Updates from August, 2017 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Masoud Dalvand 6:51 am on August 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ 

    by Siavosh Hosseini 

    The Iranian regime has increasingly focused on clamping down on anyone who speaks out against the human rights abuses of its ruling class. One of the key areas where this is demonstrated is in the trials of these individuals. Many lack basic legal representation, and the proceedings are brief. If they do have legal representation, there are often hurdles for them to meet with their lawyers and having access to court files delayed.

    Human rights lawyers who speak out against torture and unfair trials have also faced harassment, disbarment, and imprisonment. Trials of human rights defenders generally take place in a climate of fear.

    Amnesty International recently launched a global campaign ‘Brave’, calling for an end to attacks against those defending human rights worldwide.

    “It is a bitter irony that as the Iranian authorities boast about their increased engagement with the UN and the EU, particularly in the aftermath of the nuclear deal, human rights defenders who have made contact with these same institutions are being treated as criminals,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Research and Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

    “Rather than propagating the dangerous myth that human rights defenders pose a threat to national security, the Iranian authorities should focus on addressing the legitimate concerns they raise. These are people who have risked everything to build a more humane and just society – it is appalling that they are so viciously punished for their bravery.”

    Amnesty International, who released a new report entitled ‘Caught in a web of repression: Iran’s human rights defenders under attack’, is calling on the EU to speak out in the strongest terms against the persecution of human rights defenders in the country.

    “The international community, and in particular the EU, must not stay silent over the outrageous treatment of human rights defenders in Iran,” said Luther. “Instead of appeasing Iranian officials, the EU should forcefully call for the immediate and unconditional release of all those jailed for their peaceful human rights activism and for an end to the misuse of the justice system to silence activists.”

    This recent report detailed the crackdown on human rights defenders in a variety of key areas, including the death penalty, women’s rights, and trade unionists, just to name a few.

    Over the past four years, Iran’s judiciary have dropped the threshold for invoking the vague national security-related charges, while increasing the length of prison sentences for these individuals. Many of their crimes include contacting the UN and the EU, as well as international agencies focused on human rights.

    via  Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:14 pm on August 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ,   

    Feminine Face of Poverty in Iran 

    This video clip has been posted on the internet from Iran: 

    Look. Behind me is a woman covered up in veil (chador); she’s wearing a mask to prevent being identified. She is looking through the garbage and trash containers in this late hour of night. She’s looking to find and collect something that she might need to stay alive.
    I don’t know but such people seem to be really honorable. When a woman wraps up herself in a chador and does not want to be recognized and looks through the garbage, it means that she’s been left no other way. There is no organization and no agency in our country to support them and they have to live in this way.
    Is this really what the situation in our country is? Is this the motto in this country about chastity and veil and is this the way they support women?

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:01 pm on August 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    Iran’s women and their lost dreams 

    There are stories of Iran that mainstream media unfortunately refuse to cover. These days it is all talk about the smiling “moderate” Iranian President Hassan Rouhani launching his second term.

    One dark side of Iran the mullahs’ regime have kept a lid on is the status of Iran’s young women. Despite having a highly educated young population, with women comprising the majority of Iranians going to college, the end result, however, is mostly heartbreaking.

    Shahindokht is a young woman in her twenties working at a women’s clothes shop in Tehran’s Haft-e Teer Square. When interviewed she did not allow the reporter from Iran’s state ILNA news agency take photo of the store she works in, not even a small shot for a video-take, and nor will she allow the reporter name the store. She is afraid. Afraid of losing the job she was lucky to even find. When she talks about her conditions, one gets more familiar with the drastic circumstances young Iranian women are enduring these days:

    “I was in my last year of college, unemployed and literally broke to the point that I was going crazy. My father had been unemployed for a few years and barely making ends meet. He had been a factory worker and I don’t know how he was retired after 20 years, while earning less in comparison to others like him. My older brother drove taxis for a while, until he became a drug addict. For the past few years he sleeps until noon at home, then smokes one cigarette after another until evening. He may work a few hours, just to make his drug money. And that’s it.”
    She wants to share more of her pains, about life and her family, about a sister who has divorced, a mother who soon will most likely be diagnosed with Alzheimer… but she prefers to talk about her job, about working in the clothing store:

    “For a few days I would buy a newspaper and look through the ads. I couldn’t find a job in my field, history. As I looked more I started to become hopeless. I came to understand I either had to start selling on the streets or down in the metro, or take a job as a typist or a salesperson. Typing wasn’t easy for me. I started looking for stores selling women’s clothing, and finally, a month later, I found this place. The day when I came for the interview there were many women in line. Such a long line, you should’ve seen it.”

