Updates from March, 2018 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:14 am on 16 Mar 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Tillerson,   

    Tillerson’s Exit Could Doom the Iran Nuclear Deal 

    Outgoing U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson making a statement on his departure at the State Department in Washington, D.C. on March 13.

    Outgoing U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson making a statement on his departure at the State Department in Washington, D.C. on March 13.

    Foreign Policy, MARCH 15, 2018 – President Donald Trump’s sacking of his top diplomat, Rex Tillerson, signals America’s likely withdrawal from the Iran nuclear agreement, and raises the risk of a possible military confrontation with the regime in Tehran.
    The future of the Iran deal was already in serious doubt after Trump issued an ultimatum in January, warning he would pull the United States out of the accord unless European allies or Congress managed to “fix the deal’s disastrous
    But by picking CIA Director Mike Pompeo, an avowed Iran hawk, to succeed Tillerson as secretary of state, Trump sent a clear message that Washington was hardening its stance as a May 12 deadline approaches for the possible reimposition of U.S. sanctions.
    Talking to reporters Tuesday about his decision, Trump cited his disagreement with Tillerson over the Iran nuclear agreement as an example of how the outgoing secretary of state had “a different mindset” than his own.
    “When you look at the Iran deal, I think it’s terrible. I guess he thought it was okay…. So we were not really thinking the same,” Trump said before departing for California.
    In recent weeks, Tillerson’s deputies have worked to hammer out an arrangement with European allies that could preserve the deal while addressing Trump’s concerns about its shortcomings, including Iran’s ballistic missile arsenal and provisions that expire in the next decade and beyond.
    “I think it spells trouble for the nuclear deal,” said Colin Kahl, who served as the national security advisor to former Vice President Joe Biden.
    While Tillerson often found himself on the losing side of many issues at the White House, he was a voice of caution and “he did appear to have some impact in delaying Trump dumping the Iran deal,” Kahl said.
    The next round of talks among the United States and diplomats from the United Kingdom, France, and Germany aimed at salvaging the agreement is due to go ahead as planned in Berlin this week, officials say. And a meeting of all the signatories to the Iran deal, which includes the U.K., France, Germany, Russia, China, Iran, and the United States, is scheduled for Friday in Vienna.
    Despite Trump’s abrupt firing of Tillerson, the outgoing secretary of state’s top aide, Brian Hook, will attend the meetings in Europe, a State Department spokesperson said. Hook was an influential figure on Tillerson’s staff and it’s unlikely he will stay on under Pompeo.
    The 2015 agreement between Iran and world powers, which former President Barack Obama touted as a diplomatic breakthrough, imposed elaborate restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program while lifting an array of U.S. and international sanctions that had damaged the country’s economy. In his 2016 presidential campaign, Trump railed against the agreement as the “worst deal ever,” saying Iran had won relief from sanctions without having to give up enough in return.
    As president, Trump bristled when faced with a U.S. law that required him to regularly certify to Congress whether Iran was complying with the deal and whether the agreement was in America’s interest. In October, Trump told Congress he could not certify that the agreement was in the national interest but stopped short of pulling the United States out.
    Over the past 14 months, Tillerson, along with Defense Secretary James Mattis, repeatedly argued in White House meetings against abandoning the agreement on grounds that it had imposed important limits on Tehran’s nuclear work. Instead, Tillerson proposed trying to address the president’s concerns by negotiating a supplemental agreement or other arrangement with the Europeans, while retaining the benefits of the current deal.
    Trump’s January ultimatum set May 12 as the next key deadline, when he will have to decide whether to re-impose a slew of U.S. sanctions that were lifted as part of the nuclear deal.

    Critics of the nuclear agreement welcomed Tillerson’s departure.

    “The selection of Mike Pompeo at State should remove any doubt about the president’s intentions,” said Mark Dubowitz, chief executive of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. “Two months to go and President Trump will snap back the most powerful economic sanctions against Iran unless there’s a real not a fictional fix to the Iran nuclear deal.”
    Omri Ceren, managing director of the Israel Project, a Washington organization that works on Middle East issues, said that with or without Tillerson’s exit, the president had made clear he would not keep sanctions relief in place without concrete improvements to the agreement.
    “In recent days the Trump administration has, if anything, been toughening its stance on what it would take to make the Iran deal worth staying in,” Ceren said.
    If Trump opts to reimpose U.S. sanctions on Iran after May 12, European Union officials have warned that Brussels might try to block the American measures and protect European companies investing in the Iranian market. But analysts said European banks and other firms are already reluctant to do business in Iran due to the threat of a possible “snap-back” of U.S. sanctions and don’t want to lose their access to the vast American market. A U.S. withdrawal could wreck the agreement, scaring off European investment that Iran saw as a key reward for agreeing to limit its uranium enrichment and other nuclear work.
    If the deal unravels and Iran concludes it has no economic incentive to hold back on its nuclear work, then Tehran could expel U.N. inspectors and head down a fast track to building nuclear weapons — possibly in a matter of months. Under that scenario, the United States — and Israel — may decide to take military action to prevent Iran from obtaining the bomb or at least slow down a bid for nuclear-tipped missiles.

    Source: Tillerson’s Exit Could Doom the Iran Nuclear Deal

  • Masoud Dalvand 8:26 pm on 24 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Prospects for Change in 2018, , , U.S. Lawmakers,   

    Prospects for Change in 2018-US and EU policy on Iran- Senior U.S. Lawmakers meet Maryam Rajavi 


    Senior Members of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the United States House of Representatives, Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), Chair of the Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and Emerging Threats, and Judge Ted Poe (R-TX), Chair of the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Non-Proliferation and Trade, met withMaryam Rajavi, on Saturday, February 24, 2018.

    In the meeting which took place at Maryam Rajavi’s residence in Auvers-sur-Oise, the two sides discussed the uprising by the Iranian people that began on December 28, 2017, its consequences and the options before the international community.

    The senior U.S. lawmakers condemned the Iranian regime for its brutal crackdown on the protests and underscored that the international community must break its silence and inaction vis-à-vis the atrocities perpetrated by the regime against its own citizens. They also urged the U.S. Government to impose comprehensive sanctions, including financial and banking sanctions on Iranian regime’s officials and entities, especially those involved in suppressing the protesters. They also called for measures that would enable the Iranian people to overcome the blocking of the internet and allow them access to communication systems. The lawmakers urged the U.S. Government to force the expulsion of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps and its proxy militias from the countries in the region.

    “The uprising marked a turning point in the struggle of the Iranian people to attain freedom and democracy,” Maryam Rajavi said, adding that the “chants of ‘death to Khamenei’ and ‘death to Rouhani,’ and ‘reformer, hardliner, the game is now over’ made it palpably clear that the Iranian people demand the overthrow of this regime.”

    She emphasized that this uprising will continue until the overthrow of the clerical regime because the underlying factors that propelled the uprising, namely economic mismanagement, rampant government corruption, increasing poverty and inflation, escalating suppression, and a whole host of other social and political problems cannot and will not be resolved.

    Maryam Rajavi added, “With the Iranian people’s uprising, the clerical regime has entered its final phase and as such any investment in this regime is doomed to fail. It is time for the international community to stand with the Iranian people and not with the clerical regime.” Maryam Rajavi also called on the international community to exert greater pressure on the clerical regime to secure the speedy release of all protesters.

    “The U.S. Government needs to officially recognize that the Iranian people reject the corrupt and repressive mullah regime in Iran. We, in Congress and the U.S. Government must make it clear that we are on the side of the Iranian people and not their Islamic, fanatic and corrupt allies who oppress them,” Rep. Rohrabacher said.

    Rep. Poe emphasized that the world community must hold the Iranian regime’s officials accountable for their atrocities and assist the people of Iran in their noble quest for freedom and democracy.

    Then two members of the US Congress and a number of European political figures attended a conference called: ” Prospects for Change in 2018-US and EU policy on Iran”

    Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), Chair of the Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and Emerging Threats, at the conference  said: “We’re at this meeting,bcz this is not just about freedom. There’s strong relationship BTW peace,freedom&prosperity.W/out Freedom its Iran‘s military adventurism that endangers the region.”

    Judge Ted Poe (R-TX), Chair of the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Non-Proliferation and Trade at Conference said: ” There’re growing signs that the efforts of Iranian people are cracking the regime. The mullahs are nervous. The Iranian people are giving them nightmares.”

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:16 am on 8 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    How the Iranian Regime Is Using Its Proxy Groups and How the US Can Tackle Them 

    The Iranian Regime has a network of foreign proxy groups all across the Middle East, from large formal organizations like Hezbollah to small splinter groups like Asaib Ahl al-Haq. This means that Iranian influence is spreading further than ever before and is doing so in increasingly diverse ways. How can we stop them?

    At a Policy Forum at The Washington Institute on February 2, Hanin Ghaddar, the Institute’s Friedman Visiting Fellow and a veteran Lebanese journalist and researcher, spoke about the Iranian Regime’s control of Lebanon via Hezbollah and explained the political balance is a mere illusion in Lebanon because of Iran.

    He explained that because of Iran’s power over Hezbollah, the Regime has been able to build a land bridge across the Middle East through Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, which the mullahs will use to transport weapons, troops, and money to its terrorist proxies (including splinter groups) across the region, and expand its power even more.

    At that same forum, Phillip Smyth, a Soref Fellow at the Institute and a researcher at the University of Maryland, explained that if the US wished to tackle these Iranian-backed groups, they must recognise that they are all connected.
    Even though it may seem as if the groups are divided along religious or ethnic or political grounds, they are all reading from the Regime’s script. They are paid from the same coffers, following the same idealogy, and fightinging the same battles.

    Smyth said: “Understanding Iranian ideology will allow Washington to counter it more effectively. Iranian operatives know how to work with individuals and splinter groups, while U.S. policy tends to be more binary in determining allies and adversaries. Going forward, U.S. officials should learn how to better utilize religious networks in the region. They should also take advantage of the fact that Iran overestimates its influence in certain quarters, particularly within the Iraqi army.”

    Both speakers agreed that because of the speed that the Iranian Regime was recruiting fighters via their proxy groups, the fighters were no longer as loyal to the cause or as well trained, which was also a way to attack the Iranian Regime.

    Ghaddar said: “The United States can take several steps in response… In the short term, supporting anti-Iran and anti-Hezbollah candidates in the May elections could harden the line between the state and Hezbollah. In the longer term, Washington would be wise to draw red lines in Syria and stick to them.”


  • Masoud Dalvand 10:58 am on 13 Jan 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    Death of Iran Nuclear Deal (JCPOA) or the next cups of poison? 

    Death of Iran Nuclear Deal (JCPOA) or the next cups of poison

    By Masoud Dalvand

    On 12 January, Donald Tramp extended the Iran deal or JCPOA, for another 120 days.

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump gave the Iran nuclear deal a final reprieve on Friday but warned European allies and Congress they had to work with him to fix ”the disastrous flaws” in the pact or face a U.S. exit.

    Is this an achievement for the mullahs’ dictatorship?

    Looking at the successive news that was released at the same time as the announcement of this, the response appears; deadly news for the Iranian regime, including:

    The US officials have said, Tramp has renewed with dissatisfaction.

    -Trump insists this is the “last time” to extend the deal.

    He said: “Despite my strong inclination, I have not yet withdrawn the United States from the Iran nuclear deal,” Trump said in a statement. “Instead, I have outlined two possible paths forward: either fix the deal’s disastrous flaws, or the United States will withdraw.”(Reuters 12 January)

    US Treasury Department boycotted 14 agencies and other brokers include chief judge of Iran regime. The statement has said: Treasury Sanctions Individuals and Entities for Human Rights Abuses and Censorship in Iran, and Support to Sanctioned Weapons Proliferators.

    Mullah Sadegh Larijani, the head of the judiciary, the head of the Gohardasht Prison, The cybercrime council for censorship, the IRGC cybersecurity, are on the sanctions list.

    At the same time, the United Nations has said that the regime has violated Yemen’s arms embargo.

    The United States also emphasized that the deal should include a missile program and regional intervention of the Iranian regime. The issue that the European governments have come up with and even added human rights violations. (Of course they say that these are out of the JCPOA, but they should be investigated)

    Therefore, it is clear that the extension of this time of JCPOA,(in addition to new sanctions), only for the regime has the result to be forced, to retreat into missile projects, regional interventions and human rights abuses. Namely, in fear of death (abolition of JCPOA), It must commit to suicide (drinking the next poison)!

    And, of course, the regime couldn’t does any maneuver or deception this time (the line that the regime was trying to advance and delay) because the president of the United States has emphasized “last time” to extend the deal.

    That is, until the next 120 days, or the next poison, or death!





  • Masoud Dalvand 8:58 am on 30 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    Iran: “Death to Khamenei” Slogan, Chanted in Major Cities 

    Death to Khamenei

    On its second day, the “No to High Prices” uprising, spread to vast parts of Iran. In Isfahan, the protesters chanted “Death to Khamenei“. In Rasht, the people rushed to the streets chanting “Death to the dictator”, “Death to Khamenei”, “Friday is the mourning day, the rights of our nation is plundered by mullahs”, ” shame on you mullahs, let go the country”, “We die, and will take back Iran”. When attacked by the police, they chanted “Hey Police, go get the thieves”.


    On Friday, December 29, 2017, on the second day of the “No to High Prices” uprising, demonstrations spread to vast parts of Iran. The people and brave youths in many cities, including Kermanshah, Qom, Ahvaz, Isfahan, Quchan, Sari, Qa’mshahr, Qazvin, Rasht, Zahedan, Hamadan, Khorram-Abad, Sabzevar and Bojnourd staged protest demonstrations.

    Kermahshah uprising

    During the uprising of the heroic people in the city of Kermanshah, the capital of the Western Kermanshah province on the morning of Friday December 29, people tore down the regime’s signs and banners, especially the Basij and IRGC banners. The anti-riot forces attacked the demonstrators with baton and severely beat and injured a number of people. The suppressive forces also began to disperse the people with the opening of high pressure water. The women with the slogan of “Shame, Shame, Police shame”, “Do not be afraid, we are all together,” challenged the mercenaries.

    Maryam Rajavi: Uprisings of Kermanshah and Mashhad and other cities are death knell for the corrupt dictatorship of mullahs, and the rise of democracy, justice and popular sovereignty

    Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, President-elect of the Iranian Resistance, saluted the people of Kermanshah and other cities who rose up on Friday chanting “death or freedom”, “death to Rouhani”, “death to the dictator”, and “political prisoners must be freed”, and took part in protests against high prices, poverty and corruption.

    The NCRI’s Foreign Affairs Committee Chair: Iranian People Want Regime Change

    December 29, 2017. The principle plea of the Iranian people in their Uprising called: “No to High prices” is regime change, stated NCRI’s foreign affairs committee chair Mohammad Mohadessin

    And finally, President Trump and other officials In U.S. announced their supports of Iranian people uprising.

  • Masoud Dalvand 10:03 pm on 27 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , ,   

    VIDEO: One way to counter Iran’s aggression? Change the map of the Middle East 

    The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests

    The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests

    Fox News, Dec. 25, 2017 – Iran’s geopolitical ascent is the most significant and dangerous development in the Middle East this century. But while the Trump administration’s new National Security Strategy properly identifies Iran as among the important challenges to U.S. security interests, it doesn’t offer a concrete strategy on how to counter Iran’s growing regional power.

    President Trump should follow the example of President Reagan, who pursued an offensive strategy to undermine the Soviet Union that included supporting indigenous anti-communist insurgents around the globe. Today, America should support indigenous forces that oppose – and seek independence from – Iranian domination.
    Reversing the strategic threat posed by Iran will require a continued U.S. military presence and military aid to local forces in Syria and Iraq. It will also require greater support for our regional allies, such as Israel and Jordan, which must contain the provocative actions of Iran and its proxies. But this defensive posture will not suffice even to contain Iran, let alone transform its trajectory.
    The United States also needs to recognize Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen for what they are: failed, artificial constructs now dominated by Iran. Iran has taken advantage of ISIS’ crumbling caliphate to increasingly consolidate control over these four nations.


    The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests, and it’s time to upend it.

    Maintaining Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen in their existing forms is unnatural and serves Iran’s interests. There is nothing sacred about these countries’ borders, which seem to have been drawn by a drunk and blindfolded mapmaker. Indeed, in totally disregarding these borders, ISIS and Iran both have already demonstrated the anachronism and irrelevance of the borders.
    Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen are not nation-states as Americans understand them, but rather post-World War I artificial constructs, mostly created out of the ashes of the Ottoman Empire in a colossally failed experiment by international leaders.
    With their deep ethno-sectarian fissures, these four countries have either been held together by a strong authoritarian hand or suffered sectarian carnage.
    Indeed, the principal vulnerability of Iran’s regional strategy is its dependence on brutal regimes to rule lands riven by ethno-sectarian fissures. The United States should exploit this vulnerability by supporting those forces in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen that oppose Iran’s domination and seek greater self-determination or independence from their own capitals.
    The result could be transforming these failed states into loose confederations or new countries with more borders that more naturally conform along sectarian lines.
    Any redrawing of political relationships or borders is highly complex, and the United States cannot dictate the outcomes. But we can influence them. We would need to deeply examine each country for its unique qualities and histories, and consult closely our regional allies before deciding upon a policy.
    Here are some examples of policy conclusions that the U.S. government might draw:
    ·         We might cease supplying arms to Iraq and declare our support and strong military aid for an eventual Iraqi Kurdish state, once its warring factions unify and improve governance. We could support a federation for the rest of Iraq.
    ·         For Syria, we could seek a more ethnically coherent loose confederation or separate states that might balance each other – the Iranian-dominated Alawites along the coast, the Kurds in the northeast, and the Sunni Arabs in the heartland. We could also demonstrate we are not anti-Shia Muslim by improving relations with Azerbaijan, a secular Shia country bordering Iran that seeks a closer relationship with the United States.
    An added potential benefit of this approach could be a fomenting of tensions within Iran, which has sizable Kurdish and Azeri populations, thereby weakening the radical regime in Tehran.
    Some might argue this approach impractical, destabilizing and offers Iran new opportunities.
    Perhaps, but the region’s current trajectory is more dangerous. The burden is on the United States to adapt its policy to the dissolving of borders and responding to Iran’s aggression.
    Iran is not a status quo power content to consolidate its winnings; its emboldened radical regime is intended to dominate the region and destroy Israel. An Iranian-Israeli conflict looms ever closer as Iran establishes bases and missile factories in Syria, posing a second front in Israel’s north.
    In addition, Americans must concentrate on Iran’s continued development of nuclear-capable ballistic missiles that could eventually reach the U.S. homeland.
    Artificial states have been divided or loosened before with some success, such as the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia, which are all post-WWI formations. Bosnia and Herzegovina have also managed as a confederation.
    President Trump should take the offensive to Iran. The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests, and it’s time to upend it.

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:53 am on 21 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , ,   

    US New Iran Policy 

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – Following the release of the National Security Strategy, the U.S. is putting the Iranian Regime in its crosshairs for its support of extremism in the Middle East.

    The Donald Trump administration has made it increasingly clear that Iranian regime’s destructive policies will no longer be overlooked by the US and it is now putting their words into action.


    The US has long considered Iran the world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism but now that the threat posed by ISIS is waning, the West can finally deal with the ‘godfather’ of Islamic terrorism directly.

    Just last week, Nikki Haley, the US Ambassador to the United Nations, explained that the Iranian Regime has supplied ballistic weapons to the Houthis in Yemen in order to attack Saudi Arabia and destabilise the region.

    She said: “We are not just focused on the nuclear programme. We’re also taking a hard look at Iran’s ballistic missile program, its arms exports, and its support for terrorists, proxy fighters and dictators.”

    She explained how the Iranian Regime is essentially the facilitator of malign activities across the Arab world.

    She said: “It’s hard to find a terrorist group in the Middle East that does not have Iran’s fingerprints all over it.[This regime is] fanning the flames” of conflict.”


    It is well known that the Iranian Regime is constantly meddling in the affairs of neighbouring states- like Iraq, Syria, and Yemen- and using their destabilisation to its advantage.

    Douglas Silliman, the US Ambassador to Iraq, said: “Iran simply does not respect the sovereignty of its neighbours.”

    Iraq is now seeking to distance itself from Iran and establish stronger ties with Riyadh and Amman, but the problem is still prominent in other Middle Eastern countries, which could mean a US intervention is necessary.

    There are currently over 2,000 American troops stationed in Syria to fight ISIS and US Defense Secretary James Mattis has indicated that they will remain there for the time being to deter other Iranian proxies from making tracks in the country.


    Some have accused the Trump administration of setting the stage for all-out war with Iran rather than attempting diplomatic measures but diplomatic measures aren’t working.

    Human rights activist Heshmat Alavi wrote on Al Arabiya: “[The accusers’] intentions are far from preventing the US from entering a new war, but to protect Tehran from any strong measures, including international sanctions that target the regime and actually benefit the people by weakening the ruling system.”

    Alavi is by no means calling for war with Iran- he cites that with the level of unprecedented infighting between Iran factions, drop in revenue for the country, and international sanctions, war will not be necessary to bring down the Regime. He advises decisive action- like crippling sanctions- to strike a death blow to the Regime.

    This is also the position of the Iranian opposition group, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), who first revealed Iran’s clandestine nuclear programme.

    The NCRI advises:

    • Imposing wide-ranging sanctions on Iran and their Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) and removing access to the global banking system

    • Evicting the IRGC and its proxy militias from Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and Afghanistan

    • Preventing the transfer of weaponry and troops from Iran to these countries

    • Referring the Iranian Regime to the International Criminal Court for its human rights violations- especially the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners- and holding those responsible to account

    • Imposing previous UN Security Council resolutions covering Iran’s nuclear weapons program, banning uranium enrichment, and launching unconditional inspections into the regime’s military and non-military sites

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:44 am on 20 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , ,   

    Understanding Washington’s Fast-Evolving Policy on Iran – Analysis 


    On the doorstep of US President Donald Trump’s first National Security Strategy speech, the administration launched an unprecedented campaign of pinpointing the Iranian regime as the crosshairs on the epicenter of all extremism causing havoc across the Middle East, writes  Heshmat Alavi in Al Arabiya English.

    This comes following a Wall Street Journal article explaining how in the post-ISIS world Washington will begin pinpointing its focus and resources on the larger and more dangerous threat posed by Tehran, Alavi, a dissident writer and human rights activist, wrote on Monday, December 18, 2017.

    The Trump administration has made it clear that a wide array of destructive policies adopted by Tehran have become unacceptable, the article said.

    Described as a “first” by Reuters, last Thursday US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley displayed a detailed exhibition of Iranian equipment used to arm Yemen’s Houthi militias – long known to be backed by Iran’s regime – and thus, to destabilize the region, especially its archrival, Saudi Arabia.

    “We are not just focused on the nuclear program,” Haley said during a press conference at a US Department of Defense hangar where the Iranian equipment were placed before the media. “We’re also taking a hard look at Iran’s ballistic missile program, its arms exports, and its support for terrorists, proxy fighters and dictators.”

    The Iranian regime can also be described as the facilitator, and maybe even the godfather, of a slate of malign practices rendering suffering across the Arabian Peninsula, leading to the Levant and eastward to Central Asia.

    “It’s hard to find a terrorist group in the Middle East that does not have Iran’s fingerprints all over it,” Haley continued, adding how this regime is “fanning the flames” of conflict.

    For decades the US State Department has considered Iran the world’s leading state sponsor of terrorism.

    “We may actually be on the verge of meaningful and long overdue measures against Tehran on this very important and vital subject,” the article said.

    Advocates of engagement vis-à-vis the Iranian regime are accusing the US administration of trailing the path of launching a war with Iran.

    “Their intentions are far from preventing the US from entering a new war, but to protect Tehran from any strong measures, including international sanctions that target the regime and actually benefit the people by weakening the ruling system,” the article added.

    It went on to say, as emphasized by Ambassador Haley, it is high time for the international community to take decisive action, such as crippling sanctions targeting the regime and its belligerent institutions, to finally bring an end to what has become “a global threat.”

    The article added:

    The Iranian opposition National Council of Resistance of Iran, known for blowing the whistle on Tehran’s clandestine nuclear program, indicates how a “firm policy hinges on the following practical measures:

    • Evicting the IRGC and its proxy militias from Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and Afghanistan, and preventing the transfer of Iran’s weaponry and troops to these countries;
    • Imposing comprehensive sanctions on Iran and the IRGC, especially preventing their access to the global banking system;
    • Referring Iran’s human rights violations dossier, particularly the 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners, to The International Criminal Court, and placing the regime’s senior officials responsible for these crimes before justice;
    • Imposing previous UNSC resolutions covering Iran’s nuclear weapons program, banning uranium enrichment, and launching unconditional inspections into the regime’s military and non-
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:45 pm on 7 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , US Senate   

    Maryam Rajavi: Message to the US Senate conference-The new U.S. policy on Iran 


    Message to the US Senate conference-The new U.S. policy on Iran:The Way Forward -December 7, 2017

    Maryam Rajavi: Regime Change Is Within Reach and Iranian People Are Capable of Realizing It.

    For watching the conference please click on the below link:
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:35 am on 24 Nov 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   

    “U.S. Policy on Iran: What Next After IRGC Terror Designation?” 

    US Policy on Iran 11/21/2017

    Sen. Joe Lieberman and Gen Chuck Wald at “US Policy On Iran: What Next After IRGC Terror Designation?”, moderated by Prof. Sasch Sheeahn from UB.
    Click on the follow link for watching all conference:


Compose new post
Next post/Next comment
Previous post/Previous comment
Show/Hide comments
Go to top
Go to login
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
%d bloggers like this: