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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:37 pm on 1 Mar 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Iranian Women's Struggle,   

    Iran Protests: Role of women in protests of Dec. 2017 and Jan. 2018 

    Iran Protests: Role of women in protests of Dec. 2017 and Jan. 2018

    Iranian courageous women played an important role in recent protests in Iran, these protests are continuing.

    Here(in this video) is a collection of scenes from people’s uprising

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  • Masoud Dalvand 8:59 pm on 14 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Atena Daemi, Golrokh Iraee, , , ,   

    Iranian Resistance Urgent Call to Save Two Lady Political Prisoners on 11th Day of Hunger Strike 

    Atena Daemi(L) and Golrokh Iraee

    The Iranian Resistance calls to save political prisoners, Atena Daemi and Golrokh Iraee, who are in dire situation due to 11 days of hunger strike. The NCRI calls on international human rights and women’s rights advocates to take urgent action to save the lives of the two political prisoners. The two young women are exposed to verbal abuse and harassment by prison authorities in addition to the effects of hunger strike.

    On January 24, Atena Daemi and Golrokh Iraee were unlawfully transferred from Evin Prison to Varamin’s Qarechak Prison in retaliation for supporting the January uprising, after being brutalized on fake charges and a fabricated new case.

    In Qarchak Prison, prisoners are deprived of the most basic needs of life, such as fresh air, drinking water, bathing facilities, minimum medical treatment and sleeping area. Political prisoners are at risk of developing hepatitis and other diseases due to the prison’s overcrowding by ordinary inmates who have dangerous contagious diseases.

    Ms. Daemi and Ms. Iraee have been on hunger strike since February 3, to protest violation of the principle of separation of prisoners’ categories and their unlawful exile to Qarchak Prison, aka Kahrizak II. They demand their own and another inmate, Soheil Arabi’s return to Evin Prison.

    Political prisoner Soheil Arabi, blogger and photographer, went on hunger strike on January 24 in protest to violent treatment of Atena Daemi and Golrokh Iraee, after which he was sent to exile to Greater Tehran’a Prison.

    Atena Daemi, 29, a human rights and child rights activist is sentenced to 7 years in prison on charges of “propaganda against the regime”, “collusion against national security”, and insulting Khamenei. Golrokh Iraee, 37, a human rights activist, is sentenced to six years in prison for “insulting the sanctities” and insulting Khamenei.

    Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran
    February 13, 2018

     
    • Sam 8:28 am on 15 Feb 2018 Permalink

      I hope you can add a subscription widget
      to your blog so when it’s publish people
      will be notified

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:08 am on 15 Feb 2018 Permalink

      Thanks Sam for comment, I have to say my blog has subscription widget, you can see it right side on the top of blog.

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:10 am on 15 Feb 2018 Permalink

      Also you can share each article with social media button on the down of the article.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 6:06 pm on 25 Jan 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , The girl of Enghelab street, Theran, , Vida Movahed, ,   

    Iran regime must free the woman who took stand against compulsory veiling 

    Vida Movahed

    The image of a young Iranian woman protesting against the compulsory hijab quickly went viral on social media.

    Amnesty International is calling on Iranian authorities to “immediately and unconditionally” release a woman who was arrested in Tehran last month for apparently protesting peacefully against the country’s mandatory Islamic dress code.

    In a January 24 statement, the London-based rights group also reiterated its calls on the authorities to “end the persecution of women who speak out against compulsory veiling, and abolish this discriminatory and humiliating practice.”

    A video showing the woman standing on a concrete structure in Tehran’s Enghelab (Revolution) Street without wearing a headscarf has gone viral on social media since December 27.

    She was silently waving a white flag in an apparent protest against the compulsory hijab, which in Iran refers to Islamic dress that covers the hair and body.

    Amnesty International quoted three eyewitnesses as saying that police arrested the woman on the spot and transferred her to a nearby detention center.

    Her name, Vida Movahed, is said to be 31 years old and has a 19-month-old baby.

    She boldly protested the compulsory veil in crowded downtown Tehran by taking off her shawl and waving it in the air on a stick. Simultaneously, she spoke about freedom and women’s right to choose their own clothing. A number of youths present in the scene gave her support.

    The incident took place on Wednesday, December 27, 2017, in Tehran’s Enghelab Avenue. The State Security forces arrested the young woman and the young passersby who had supported her.

    The arrests were made the same day as Tehran’s police chief claimed that no one would be arrested for mal-veiling. He said no criminal complaints would be filed for them, they will not be sent to court but will have to attend “educational” classes to correct their behavior. (The state-run Tasnim news agency – December 27, 2017)

    But the reality that exists in Iran today is that the repression of women was not unique to this young woman.

    The NCRI Women’s Committee, published a video about detainees during Iran protests especially women.  According to the information released by the committee, 400 women have been arrested in the southwestern city of Izeh, alone. Dozens of women have been arrested in Tehran. Seven women arrested in the city of Saqqez, in Iranian Kurdistan.
    In the first two weeks of January, 50 were shot dead and at least 8000 people have been arrested for taking part in the uprising and exercising their rights to freedom of expression and association.  At least 10 of these prisoners have been tortured to death in prison.

    The NCRI Women’s Committee echoes the Iranian people’s demand is to take urgent action to immediately release all those imprisoned under torture for taking part in the uprising.

    The fact is, the most striking images coming from Iran uprising are of women.
    They are risking the most to speak out against the Iranian regime.
    Women have demonstrated tremendous courage in the nationwide protests.
    The NCRI Women’s Committee calls on all freedom loving people of the world to support the struggle of Iranian women in their quest for freedom.

    Maryam Rajavi Iran opposition leader urges Council of Europe to compel Tehran to release arrested, she said:

    I urge the Council of Europe and its member states to take effective measures and binding decisions to compel the religious fascism to:

    -Immediate freedom of the prisoners of the uprising
    -Freedom of expression and association;

    No more repression and no more compulsory veil;

    Now and just today.

    Also, a petition has been prepared for the release of the detainees of Iran protests, to be sent to the Secretary-General of the UN. By signing this petition and sharing the news of the detainees, including the girl of Enghelab Street, we should try to release them.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:33 am on 25 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Girl, , , , Sarpol-e-Zahab,   

    Teenage girl becomes a national heroine 

    Haniyeh2

    In the ancient myths, the stereotype for a hero has always been a big, strong man. Recently, however, a story has been circulating in the internet about a frail, young girl who has been named a national hero.

    Haniyeh, 13, used to live in Sarpol-e Zahab, the epicenter of the earthquake that hit Kermanshah Province in western Iran on November 12, 2017.

    “We were at home that night when the earthquake struck,” says Haniyeh. “Our grandma was staying with us that night. We started to run but as I was running away, I suddenly remembered my little sister who was sleeping upstairs on the carpet. So, I ran back inside.”

    As soon as Haniyeh finds and grabs her sister, a steel bar falls from the roof and hits her back and the power goes off…

    “The next thing I remember is that my father came with his car and took us to hospital. My mother was taken to Tehran.”

    Haniyeh’s spine has been severed, but she says, “I do not regret what I did. I’d never wanted my little sister to be in my place.”

    Haniyeh is presently hospitalized in a Kermanshah hospital whose officials are recommending that she be taken to a convalescence home for the elderly.

    Had it been in some other country, Haniyeh would have received numerous awards and offered government aid to receive medical treatment and gain back her health. In Iran, however, the only help available for this young teenager is the elderly house.

    Is this her reward for a loving sister who jeopardized her own life and future opportunities to save her toddler sibling?

    One of the hospital nurses says if she receives a good treatment and physiotherapy there is a chance for her to gain back her health.

    Haniyeh is one out of hundreds of young little girls who have lost their homes and parents in the earthquake in Kermanshah. She is one out of thousands of little girls who are deprived of opportunities and are discriminated against all across Iran. The girl children who burned in Shinabad school, and those who died while taken on a tour by their school.

    Despite pervading injustices, Iran’s women and girls are the force for change and they are the ones who will realize equality and freedom for the whole nation.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:55 am on 23 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Netherland   

    Iran Regime’s Ambassador in Nederland Hates Women 

    NCRI – On Friday December 22, the Nederland news network ‘POW ned’ posted a report concerning the reaction of the parliamentarians who received a Christmas gift from Alireza Jahangiri the Iran regime’s ambassador in Nederland, it is noteworthy that regime’s ambassador had only sent the gifts to male parliamentarians! The report is as follows:

    The holidays are back on the doorstep and so MPs are again overloaded with Christmas gifts. The Iranian ambassador, for example, put a bag of pistachio nuts in the mailboxes of the parliamentarians. Say the export product of Iran. But 50-Plus MP Henk Krol could not appreciate this gesture.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:07 am on 15 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: FLogging, , Student Day, , Young Woman   

    Iran: Flogging Sentence for a Young Kurdish Female Student 

    Flogging a young woman

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran condemns the flogging sentence issued for a young Kurdish female student and calls on the Iranian women and youth to protest against such criminal verdicts.

    The NCRI Women’s Committee urges international human rights and women’s rights organizations to undertake effective measures to stop such cruel and inhuman punishments.

    On December 7, the Student Day in Iran, the clerical regime’s court in Saqqez, Iranian Kurdistan, sentenced Zamaneh Zivi to cash fine and 50 lashes of the whip on the charge of “disruption of public order.” She is a senior student of law at Payam Noor University of Saqqez in Kurdistan.

    The Iranian regime’s resort to such an inhuman punishment for a girl student only indicates its fear of rebellions by the Iranian people, particularly the students and youth. It also reveals the true nature of Rouhani, the mullahs’ president who pretends to be a moderate.

    The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran
    December 14, 2017

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:38 pm on 13 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , NCRI Women's Committee Monthly Report - November2017, Women's Sport   

    Iran: The Grim State of Women’s Sports 

    Women's report

    The Grim State of Women’s Sports

    Numerous reports emerged in November on wide-ranging issues and shed light on the abysmal conditions of women’s sports in Iran.

    No budget for women’s sports2

    Lack of financial support forced the women’s basketball team of Gorgan to refrain from participating in the cross-country games.

    Gorgan is the capital of the northern Iranian province of Golestan.

    The vice-president of the basketball delegation of Golestan said the team had 12 years of experience in professional sports. Soghra Mohebbi said, “The budget predicted for the participation of the women’s team in this tournament was 50 million toumans but no agency stepped forward to provide the budget for supporting the women’s team. One of their reasons was that the games are not broadcast by the national media so the private sector does not feel motivated to spend money on these games.” (The state-run radio and television news agency – November 17, 2016)

    The Pars Jonoubi Jam football team did not participate in the league in November due to lack of budget, and their game was easily cancelled.

    In October, the girls’ basketball team was removed from the Asian U16 games because of the Iranian federation’s $325K debt to FIBA. The team was to take part in the official event for the first time after 37 years. (The state-run ISNA news agency – October 21, 2017)

    No media coverage allowed on women’s games

    It is forbidden to broadcast women’s competitions in Iran.

    The women’s national futsal team, champion of Asia, hosted Italy’s team in Tehran on November 23 and 24, 2017, while no photographers or cameramen were allowed in the stadium.

    The only picture was taken at the end of the games in an empty stadium while Italian players had to cover their hair with pink shawls. (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 24, 2017)

    No job security for female coaches3

    The head coach of the women’s national futsal team complained of lack of job security. In reaction to the Football Federation’s objection, Shahrzad Mozaffar said, “If my contract was for 50% of male coaches’ contracts, I would confidently concentrate on the national team. If I have job security, I will stay with the team.  But if I quit my other job today as head coach of a club team, I would not have job security and a stable income.” (The state-run IRNA – November 23, 2017)

    No adequate place for the games

    Some of the teams participating in the Futsal League had not been allocated a field where they could play.

    The fields where the games took place were peppered with holes and ditches making it impossible for the players to dribble.

    It was also reported that the restrooms and locker facilities were not adequate for the teams to get ready for the game. (Iranwire news agency – November 3, 2017)

    The Vice-President of Women’s Basketball, Fatemeh Karamzadeh, said the absence of a basketball court for women is a real predicament for women’s basketball. “In a country that so much underlines gender segregation in sports, women do not have even one court to play their games,” Karamzadeh admitted. (The state-run ISNA news agency, November 1, 2017)

    No medical support for injured players4

    Zeinab Karimi, footballer of the Kheibar women’s team of Khorramabad (capital of Lorestan Province in western Iran), experienced an inhuman treatment after being injured in the field and suffering a dislocated shoulder.

    In an interview about her injury during the third week of women’s Football League she said, “I was injured in the 20thminute of the game. I remained suffering from pain beside the field until the end of the first half of the game. The supervisor did not even turn an eye on me. The ambulance driver came to me, but when I asked him to quickly take me to the hospital, he answered that ‘the supervisor does not allow this. Since you are not bleeding, we do not have permission to transfer you to hospital.’ After a while, I was taken to hospital by someone’s car.” “I waited for four hours in the hospital before being attended to because I had not been transferred by an ambulance. They did not even give me a chair to sit,” she lamented. (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 5, 2017)

    Violation of FIFA universal rules

    The Iranian Football Federation briefed the teams participating in the Women’s Football League that players would be shown the yellow card if they do not properly cover all their hair during the games. If repeated, they would be shown the red card and sent off the field.

    Female champions are abandoned1

    Atousa Abbasi, a bronze medal winner in the Asian Bicycling Race and a record holder in women’s speed cycling in Iran, had to peddle in the streets for a while due to financial problems. She has been deprived of participating in cycling tournaments due to breaches made by her husband who is a cycling coach. (The state-run Mashreq website – October 18, 2017)

    Sousan Rashidi, who has been the champion of women’s kick boxing for eleven terms, is now training under difficult conditions for foreign tournaments. She is a nomad girl living in Kermanshah (western Iran). Due to poverty and lack of government support, she has to work in the village from early in the morning. She has to bake bread, take the sheep for grazing, bring log wood, etc. (The state-run Fararu website – October 18, 2017)

    Ms. Rashidi says, “Some days, I did not have my transportation fare to go for training. Sometimes, if I were given some money to buy an egg to eat, I saved the money to pay for my transportation.”

    “I became a champion for nine terms, but I did not receive any prize for these victories,” she added. (The state-run ISNA news agency – December 26, 2016)

    Rock climber Elnaz Rekabi won the gold medal of women’s Asian Bold Ring Cup. (The state-run ISCAnews.ir – October 29, 2017)

    In a short interview, she also complained about the difficulties of training without any government backing while being alone in her field. She said, “In Iran, I am very lonely. No one is ahead of me and they do not let me practice with boys.”

    Elnaz Rekabi also spoke on the problems created by the requirement of wearing the compulsory veil. “It is very hard with the veil especially when the weather is hot. I tried to find some proper outfit for this sport to observe the dress code, as well, but I had to do it on my own.” (Interview with Euronews – Aparat.com– April 25, 2016)

    Talented athletes drain

    Horrible conditions for female athletes has led many to leave the country.5

    Dorsa Derakhshani who had been banned from the Iranian national chess team for attending the February 2017 international competition in Gibraltar without wearing the mandatory veil, has joined the U.S. team.

    Dorsa Derakhshani was awarded the titles Woman Grandmaster and International Master at the age of 18 by the World Chess Federation in 2016. She had taken part in several international competitions without covering her hair.

    Dorsa moved to Spain in 2015 after she received an invitation by a chess club that also supported her studies. (The state-run ISNA news agency – October 2, 2017)

    Faezeh Kazemi, Handball player from Qazvin Province, joined the Metropolitan team in Turkey in late November.

    Ban on women’s presence in sports stadiums

    Iranian women were refused entry to the World Cup football match that took place on September 5, 2017, at Tehran’s Azadi Stadium between the national teams of Syria and Iran.6

    The Guardian wrote, “Syrian women are allowed into stadium but Iranian women are kept out, despite initially being allowed to buy tickets… A group of women who went to Tehran’s gigantic Azadi stadium were told they could not enter. When they started demonstrating they were threatened with arrest.”

    The State Security forces expelled three young women who were attempting to enter Azadi Stadium to watch the football match between the two most prominent Iranian football teams.

    The incident took place on October 26, 2017, when Persepolis and Esteghlal teams were scheduled to face off. The female fans had donned men’s clothes in a bid to enter the stadium. (The state-run Rokna.ir– October 26, 2017)

    Shahindokht Molaverdi, Rouhani’s Deputy for Citizen’s Rights Affairs, had recently admitted that the conditions are not yet prepared for women’s presence in football stadiums. (The state-run Entekhab website – October 25, 2017)

    The Iranian regime’s ban on entry of women to stadiums was also noted by the UN Special Rapporteur on human rights on Iran. In Article 92 of her report, she wrote:

    Women continue to be banned from watching sporting events in stadiums, and several female athletes have been restricted from participation in international tournaments either by State sporting agencies or by their husbands.

    She also noted in her report that in March, a number of Iranian female billiard players were banned from competitions, allegedly for “violating the Islamic code of conduct.”

    In April, female participants in an international marathon held in Tehran were required to run separately from men and on a shortened route.”

    Khamenei and religious scholars weigh in

    Religious scholars also underlined the prohibition of women’s entry to sports stadiums.

    “The issue was tabled by the previous government but the Supreme Leader and other religious authorities opposed it,” stated Mullah Makarem Shirazi and added, “It is a deviation to bring up this issue, again.” (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 29, 2017)

    Mullah Nouri Hamedani also tried to justify the ban by saying, “It is not permissible for men and women to be present in the same sports event because women cannot properly hold their veil.” (The state-run Razavi news agency – November 29, 2017)

    The mullahs’ supreme leader Ali Khamenei also underlined the ban on women’s bicycling in public. Under the pretext of responding to religious questions, he reiterated, “Women’s bicycling in public areas and in places that could be seen by strange men is not allowed.” (The state-run ILNA news agency – November 26, 2017)7

    The above facts which are a handful from a ton, show the numerous obstacles created by Iran’s ruling regime to exclude women from the sports arena. They also help one realize that Iran’s women are not only talented but really hard working and motivated to show their competence at every opportunity despite lack of any form of government support.

     
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  • Masoud Dalvand 9:12 pm on 8 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Annual Report 2017, , , , ,   

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran 

    Annual-Report-2017-500x300

    By Masoud Dalvand

    Iran’s Human Rights Monitor has issued a comprehensive annual report of the shameful human rights situation under the rule of criminal mullahs. Referring to the report of Ms. Jahangir, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Iran, explains about the lack of an independent judiciary in Iran and numerous violations of the basic rights of the Iranian people and the suppression and increase of oppression in Iran.

    In this report, the latest criminality of the Iranian regime can be seen in the deliberate neglect of the state of the earthquake in the west of the country.

    Also, with regard to the right to life for humans, the increasing number of executions and arbitrary murders in Iran has been addressed.

    The report provides good information on the situation of Iranian prisons and prisoners in general, in particular political prisoners and women imprisoned, and the intensification of suppression and the very inhuman situation of detainees.

    Another part of the report describes the retaliation against human rights activists in Iran by the mullahs regime.

    Non-human punishments and punishments, such as flogging in public and amputations, are another part of this comprehensive report.

    floggings

    Violations of freedom of expression, the press, religious minorities and ethnic minorities are another part of this annual report.

    Baha'i

    Baha’is

    The violation of the economic, social and cultural rights of the Iranian people, such as workers and child laborers, has been described by the Iranian regime in this report.

    child laborers

    Video:

    You can read this comprehensive report on the link below:

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:15 pm on 1 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Break Ghouta Siege, , ,   

    #BreakGhoutaSiege #Syria: 400,000 children, women and men remain under siege in #EasternGhouta struggling to survive under daily shelling & without access to food and medical care. 

    life the siege

    Like

    iranarabspring

    Syria: Banned Soviet-made cluster munitions fuel humanitarian catastrophe in Eastern Ghouta

    Verified photographs show Soviet-made cluster munitions used over densely populated areas by Syrian government forces
    Doctors describe dire humanitarian situation – including widespread malnutrition – amid tightening siege
    Witnesses recount indiscriminate attacks killing civilians as Syrian forces commit daily war crimes

    Syrian government forces’ increasing use of banned Soviet-made cluster munitions to carry out indiscriminate attacks and direct attacks on civilians…

    View original post 1,442 more words

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:31 pm on 27 Nov 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ,   

    Theresia Bothe singing in solidarity with the women of Iranian Resistance 

     
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