    Now it’s exactly eight months since Shahindokht is selling women’s clothing, and as she said, living on tips and percentage. She doesn’t have a written contract or a fixed paycheck. No insurance either…

    “We receive a monthly salary of two million or three million rials in cash from the storeowner (the equivalent of around $100), for cleaning the place, making tea, providing some service. The rest is from how much we sell. At New Year my salary reached 15 million rials (around $500), but now it’s mostly no more than seven to eight million. I am waiting for late August and September. With schools and colleges opening, young ladies and school girls come flocking in to this square to buy new clothes. That’s when we sellers see better days…”

    In the middle of her sentence two or three ladies enter the store. Shahindokht looked in despair, upset at why she had been standing outside talking. She has to go in or else the other sellers will receive the percentage, and who knows when two or three more customers will come by this store again.

    There are many such young women in Iran’s huge capital, Tehran. Women who are deprived of having a decent job, forced to work in such conditions without a guaranteed future… These women can only afford a very minimum lifestyle if their storeowners are lucky in their sales… if not, they just come and go. Meaningless labor, without any light at the end of a long, dark tunnel.

    This is the destiny awaiting young educated women in Iran ruled by the mullahs’ regime.

    via Iran’s women and their lost dreams — Iran Commentary

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:35 am on August 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison 

    A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison

    Sufferings of mothers of PMOI martyrs

    In the name of God, in the name of freedom, knowledge and justice

    We have already spoken of the magnificent stories of those fallen for freedom. We have written many poems and songs about the most splendid epics created in the Iranian people’s quest for freedom.

    Our hearts are filled with love and faith when we hail the lofty souls of those heroes in chains and those who sealed their honesty and loyalty with ultimate sacrifice.

    I am writing for the mothers and fathers whose strength and resistance make mountains humble. I am writing to pay tribute to their humane interpretation of the word, “mother”, and to thank their abundant love which never dies down and their endurance that passes like a breeze through the stormy sky.

    I turn the pages of my memoirs, to reach the page where I first found your familiar gaze. I could see the glad tidings of life in your kind eyes as if a dandelion was passing through the experience of life with a cry for justice.

    In the noisy days when the POWs were returning home, we had decorated our neighbourhood with strings of light to celebrate the return of Reza, our next door neighbour, Mrs. Zahra’s son.

    On that same day, my mother had gone to Behesht-e Zahra (cemetery). She returned home at around noon. I remember the exact moment. My mother hugged Reza, squeezed him hard and kissed him on the cheeks, as if she was kissing her beloved son, Abdolreza, who had been executed earlier. All day long, you were deep in your own thoughts, and your eyes bespoke of the lashes of injustice.

    My eyes followed you, step by step, cuddling your tall figure. You had been through so many twists and turns, so many ups and downs, you had witnessed so much atrocity, so much injustice, and you were still standing tall.

    I can remember your words on that day. “I wish I could also celebrate the return of my loved ones; although I didn’t see even their corpses, nor did I have the permission to mourn them.”

    NCRI Women fb

    Yes, in the days when people were tossing flower petals in the streets of Iran and decorating all neighborhoods with string lights for the return of POWs, and everyone was engulfed in joy and happiness, there were also some mothers who were mourning their children and their beloved young men and women who had been executed. No one knew what was going on in the hearts of those mothers.

    The lullabies of these mothers became an anthem for freedom so that the Divine rule of God would shine on the Earth and give meaning to the world with His love and mercy.

    The children of these dear mothers and fathers who were sacrificed on the altar, turned into inspirations and symbols of sacrifice, steadfastness and courage.

    fb Marc Nelson

    My parents were only an example of many other parents who had been born human in the darkness of a land where their ancestors had been unjustly hanged by the rope of the scale of justice; they were the ones who ran like blood in the veins of the history of our homeland.

    These were the fathers and mothers who wrote the pages of victory in their own time in the silence of an everlasting love.

    Mother is the symbol of love, sacrifice and selflessness. There were mothers who sacrificed their loved ones but their love and kindness became ubiquitous, a love that could not be written on the paper.

    I would like to remember mothers who stood tall as a loud cry against everything that sought to enchain them; they wiped the dust away from their faces to identify the executioners who killed their children. The executioners could not ever conceive of such steadfastness and endurance. These mothers stood firm to expose the oppression of the mullahs’ rule all over the world and attest to the undoubtable truth.

    1. Mother Mossanna (Ferdows Mohebbat): Her three sons, Morteza, Ali and Mostafa, as well as her daughter-in-law, Nahid Rahmani, and her brother, Nasser Rahmani were executed in the 1980s. Nahid and Nasser’s bodies were thrown into Qom’s Lake because the executioners had to get rid of the large number of corpses before the visit by an ICRC delegation at the time. Mother Mossanna was in prison when she heard about the execution of her three sons. Despite the great pain and suffering, she remained proud and stood tall in the history of our country.
    2. Mother Effat Shabestari: She became paralyzed in prison due to Rheumatoid fever. Her daughters, Raf’at and Soghra Kholday, had been executed. Her son, Qassem, who had been arrested in 1980, was hanged eight years later. When she was taken to see the corpse of her son, she turned her head away and said, “I will not take back the gift I have given in the path of God…”
    3. Mother Jahan Ara: She is known in Iran as the mother of three martyrs. Her fourth martyr, Hassan Jahan Ara, has not been mentioned anywhere. Hassan was a member of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran, who was among those massacred in 1988. This mother was not allowed to say anything, anywhere, about Hassan. She had sacrificed her children for Iran’s freedom but had to remain silent and lonely to mourn for Hassan. Yet, it is her silence that is more telling than any other eloquent speech.
    4. Mother Vadood: Vadood had been martyred before the 1980s. She had looked for him everywhere. Once, she was looking for her son in a morgue, when she recognized him by his feet. She started crying out, pushing Vadood’s cold feet to her chest. When she returned to her prison cell, she told her cellmates, “I put his ice-cold feet on my heart and warmed them up.”

    This is the story of how we were united as humans to watch the rainbow in spring, to feel the pride of mountains and the glory of the sea.

    In those years, when our mothers were suffering in agony, their eyes were filled with kindness and their silence was a cry which called on the world for solidarity.

    Since then until now, I have been turning the pages of my memoirs in anticipation of this moment when the truth of the resistance of these mothers and fathers is narrated, those who did not fear the cold and dark days of oppression, and their strength overwhelms us.

    They were the ones who continued the movement for freedom and equality in Iran. They have been the hope of our nation. The philosophy of their lives and deaths, gave meaning to Iran’s history. They became beacons who show the way towards freedom and a principled life.

    Your cries will not go unanswered. Our call for justice today, is the answer to your cries. There will come a day when we can feel the warmth of the sun of love, hope and justice; a day when prison, torture, and execution will become a fable and a day when Iran will feel your presence.

    Maryam Akbari Monfared – Evin – August 2017

    Source: National Council of Resistance of Iran – Women’s Committee website:

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/articles/4181-sufferings-of-mothers-of-pmoi-martyrs

    via #Iran: A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison — iranarabspring

     
    • bluemoone 5:47 am on August 12, 2017 Permalink

      These stories are so sad they rip the heart right out of you. To be imprisoned and separated by those you love simply for voicing an opinion because you wanted to make a better world for them. Torturous.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 6:18 am on August 12, 2017 Permalink

      Yes, you’re right Danielle, unfortunately these stories there are a lot in Iran, especially you know Mullahs are misogyny, therefore, repression and torture in relation to women in Iran are more intense. Thanks for comments and thank you very much for your great and humanitarian feelings.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 9:31 pm on August 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Women in Political Leadership of   

    Women lead the force for change in Iran 

    maryam-rajavi- central council of pmoi

    Maryam Rajavi with PMOI’s Central Council on the stage, IWD Conference 2017

    August 5, 1993, marks a milestone in the struggles of Iranian women, and the Iranian opposition, the PMOI/MEK which forms the backbone of the democratic alternative to the clerical regime, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI).

    On this day, 24 women were unanimously voted to the PMOI’s all-female Leadership Council to hold the helms of affairs in the organization.

    Twelve years after the beginning of the Iranian Resistance when Iranian women remained steadfast despite enduring tremendous suffering and torture in their struggle for freedom and democracy; and four years after Maryam Rajavi became the PMOI’s Secretary General in 1989, this long line of battle-tested women were recognized as best qualified to rise to the movement’s leadership.

    The landmark event drew a clear distinction between the Iranian opposition and its foe; the former striving for gender equality and women’s participation in leadership and the latter thriving on subjugation of women as a main pillar of its rule.

    The PMOI was convinced that if it were to overcome Tehran’s religious dictatorship, it would have to cast aside all remnants of fundamentalist ideology and culture, including male-domination.

    Thus, women’s leadership in the PMOI/MEK was not about some women replacing men to continue in their footsteps with the same values and methods. Rather, women’s participation in the leadership inspired a major cultural transformation in the ranks of the Resistance and among women all across the country who faced gender apartheid in all realms of their lives.

    As a result of the struggle of these pioneering women and their valuable achievements, the world witnessed the hegemonic role of Iranian women in the course of the 2009 uprising. In fact, three major elements steered women in that path: years of struggle for freedom and equality; the misogynist nature of the ruling regime; and the presence of an organized resistance with gender equality as its ideal.

    The impact of women’s leadership and equal participation could also be seen in the 14-year steadfast perseverance of the PMOI/MEK in Iraq, beginning in 2003 when US invaded Iraq.

    Unarmed, blockaded by an inhuman siege, and subjected to numerous military and rocket attacks by Iraqi troops at the behest of Tehran’s regime, the PMOI’s leading women had the task of defeating the Iranian regime’s conspiracies on the one hand and tapping into the strengths of the organization while avoiding any deviation from the movement’s sole focus on the mullahs’ regime in Iran.

    This was a time when the prospects for victory looked grim. The balance of power in Iraq and the region was clearly not in their favor. Still, they led the movement at such volatile times with no past lessons or precedents to draw on. Through their own vigilance, correct decision-making, risk taking and self-sacrifice, they led the movement at every turn.

    Women’s leadership, put to test 14 years in camps Ashraf and Liberty, succeeded in the face of great adversity with courage, endurance and respect for moral values. The men in this movement, who in their struggle against the male-dominated culture have reached great peaks of their own, also played a significant role in the campaign of perseverance owing to their progress in the realm of humanity.

    The Leadership Council has now grown to become a 1,000-strong Central Council.

    Indeed, women’s leadership could not become a lasting institution and tradition without the support of PMOI/MEK men who have faith in, and are committed to, the ideal of equality.

    Today, as the social conditions in our homeland, Iran, is simmering with strong discontent, the message to Iran’s valiant young men is to rise up in defense of freedom and equality if they want to realize the Iranian people’s freedom.

    The fact that women bear the brunt of repression in Iran, reveals the regime’s defensive tactic against the existential threat it feels from women. The imposition of the mandatory veil on women and flagrant discriminations against them in educational and vocational arenas are only efforts to enchain women.

    Women_force_for_change_ EN

    Iranian women have proven their effective and growing role in the struggle against the mullahs’ religious tyranny, in the scenes of confrontation with the Revolutionary Guards, in their unprecedented resistance in the regime’s torture chambers and dungeons, through their presence in the first ranks of anti-government demonstrations, in organizing the teachers and workers’ protests and protests by other social strata, in organizing and leading an international social and political movement against the religious fascism ruling Iran, and in their active assumption of responsibilities in the organized movement of the Iranian Resistance.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:13 pm on August 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ,   

    What is the status of political prisoner, Atena Daemi? 

    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Childrens Rights Activist Petition

    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Childrens Rights Activist Petition

    IRAN, 06 August 2017— The political prisoner, Atena Daemi, who has been serving time in Evin Prison, was newly framed by the warden and the head of the infirmary as ‘breaching the peace of prison’ with her hunger strike.
    Prison term for Atena Daemi, anti-death penalty activist!
    Prison term  for Atena Daemi, anti-death penalty activist!
    On Monday, July 26, the human rights activist, Atena Daemi was transferred to Branch 4 of Evin’s court from the women’s ward.
    The interrogator informed Atena Daemi that the prison’s authorities have newly filed a complaint against her. Atena Daemi was briefed by the alleged crimes of ‘breaching the peace of prison” and ‘insulting the prison guards.’
    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Children
    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Children’s Rights Activist Petition
    The head of Evin’s infirmary was introduced as one of the plaintiffs in Atena Daemi’s case. This healthcare official expressed concern since the media had earlier reflected his attitude towards the prisoners of conscience as well as the violation of rights. He also intimidated to revenge on some of the prisoners including Atena Daemi for naming him in their letters.
    One of the notorious personnel of Evin Prison named Abbas Khani also filed a lawsuit against another prisoner, Maryam Zarghan who was on the brink of release.
    The Warden of Evin Prison is another plaintiff of Atena Daemi. According to the interrogator, Atena Daemi is accused of breaching the peace of prison with her hunger strike and sit-in protests. She committed these acts to call for the implementation of human rights and review on her case. She is also charged with insulting the prison’s authorities when they accused her of malingering following her hunger strike and her transfer to the infirmary.
     
     Atena Daemi is currently detained in women’s ward of Evin Prison. She is in her 9th months of temporary arrest and waiting for the verdict of the appeal’s court.
    In her defense, Atena Daemi requested the interrogator to allow her trusted physician to be present in the court and give testimony on her critical health condition in time of hunger strike so that they realize there was no malingering. The head of the infirmary is actually the person that should be prosecuted for the charges of depriving prisoners from medical services as well as accusing them.
    A source close to Atena Daemi confirmed the report and stated, ‘Abbas Khani visited the women’s ward of Evin Prison and told Ms. Daemi that she didn’t have any health issues, according to the medical tests. However, Atena believes that the hospital doctor has forged the medical records. The claim was made on the same day that Atena’s doctor had given her Monuril (a strong antibiotic) for her illness.
    It is noteworthy that Abbas Khani prohibited Atena’s transfer to the hospital on July 17, 2017, in retaliation, however, her transfer had been earlier confirmed by the prosecutor.’

    Source: What is the status of political prisoner, Atena Daemi?

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:26 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , ,   

    80 women executed in Iran under Rouhani 

     

    Reyhaneh

    Reyhaneh Jabbari was executed in order to defend herself against rape in October 2014

    According to the data collected from material published by the Iranian state-run press, human rights activists and their websites, or from private sources in touch with the Iranian Resistance, 80 of those executed during Rouhani’s tenure have been women.

    Nevertheless, the actual figures are definitely higher, as most executions in Iran are carried out secretly without anyone knowing except those who carry it out.

    Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran

    Women Executed Under Rouhani
    Released:July 28, 2017

    No. Name-Last Name-Age-Date of Execution-Place of Execution Officially Announced
    1 unnamed woman Sep. 10, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    2 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    3 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    4 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    5 Z S Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    6 N S Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    7 S H Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    8 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    9 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    10 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    11 Kobra Kabiri 48 Sep. 25, 2013 Gohardasht Prison –
    12 unnamed woman Sep. 26, 2013 Kerman prison Mehr News Agency
    13 Nastaran Safari 26 Oct. 21, 2013 Dizel Abad Prison — Kermanshah –
    14 Jazi Darvishzadeh Oct. 26, 2013 Orumieh Prison –
    15 Mitra Shahnavazi Oct. 30, 2013 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    16 unnamed woman Oct. 30, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    17 unnamed woman Oct. 30, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    18 A A Nov. 21, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Justice Department of Yazd
    19 R A Nov. 21, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Justice Department of Yazd
    20 unnamed woman Jan. 26, 2014 Delfan Fars News Agency
    21 Farzaneh Moradie 26 Mar. 4, 2014 Isfahan Prison ISNA news agency
    22 unnamed woman May. 10, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    23 Behjat May. 10, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    24 S T May. 28, 2014 Amol Fars News Agency
    25 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    26 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    27 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    28 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    29 unnamed woman Aug. 07, 2014 Central Prison — Kermanshah –
    30 unnamed woman Aug. 09, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    31 unnamed woman Aug. 23, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    32 unnamed woman Aug. 26, 2014 Shahab Prison — Kerman –
    33 unnamed woman Sep. 10, 2014 Gharchak Prison — Varamin –
    34 unnamed woman 60 Sep. 11, 2014 Central Prison — Rasht Iranian state television & radio
    35 unnamed woman Sep. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    36 unnamed woman Sep. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    37 Reyhaneh Jabbari 26 Oct. 25, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj IRNA news agency
    38 Akram Hosseini 43 Dec. 02, 2014 Gharchak Prison — Varamin –
    39 Marzie Ostovari Dec. 02, 2014 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    40 F GH Dec. 10, 2014 Central Prison — Qazvin Young Journalists Club
    41 Nahid Ghiasvand Dec. 16, 2014 Orumieh Prison –
    42 unnamed woman Dec. 17, 2014 Central Prison — Tabriz –
    43 Nahid Dec. 24, 2014 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj Tabnak Website
    44 unnamed woman Dec. 27, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    45 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    46 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    47 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    48 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    49 Marzie Hossein Zehi Feb. 28, 2015 Kerman Prison –
    50 Mehrnoush Ghavvassi Mar. 07, 2015 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj –
    51 unnamed woman Mar. 07, 2015 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj –
    52 F Yousefi 48 Apr. 25, 2015 Central Prison — Rasht Justice Department of Gilan
    53 Batool A May. 13, 2015 Central Prison — Arak –
    54 Fateme Mehrabani 39 May. 30, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    55 unnamed woman May. 30, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    56 unnamed woman 32 Jun. 09, 2015 announced in the press w/o place Young Journalists Club
    57 Paridokht Molaie far 43 Jul. 29, 2015 Ghezelhesar Prison — Karaj –
    58 unnamed woman Jul. 30, 2015 Shahab Prison — Kerman –
    59 Fatemeh Hadadi 39 Aug. 10, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    60 Fatemeh Salbehi 23 Oct. 16, 2015 Adel Abad Prison — Shiraz Salamat News — Health Ministry
    61 Hajar Safari Nov. 12, 2015 Central Prison — Tabriz –
    62 F Zanjanian Dec. 06, 2015 Central Prison — Qazvin Parsineh website
    63 Zahra Nemati Jan. 06, 2016 Central Prison — Tabriz
    64 Ameneh Rezaiian 43 Apr.14,2016 Prison of Kashmar
    65 unnamed woman Apr. 14, 2016 central prison of Birjand
    66 unnamed woman Apr. 14, 2016 central prison of Birjand
    67 Zeinab Chamani 27 Apr. 25, 2016 Sari Prison Justice Department of Sari-without mentioning the victim’s name or gender
    68 unnamed woman Jun. 02, 2016 Young Journalists Club Central Prison of Qazvin
    69 unnamed woman Jul.17,2016 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj
    70 unnamed woman Aug. 25, 2016 Central Prison — Yazd State-run Iran newspaper
    71 Moluk Nouri Sep. 29, 2016 Central Prison — Orumieh .
    72 unnamed woman January 15, 2017 Central Prison — Karaj
    73 unnamed woman January 15, 2017 Central Prison — Karaj .
    74 unnamed woman March 4, 2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    75 unnamed woman March 4, 2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    76 unnamed woman May/3/2017 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj
    77 unnamed woman May/3/2017 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj
    78 Zeinab Sa’adanlou July/1/2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    79 unnamed woman 25 July/26/2017 Central Prison — Babol
    State-run Ganjineh and Shabtab News
    80 unnamed woman July 26, 2017 Central Prison — Orumieh
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:46 pm on August 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , ,   

    Iran: Bleak future awaits young brides 

     

    41,000 children under 15 years of age get married every year in Iran.

    Social scientist and writer, Rayeheh Mozaffarian, announced these figures on the marriage of girl children in Iran and added, “37,117 girls under 15 years of age got married in 2014 with men of various ages, while 1,249 girls in this age got divorced.”

    Mozaffarian also revealed that the largest number of girls getting married under 10 years of age are in the southeastern province of Sistan and Baluchistan. Next in line are the provinces of Razavi Khorassan, East Azerbaijan, and Khuzistan for marriages of girl children between 10 and 14 years of age in 2014.

    Mozaffarian added, “Early pregnancy inflicts the greatest psychological and physical damages on married girl children… Presently, nearly 1,700 pregnant mothers less than 15 years of age are experiencing their first pregnancy.”

    She also said, “Based on research done, the largest number of mothers who die between 25 and 30 years of age belong to (the southern Iranian) Province of Hormuzgan. On the average, these women have given birth to three children up to this age. After the third delivery, they face the risk of death.” (The official IRNA news agency, July 30, 2017)

     
    • bluemoone 2:45 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      They should be in school and planning for college. Has that always been one is that a byproduct of the US meddling?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 7:18 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      Yes, you’re right dear Danielle, they should be in school, but unfortunately this is situation of women and girls and all of people in Iran under rule of religious dictatorship. Thanks for comment, good luck.

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:22 pm on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 12:10 am on August 3, 2017 Permalink

      I know you and others are working to bring more freedom to Iran. I lend my voice to your cause. The strength of the people is always stronger than the oppressors’. I look forward to the day when circumstances change for all.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:32 am on August 3, 2017 Permalink

      Many thanks Danielle, you are a great friend and a great supporter of human rights. It’s my pleasure friendship with you. Good luck.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 7:47 am on August 4, 2017 Permalink

      Mine too

      Liked by 1 person

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:01 am on July 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    Arrest of young woman in Iran for wearing skirt 

    A young Iranian woman shared a post and a photo in the social networks, reporting that she had been arrested for wearing a blouse and skirt. In this illuminating post, she recounts what happened to her and other women arrested and detained for being improperly veiled. Following is the text of her post:
    They told me it’s forbidden to wear a blouse and skirt.
    It was the first time I was hearing something like this. I never thought the situation in the country was so bad that wearing a skirt could be counted as a crime.
    And it was not just me. Everyone wearing short manteaux which was above the knees or was open in the front, and everyone wearing pants just 90-cms in length, were arrested. They were arresting people en masse. Then, when the van was filled, the captain said, ‘That’s enough. Let’s go!’
    All the girls were weeping. They were so scared.
    When we arrived at the police station, their treatment became really rough. They made threats to send some of us to (the infamous) Vozara (detention center).[1] They had us fill a questionaire and took our photos. Then they made us sign a pledge. And finally, they said (your families) should bring you clothes and covering. We can let you go only after we check and OK them.
    I told the agent, “Although compulsory Hijab is wrong in the first place, what was wrong with my clothes? Is it a crime to wear a blouse and a skirt? Where is this written?”
    He told me, “The color of your hair is like those who worship Satan. Your covering belongs to Israel. Then if you fall down and trip over, your skirt flies up. Then what are you going to do? You have ruined our lives!!”
    I started laughing so hard that all the girls who were crying started to laugh loud, too. But I couldn’t resist. I had promised Tahoora (name of a person) that nothing would happen to me again.
    We were humiliated so much. This wasn’t any feminist tweet or an argument over literature. This was the “reality” going on. The reality that showed the real society was something else.
    There I learned that I must get out of the cyber space and all the hot talks in it. Education and protests must be taken to the streets. When security forces tell me that it is a crime to wear a blouse and skirt, I must not fear and I must punch them in the mouth. It’s time for everyone to take to the streets and demand that violence against women be stopped.
    In the end, I have a question for Rouhani, Molaverdi[2] and other officials who speak of freedoms. Is it a national security crime to wear a blouse and a skirt?
    [1] Vozara is the name of an infamous detention center located on a Tehran street with the same name, where women are taken to for improper veiling but are tranferred from there to other unknown locations to be tortured and sexually assaulted.
    [2] Shahindokht Molaverdi is Rouhani’s deputy in women and family affairs.
    Originally published at freedomessenger.com.
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:19 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    The Truth About Iran’s Evin Prison 

    Evin Prison – Tehran, Iran

    By Heshmat Alavi 

    Two months have passed since the May presidential “elections” in Iran that saw the incumbent Hassan Rouhani reach a second term. The pro-Iran appeasement camp in the West went the distance to raise hopes over the hoax of Rouhani rendering major reforms.

    These voices somehow described Rouhani as a “reformist” and completely neglected the over 3,000 executions during his first term as president. Reports from across the country are turning out to be very disturbing, signaling more troubling times to come in reference to human rights violations.

    As fellow Forbes contributor Ellen R. Wald reported, “On July 16, news came out that an American graduate student at Princeton University named Xiyue Wang had been sentenced to 10 years in an Iranian prison for ‘espionage.’”

    This is Iran again resorting to old tactics of taking Westerners as hostage, mainly dual citizens, to be used as bargaining chips in advancing objectives and politics in negotiations with interlocutors.

    Another practice the regime in Tehran will continue is sending scores to the gallows. The Iranian opposition National Council of Resistance of Iran issued a report recently indicating 57 individuals have been executed across Iran in the beginning of July alone.

    Reports from inside Iran also indicate nearly 120 inmates held in a prison west of Tehran are on the verge of execution. These hangings are planned for the next few weeks, their families say citing authorities, and the sentences of at least 13 individuals are to be implemented soon.

    These alarming reports have all arrived only after a recent tour launched by the mullahs for dozens of foreign ambassadors to visit the notorious Evin Prison located in the hilltops of northern Tehran.

    But of course, no human rights organization or international prison expert were invited, only selected areas of the prison were shown, and merely hand-picked images were provided to the media to depict a highly peaceful environment and go against any claims of rights violations.

    This PR show in Evin, with its history of atrocities, was coupled with Iranian state media outlets pumping reports claiming the jail being upgraded to state-of-the-art conditions.

    Iranian authorities went the distance to showcase specific facilities provided only to rich inmates behind bars for financial crimes. These areas included a gym, an in-house beauty salon, a library and also a restaurant.

    What needs clarification to the outside world is the fact that Evin, along with many other prisons, has a dark history of widespread executions, tortures, and inhumane and unbearable conditions, to say the least. The regime in Iran, with a track record of 63 UN condemnations of human rights violations, is hardly in any position to claim of providing inmates with adequate conditions.

    If Iran truly intends to be transparent, why not begin permitting all international human rights organizations unlimited access to any and all areas of each and every single prison across the country?

    Following this orchestrated tour, Human Rights Watch made a call to Tehran seeking access for rights groups to these prisons. HRW is among many similar entities seeking access to Evin as the facility has been closed to human rights investigators representing independent international and national organizations.

    While there is no expectation for Iran to begin allowing any honest visits, two female political prisoners wrote an open letter explaining the atrocities they endured in Evin.

    Golrokh Iraee and Atena Daemi

    Political prisoners Golrokh Iraee and Atena Daemi described ”solitary cells with no windows, ventilation and lavatory,” “dungeons and dark interrogation rooms,” and “cells known as graves” in Evin.

    Why did this international delegation not visit the women’s ward of Evin where female political prisoners like themselves are held, they asked. Their letter goes on to explain how ward 4 of this prison was renovated by the inmates transferred to solitary confinement on the very day of the ambassadors’ visit.

    Mrs. Maryam Akbari Monfared, another political prisoner whose three brothers and sister were executed during the 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners across Iran, also wrote an extensive open letter as she spends her eighth year behind bars in Evin. Having experienced a variety of Iran’s jails for decades, Monfared wrote, “I’ve witnessed with my own eyes the devaluation of human and humanity” and experienced atrocities also in Shahre-Ray and Gohardasht prisons.

    “Prison food was so little that hungry inmates were forced to collect the residue of other food trays as well as the food which was left on the ground,” she explains.

    “I saw an eleven-year-old girl who was sent into exile from a children correction center to Gohardasht prison so as to be punished… Women and girls who had repeatedly felt the hanging rope around their necks, being on death row for years… Dear ambassadors, who were surprised by what you saw! What you saw was a made-up face of this religious regime’s prisons… I saw inmates on death row in Share-Ray prison, desperately begging their families to talk their judges into implementing their death sentence sooner, as they didn’t wish to stay alive in prison…”

    What needs reminding here is the fact this is a regime founded by the ultraconservative Ruhollah Khomeini who, as the first supreme leader of Iran, authorized the amputation of hands and feet as punishment for thieves.

    All this is more reason for the international community, and especially the Trump administration, to turn up the heat on Iran. The regime in Tehran is resorting to all measures possible to deceive Washington and other parties to delay the blacklisting of the Revolutionary Guards as a major party involved in the mullahs’ crimes against humanity, terrorism and international belligerence.

    In 2009 former US president Barack Obama betrayed universal humane values and chose to side with the mullahs’ regime. And Tehran responded by continuously taking Americans hostage and now putting a show for the Europeans and others.

    Taking strong action against Tehran, similar to the recent sanctions slapped against 18 entities involved with Iran’s support for terrorism and ballistic missile program, will finally signal to the Iranian people that the world has now decided to stand by their side.

    Source: The Truth About Iran’s Evin Prison

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: