

    On Monday this week the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights said that “Iran continues to severely restrict freedom of opinion and expression.” He said “ill-treatment of prisoners is widespread, and the judiciary continues to sentence people to cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, including amputation of limbs and blinding.” He also stressed that “Iran remains the country with the highest reported rate of executions per capita. “

    I believe this is an important statement by the UN. It should be followed up by adopting tough policies against this religious dictatorship. As long as human rights violations continue in Iran, we can not have a normal relationship with this regime.

    We strongly condemn the current appeasement policies of Mrs Mogherini, who totally ignores repression against women in Iran but went to Iran to take part in the ceremony for Rouhani who does not even have one woman minister in his cabinet. And she keeps calling Rouhani a moderate !

    This policy of closing the eyes to human rights violations in Iran and ignoring the sufferings of the Iranian people, is a disgrace and cannot be done under our name.

    I am deeply concerned about the victims of the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran. Most of the victims were from the PMOI.

    Many of those criminals who were responsible for that massacre in summer of 1988, are still holding top positions in this regime. That includes the current minister of justice who happens to be also in the black list of the EU for human rights violations.

    So I wish to use this opportunity to give a message to the people of Iran that we in the European Parliament are with you and will support you to be free.

    Thank you very much.

     
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