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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:47 pm on December 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Amb. Kenneth Blackwell on Iran Human Rights, Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners. 

    In a panel on December 1, 2017 at the National Press Club by the Washington Office of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI-US), human rights experts called for accountability for Iranian regime’s human rights abuses. Referring to NCRI’s newly released book, “Iran, Where Mass Murderers Rule, The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities,” former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Kenneth Blackwell, called for accountability into the 1988 massacre to “put pressure on the regime to give access so that we might shine light on the evils that were done… [to give] hope to [those] inside Iran.” Blackwell added, “our delegation at the U.N. [should] continue to be a leading voice, not only on international terrorism…by the regime, but …to bring justice to a regime … that is a threat to the basic fabric of humanity across the globe.” Former Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, Linda Chavez, referred to the role of women in the opposition. “It is no accident,” that Iran’s opposition movement “is led by a woman, Madame Maryam Rajavi. She stands as a real affront to this regime. The regime hates and fears the MEK [Mujahedin-e Khalq] because in the MEK women … are allowed to lead others. And men are willing to listen and to follow them; a major threat to a regime that wants to imprison half its people.” NCRI’s U.S. Representative, Soona Samsami said, “why the regime continues to perpetrate such atrocities and continuing? The answer is simple; it fears its population. Despite harsh crackdown, Tehran has been unable to extinguish the Iranian people’s yearning for change, freedom, and human rights.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg emphasized, “The violation of human rights has become an inconvenient truth to those who have decided that the Iran nuclear agreement is what begins and ends our engagement with Iran… We need to begin holding Iran accountable.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain, Adam Ereli, said, “Many of the perpetrators of this crime are in positions of high authority and this has produced a culture of impunity that Iran’s rulers exploit to continue arresting, torturing, and murdering at will and without consequences or penalty… The only way to stop rogue regimes from using terror and murder as tools of their rule is to hold them accountable for their crimes.”

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  • Masoud Dalvand 8:59 am on December 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Congressman Tom Garrett discussing newly published Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    December 6, 2017–During a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing, Representative Tom Garrett of Virginia decried the atrocities committed by the current Iranian regime, whose creation he described as leading to “bloodshed on a scale not seen in that region for years.” Raising the recently released NCRI-US book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule, Garrett spoke on the 1988 massacre of political prisoners ordered by Ruhollah Khomeini. He emphasized that any radicalization of a religion that promotes intolerance should be vehemently opposed not only by the United States, but internationally as well.

    Representative Garrett condemning radical Islam while holding Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule.

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule is the latest book released by the NCRI-US office. It focuses on the 1988 massacre during which in a matter of months the Iranian regime systematically executed 30,000 political prisoners, mainly members of the main opposition movement, the People’s Mojahedin (MEK). The perpetrators of that massacre are currently in key positions of power in Iran, including the Justice Minister in Hassan Rouhani’s cabinet. For more information regarding the 1988 massacre, please explore the NCRI-US website which is ncrius dot org.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:12 pm on December 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Annual Report 2017, , , , ,   

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran 

    Annual-Report-2017-500x300

    By Masoud Dalvand

    Iran’s Human Rights Monitor has issued a comprehensive annual report of the shameful human rights situation under the rule of criminal mullahs. Referring to the report of Ms. Jahangir, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Iran, explains about the lack of an independent judiciary in Iran and numerous violations of the basic rights of the Iranian people and the suppression and increase of oppression in Iran.

    In this report, the latest criminality of the Iranian regime can be seen in the deliberate neglect of the state of the earthquake in the west of the country.

    Also, with regard to the right to life for humans, the increasing number of executions and arbitrary murders in Iran has been addressed.

    The report provides good information on the situation of Iranian prisons and prisoners in general, in particular political prisoners and women imprisoned, and the intensification of suppression and the very inhuman situation of detainees.

    Another part of the report describes the retaliation against human rights activists in Iran by the mullahs regime.

    Non-human punishments and punishments, such as flogging in public and amputations, are another part of this comprehensive report.

    floggings

    Violations of freedom of expression, the press, religious minorities and ethnic minorities are another part of this annual report.

    Baha'i

    Baha’is

    The violation of the economic, social and cultural rights of the Iranian people, such as workers and child laborers, has been described by the Iranian regime in this report.

    child laborers

    Video:

    You can read this comprehensive report on the link below:

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:48 am on December 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    European Lawmakers Condemn Human Rights Violations in Iran, Express Support for Iranian Democratic Opposition 

    Maryam Rajavi's speech at the European Parliament on the eve of

    Press release by the Friends of a Free Iran inter-group at the European Parliament- Brussels- 6 December 2017 

    On Wednesday, 6 December 2017, on the initiative of the Friends of a Free Iran inter-group at the European Parliament, which enjoys the support of several hundred MEPs from various political groups, a conference on the occasion of the International Human Rights Day was held at the European Parliament in Brussels. The key note speaker was Maryam Rajavi, the President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI). Dozens of MEPs and a large number of parliamentary assistants, diplomats and journalists were present. The Scottish veteran politician Struan Stevenson was also one of the guest speakers.

    Gérard Deprez, Belgian MEP (ALDE) who chaired the conference said: “We call on the EU, especially the High Representative Mogherini to put human rights and women rights first when dealing with Iran. We are bitterly disappointed of her approach who is just obsessed and occupied with the nuclear deal or encouraging western companies to go to Iran. We urge her and also urge our European governments, including my own government in Belgium, to condition relations with Iran to a suspension of executions and a clear progress on human rights.”

    Maryam Rajavi said: “The regime has already exhausted its strategic resources. Economically, they are on the verge of bankruptcy. Socially, they have become ever more isolated. They failed in their strategy of destroying their main opposition and could not prevent the relocation of PMOI members out of Camp Liberty prison in Iraq.”

    Maryam Rajavi's speech at the European Parliament on the eve of

    Mrs Rajavi added that in such circumstances, the regime has two means of survival: more suppression and executions in Iran and stepping up its meddling abroad. This reflects the regime’s major internal crisis which it tries to cover up by expanding its influence in the region. Indeed, it seeks to put up a hollow show of force to discourage the international community from adopting a decisive policy against it.

    The regime’s leaders explicitly say Syria, Iraq and Yemen are the regime’s strategic depth and if they wrap up and leave those countries they would risk being overthrown. She reiterated, “As long as the international community fails to hold this regime accountable for its destructive behaviour, the mullahs will carry on with their dangerous adventures. The solution is showing firmness, not giving concessions. The EU has unfortunately abandoned its values in order to promote trade with the mullahs. It has turned a blind eye on the gross violations of human rights in Iran.”

    Ryszard Czarnecki, Vice-President of the European Parliament, said: “As long as executions continue in Iran, as long as freedom of speech is repressed in Iran, as long as religious minorities including Christians and Sunni Muslims are repressed in Iran, we cannot and we must not have a normal relation with this regime. Our informal group, Friends of a Free Iran, has always said that in our relations with Iran, Europe must put human rights first. We must not compromise on this.” He added: “The Iranian opposition is really feared by the Iranian regime which spends lot of energy and millions of euros against the democratic opposition under the leadership of Mrs Rajavi.”

    The members of European Parliament condemned the systematic human rights abuses in Iran, the regime’s ballistic missile projects and meddling and warmongering in the region. Many expressed support for Mrs Rajavi’s 10-point platform for a future Iran. The MEPs reiterated the following:

    1. Europe must not turn a blind eye to the widespread human rights violations in Iran. Trips to Tehran by European officials and MEPs are in practice to the benefit of the human rights violators in Iran.

    2. The regime’s record of executions, torture and murders over the past 38 years and in particular the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in 1988 must be referred to the United Nations Security Council, and the officials of the regime and those responsible for these crimes must be held accountable.

    3. All signs suggest that the Iranian regime is facing widespread crises. The Iranian people have shown through repeated protests that they seek regime change. It is high time for the European Union to side with the Iranian people in their legitimate desire to achieve democratic change. Recognizing the NCRI is essential for ending and compensating for the previous catastrophic policies. Experience has shown that this regime is unable to reform.

    4. The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) controls the main part of Iran’s economy. The IRGC has brought starvation and poverty to the Iranian people and it is responsible for the massacre of the peoples of Syria, Iraq and Yemen. All economic deals with the IRGC and its affiliated companies must be halted, and it must be blacklisted. It is vital to expel the IRGC and its mercenary militias from the region.

    The MEPs called on the EU High Representative to base any relations with Iran on an improvement of the human rights situation, halt to executions and an end to its meddling in neighbouring countries and its ballistic missile program; otherwise such relations would run counter to Europe’s values and to peace and stability in the region and the world.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:20 am on December 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran: Three political prisoners sentenced to hefty prison terms 

    Three former political prisoners, who were rearrested last year, have been sentenced to overall 28 years imprisonment by the Tehran Revolutionary Court.
    Majid Asadi, Payam Shakiba and Mohammad Banazadeh Amirkhizi They were charged with “acting against national security by gathering and conspiring” and “spreading propaganda against the government.”
    Majid Asadi was sentenced to 6 yearsbehind bars plus two years living in exile in city of Borazjan, in Bushehr province, south of Iran, while both Mohammad Amirkhizi and Payam Shakiba were each sentenced to 11 years of prison.
    Majid Asadi and Mohammad Amirkhizi were also sentenced to two years of forced residence in the towns of Borazjan in Bushehr Province and Nick Shahr in Sistan and Baluchistan Province, respectively.
    Political activist Majid Asadi was arrested by agents of the regime’s intelligence ministry on February 18. Assadi was kept in solitary confinement under severe duress for 50 days, and was incarcerated in Evin’s wards 209 and 240 for months before being transferred to the Gohadasht prison in Karaj, west of Tehran. Incidentally, his transfer took place a short while before the foreign ambassadors’ tour of Evin.
    Assadi previously served another four-year prison term from 2011 to 2015 for attending a ceremony commemorating the victims of the 1999 student protests in Tehran.
    Thirty-year old former students’ rights activist, Payam Shakiba was also arrested in 2009 for his role in disclosing sexual abuse of a female student by an official at Zanjan’s university. He was finally sentenced to six years prison.
    Mohammad Amirkhizi, 63, was also arrested in 2009 charged with supporting of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI). He was released in 2014, after spending five years behind bars.
    Earlier, Amirkhizi’s wife and his brothers were also imprisoned who were later released. The family was charged with meeting Amirkhizi’s children in PMOI’s camp Ashraf in Iraq.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:06 pm on October 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    UN Special Rapporteur Speaks on Dismal Human Rights Situation in Iran 

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran addressed the Seventy-second session of the General Assembly in New York on October 25, to discuss the dismal situation of human rights in Iran that has been prevalent since the Regime took over in 1979.

    Asma Jahangir, who was addressing the General Assembly for the first time since taking the role in November 2016, delivered a report on the first six months of 2017 which was based on sources both inside and outside of Iran.

    Executions

    Jahangir explained that she was worried about the rate of executions in Iran, as well she should be. Currently, Iran has the highest execution rate per capita and is one of the few countries to still execute juvenile offenders, in clear violation of the UN’s Rights of the Child charter.

    She said: “I am concerned by the rate of executions in Iran. Reports indicate that since the beginning of the year 435 persons have been executed…At least four juvenile offenders were executed, and 86 more are known to be on death row, although the actual figure may be higher. I take the opportunity to reiterate my request for a list of all juvenile offenders on death row and reiterate my appeal to the Iranian authorities to urgently abolish the sentencing of children to death, and to engage in a comprehensive process of commutation of all death sentences issued against children, in line with juvenile justice standards.”

    Jahangir also expressed concern about the death sentence levied against spiritual leader Mohammad Ali Taheri for so-called corruption on earth- an exceptionally vague charge which the mullahs use when you haven’t actually committed a crime but they want to punish you anyway.

    Taheri’s trial is believed to have violated several international standards including due process and coercion of witnesses. As such, Jahangir called for his conviction to be overturned.

    She said: “I call for the immediate withdrawal of charges against Mr. Taheri and for his unconditional release, and the withdrawal of charges against all individuals held for peaceful exercise of freedom of expression, religion, or belief.”

    Cruel and Unusual Punishment

    Jahangir also raised the worrying issue of torture, corporal punishment, and the denial of medical care to coerce confessions and punish people, which violates human rights law and international standards of justice.

    She said: “I regretfully note that amputation, blinding, flogging, and the continued use of prolonged solitary confinement continues to be regularly practised. I am also deeply concerned by consistent reports of the denial of access to proper and necessary medical treatment of detainees, including the deprival of medical care as a form of punishment.”

    Many political prisoners have gone on hunger strikes to protest the dismal conditions they are being kept in and the Regime refuses to allow them access to sorely needed medical care.

    Prisoners of conscience

    While on the topic of political prisoners, it is important to discuss the routine detention of human rights defenders, journalists, religious minorities, ethnic minorities, and political campaigners for freedom of expression and peaceful activism.

    As of June 2017, no less than 26 journalists/bloggers had been arrested and/or sentenced for exercising press freedom. Many more had been harassed and/or intimidated by the Regime through interrogation, surveillance, amongst other things.

    Jahangir even spoke to those working at the BBC Persian Service who had been harassed by the Regime and told that if they continued working their relatives would be targeted and their assets would be frozen.

    She said: “They all sought private meetings for fear of the consequence of being identified as having provided information to my mandate.”

    Another worrying trend is that of the imprisonment of dual nationals, like UK charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who have been accused of spying for Western countries and sentenced to many years in jail.

    The 1988 Massacre

    This persecution of ordinary Iranians based on their political beliefs is not a recent phenomenon but is well ingrained in the Iranian Regime’s DNA.

    In 1988, the Regime slaughtered over 30,000 political prisoners in just a couple of months. They buried their bodies in mass graves, refused to tell the families what had happened, and attempted to hide their “crime against humanity” from the rest of the world.

    Despite recent acknowledgements of the genocide from the highest-ranking members of the Regime, the international community has still been largely silent and this silence must end.

    Jahangir said: “The families of the victims have a right to remedy, reparation, and the right to know about the truth of these events and the fate of the victims without risking reprisal. I therefore reiterate my call upon the Government to ensure that a thorough and independent investigation into these events is carried out.”

    Rights of Women

    As you can imagine, women in Iran are routinely oppressed by the Iranian Regime, whether its mandatory dress codes, banning women from attending sports matches, arresting people from reading and sharing feminist literature, excluding women from certain occupations, or many more misogynistic things.

    Jahangir said: “I call upon the Government to address these concerns in practice, and in legislation through ratifying the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and to repeal all laws and policies that discriminate against women and girls.”

    Jahangir paid tribute to the many human rights defenders who have risked their lives to speak to her about the situation in Iran.

    She said: “I have received ongoing and consistent reports of harassment, intimidation, and prosecutions of human rights defenders. For example, the well respected human rights defender, Narges Mohammadi, continues to be imprisoned simply because of her commitment to human rights. I am also deeply concerned by the reports of attacks on women human rights defenders in the form of judicial harassment, detention, and smear campaigns.”

    Even those living outside Iran fear reprisals from the Regime’s many terrorist proxy groups or that their family will be targeted by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

    What’s next for Iran?

    Jahangir expressed hope that the situation would improve through diplomatic action, but this does not seem likely.

    Iran regime’s President Hassan Rouhani made various promises during his campaign, which echoed promises that he made and did not follow through on after taking office in 2013. This so-called moderate has seen over 3,000 people executed during his four-year term and continues to see the Iranian people suppressed at the hands of the Regime.

    The only way to achieve human rights in Iran is through regime change by and for the people of Iran.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:04 pm on October 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Maryam Rajavi’s Message: To the Demonstration of Iranians in Oslo – Norway 

     

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – Maryam Rajavi: The demonstrations of Iranians abroad echo the voice of prisoners’ strikes and protests of workers, teachers and those plundered

    October 7, 2017. On the eve of the ‘World Day Against the Death Penalty,’ and in support of the Call for Justice Campaign, Iranians in Norway staged a demonstration In Oslo, the capital of Norway, Mrs. Maryam Rajavi the president elect of the Iranian resistance sent a message to this demonstration as follows:

    Fellow Iranians residing in Norway!

    Honorable personalities supporting the Iranian Resistance, and the dignified human beings who find defense of human rights, freedom and democracy in Iran as the requisite for ending war and terrorism in the Middle East. I hail all of you.

    I appreciate your demonstration in Oslo and your efforts to expand the campaign calling for justice for the victims of the 1988 massacre and the international campaign to confront violations of human rights in Iran.

    Your gathering is in line with the hunger strikes of political prisoners, the marches and protests of workers, teachers, students and those whose deposits have been plundered and complements them. All these activities have a single message and that is persistence on the desire of the people of Iran to overthrow the Velayat-e Faqih dictatorship.

    The incidents of the past year clearly prove that the efforts to mobilize our compatriots and to attract world attention to the clerical regime’s crimes have a great impact. After years, the issue of the massacre of political prisoners in 1988 has been brought up in an official document of the UN Human Rights Council.

    This is a great achievement and an important step, but it is not enough. The United Nations must set up a committee to investigate the 1988 massacre. The masterminds and perpetrators of this massacre, the executions in the 1980s and other crimes against the people of Iran must face justice.

    I also urge all parliaments to officially designate the 1988 massacre as a crime against humanity.
    Seeking justice for the victims of the massacre in 1988 is an important part of the struggle against violations of human rights in Iran which still continues in the form of daily executions, amputation of hands, and widespread arrests taking place every day to preserve the rule of repression. At least 3200 people have been executed under Rouhani. Another 5000 prisoners are on the death row.

    The regime relies on violations of human rights in Iran and suppression of protesters and freedom lovers to carry on with its belligerence and terrorism in the Middle East. If the regime had not been backed by the appeasement of Western governments, it would not have had a free hand in violating human rights. It would have not been able to extend its crimes to other countries, and it would have not been able to drench Syria in a whirlpool of blood.

    Therefore, I warn Western companies and governments, and particularly Norway, against dealing with the religious dictatorship ruling Iran.

    I hope that our fellow compatriots and Iranian freedom lovers in Norway could with their extensive campaigns attract the attention of the government and companies of Norway to the fact that any dealing and commercial engagement with the Iranian regime assists the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and reinforces its suppression of the people of Iran and belligerence in the Middle East.

    Iran’s ruling mullahs are at war with the people of Iran and the region. We urge Western governments to refrain from aiding the regime in this war through their deals. We urge them to make every engagement with the Iranian regime contingent on end to torture and executions.

    Dear compatriots, I would like to once again appreciate your efforts.
    Your campaign conveys the voice of the oppressed people of Iran to the world. This campaign has more impact today than any other time and is an important help to the Iranian Resistance for the overthrow of the clerical regime and establishment of freedom and democracy in Iran.

    I wish you every success.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:44 am on October 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Ignoring Iran’s crimes against humanity bolsters ayatollahs 

    By Soona Samsami

    For 40 days, 22 political prisoners staged a hunger strike in Gohardasht Prison in Karaj, 30 miles west of the Iranian capital of Tehran. Most are serving sentences for dubious political charges. In dire circumstances, they were only demanding their return back to bad conditions.

    Their health deteriorated; international intervention was literally non-existent, limited to a few expressions of concern, but no practical measures to compel the Iranian regime to stop its inhumane treatment of prisoners of conscience.

    Amnesty International’s Deputy Middle East and North Africa Director Magdalena Mughrabi said the protest “highlighted the urgent need for reforms to Iran’s cruel prison system.”

    In other words, the situation in Gohardasht reflected the much larger human rights crisis perpetuated by Iran’s clerical regime.

    There is an underlying need to use this situation, and the many others like it, as a jumping-off point to call international attention to the horror of conditions in which Iranian citizens might find themselves confined for years without ever having committing anything that the world would recognize as a crime.

    In addition, there’s a need to expose a past record of atrocities shocking in its horror and in the lack of international attention to it.

    This year’s United Nations General Assembly convened recently, and as in years past, was addressed by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. To no one’s surprise, Rouhani again portrayed criticism of Iran’s human rights record, including this year’s report by the U.N. special rapporteur on human rights in Iran, Asma Jahangir, as a Western conspiracy to discredit the Islamic theocracy.

    Meanwhile, Iranian citizens and human rights activists are increasingly calling for the perpetrators of massacres, past and present, to be brought to justice. Social media has become increasingly effective at circumventing the regime’s restrictions on free expression, but people are still routinely charged with crimes, even capital crimes, on the basis of something an intelligence agent found them saying on a banned platform like Facebook or Twitter.

    As Rouhani addressed the nations of the world, many U.N. delegates had prepared for his diatribe by reading an article published that same morning by the Wall Street Journal.

    Written by a young Iranian political activist and former political prisoner, the piece decried the regime’s efforts “to force Iranians to forget 1988,” the “summer of blood,” when  approximately 30,000 political prisoners, primarily activists of the main Iranian opposition movement, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI or MEK), were massacred in just a few months.

    They were condemned to death after “trials” lasting only a few minutes for dissent against the theocratic regime. As the young activist plaintively pointed out, “How could their families possibly forget?”

    The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), among others, has repeatedly called for an international inquiry, as the first step toward bringing charges against the key players for crimes against humanity.

    Some 30 years later, Secretary General Antonio Guterres appended a note to the special rapporteur’s report:

    “The families of the victims have a right to know the truth about these events and the fate of their loved ones without risking reprisal. They have the right to a remedy, which includes the right to an effective investigation of the facts and public disclosure of the truth; and the right to reparation,” he stated.

    Both U.N. officials acknowledged the 1988 massacre and subsequent “global denial” of it, but neither the secretary general, special rapporteur, nor any leading international official has yet to do anything practical to actually address that injustice or compensate for past neglect.

    As the United Nations Third Committee drafts its new resolution censuring human rights abuses in Iran, it should include a paragraph calling for the formation of an independent commission of inquiry into the 1988 massacre, with the aim of bringing the perpetrators to justice.

    The Iranian regime must not have a sense of impunity as it proceeds with its current crackdown on Iranian society, specifically in the prisons. If the world does not respond with one voice, that sense of impunity will only grow.

    Tehran must expect consequences for its ongoing crimes, fear consequences for future crimes and face consequences for crimes gone unpunished. Otherwise, the international community must share the stain of the blood on the hands of Tehran’s rulers.

    This is the message thousands of Iranians delivered to the United Nations during the Free Iran rally in protest to Rouhani’s presence on Sept. 20. It is the message Iran’s youth sends each day with their courageous defiance on social media. It is a message that deserves a response.

    Soona Soona Samsami is the representative in the United States for the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), which is dedicated to the establishment of a democratic, secular and non-nuclear republic in Iran.

    Source: Ignoring Iran’s crimes against humanity bolsters ayatollahs

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:29 am on September 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Vice-President of the European Parliament Strongly Condemns Appeasement Policies of E.P Towards Iran Regime 

    In a speech at the meeting of ‘the Friends of a Free Iran’ in European Parliament, on September 13, 2017. Mr Ryszard Czarneski Vice-President of the E.P once again reiterated his support for the Iranian resistance and its president elect Ms Maryam Rajavi, the following is the full text of his speech:

    Dear colleagues,

    Mr Chairman,

    Thank you very much for holding this important meeting today.

    I am very happy and honoured to have been a part of the Friends of a Free Iran group which has the support of hundreds of my colleagues in this parliament.

    Many of us in this group have different or even opposite views regarding domestic issues or about Europe, including my dear colleagues from Poland but we are all united in our hopes and dreams for a free Iran and in our support for the democratic opposition under the leadership of Mrs Maryam Rajavi.

    On Monday this week the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights said that “Iran continues to severely restrict freedom of opinion and expression.” He said “ill-treatment of prisoners is widespread, and the judiciary continues to sentence people to cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, including amputation of limbs and blinding.” He also stressed that “Iran remains the country with the highest reported rate of executions per capita. “

    I believe this is an important statement by the UN. It should be followed up by adopting tough policies against this religious dictatorship. As long as human rights violations continue in Iran, we can not have a normal relationship with this regime.

    We strongly condemn the current appeasement policies of Mrs Mogherini, who totally ignores repression against women in Iran but went to Iran to take part in the ceremony for Rouhani who does not even have one woman minister in his cabinet. And she keeps calling Rouhani a moderate !

    This policy of closing the eyes to human rights violations in Iran and ignoring the sufferings of the Iranian people, is a disgrace and cannot be done under our name.

    I am deeply concerned about the victims of the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran. Most of the victims were from the PMOI.

    Many of those criminals who were responsible for that massacre in summer of 1988, are still holding top positions in this regime. That includes the current minister of justice who happens to be also in the black list of the EU for human rights violations.

    So I wish to use this opportunity to give a message to the people of Iran that we in the European Parliament are with you and will support you to be free.

    Thank you very much.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:40 am on September 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Mass Graves of 1988 Massacre, , ,   

    Iran Regime Destroys the Graves of the Martyrs of PMOI/MEK Killed in the 1988 Massacre 

    While hundreds of international figures and lawyers have called for a trial of the regime’s leaders and the perpetrators of the massacre of members and sympathizers of PMOI/MEK in 1988, the Iran regime is trying to destroy the graves of MEK martyrs killed in this crime.

    According to the reports from various parts of Iran, the regime has been eliminating the signs of this MEK genocide in several cities including Ahvaz (southwestern Iran), Mashhad (northeast), Isfahan (center of Iran), Tabriz and Ardabil (northwestern), etc. They seek to destroy the mass graves of MEK members so that the families could not pay tribute to their loved ones the way they have been doing for years in various ways such as cementing the graves or removing the garbage and so on.

    The Iranian regime also destroyed the mass graves of MEK martyrs in Vadi-e Rahmat Cemetery of Tabriz under the pretext of carrying out construction projects. Moreover, the supporters of the MEK distributed the pictures and videos of grave destruction on the internet on June 23 2018. The news of such crime has been also posted in forms of pictures on Vadi-e Rahmat Cemetery Telegram Channel on September 11, 2017.

    As the Iran regime admitted, the construction project includes a total area of 4500 square meters. The procedures consist of excavating operations, rolling, leveling and fitting, pouring concrete, building walls, gridding, installing light pylons. Three companies and the Supervision of Tabriz Civil Engineering Department launched this project and the Cemetery Organization of Tabriz Municipality is the employer.

    As the satellite TV of the Iranian resistance, ‘Simay Azadi’ Channel released photos and videos on the destruction of graves, the Iranian regime also destroyed a MEK mass grave in Sowme’eh Sara, Gilan Province. One of the supporters of the MEK who visited this location, reports:

    “I went to the cemetery in which the MEK martyrs of the massacre of 1988 are buried. I took photos of the graves of townspeople but I could not find the graves of MEK martyrs. Nevertheless, I saw a mechanical excavator behind the cemetery amidst the tall trees where the MEK martyrs are buried. As the people said, this excavator is operating to make roads.”

    He added,” The cemetery of MEK martyrs is exactly located behind these tall trees, as the supporters of the MEK released pictures of this area. They are currently destroying the cemetery.” While a Justice Seeking movement is formed to try the perpetrators of the 1988 massacre of MEK and non MEK affiliates, the Iranian regime intends to eliminate the signs of such brutal crime.

    The Justice Seeking movement calls for the disclosure of secrets about the 1988 massacre, therefore, the perpetrators have to answer the following questions:

    1. The full name of MEK and non MEK affiliates who were executed.

    2. How many MEK and non MEK affiliates were killed in each city and province?

    3. The mothers of those executed shall know where their loved ones are buried and where the address of mass graves is.

    4. At the end, if these criminals are proud of such crime against the humanity, then why do not they reveal the names of the members of death committees in different provinces?

    It is noteworthy that in June this year a Call for urgent action to prevent destruction of 1988 massacre (mainly MEK members and sympathizers) evidence was made by Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran in which it stated:

    During the past few days the mullahs’ regime in the city of Tabriz, northwest Iran, has begun a campaign of vandalizing graves of members of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) executed back in the 1980s, especially those massacred during the summer of 1988. These now destroyed graves were in the Rahmat Valley Cemetery. To this point the graves of 75 MEK martyrs, including Akbar Choopani and Soraya Abolfat’hi, who was executed while pregnant, have been vandalized.

    Iranian intelligence has supervised measures placing 10 centimeters of cement and leveling the grounds in the cemetery to destroy all evidence of such a martyrs’ cemetery. They have also placed a sign reading, “Leveling the children’s block” and installed a number of gravestones in the area where the cement has been poured, to prevent any sign of the gravesite destruction. Attached images provide signs of the machinery used, the vandalized gravestone, and various phases of cement pouring and the placing of new gravestones.

    Last month in Mashhad, northeast Iran, mass graves of PMOI/MEK martyrs in the Beheshte Reza cemetery were also vandalized.

    In the city of Ahvaz, southwest Iran, city authorities have been widening a road near a cemetery in order to vandalize martyrs’ graves. Signs of tumbled bodies in a mass grave previously covered with cement were seen as the digging began in the area of phase 2 of Padadshahr and the Bankdar Boulevard in this city. Authorities quickly covered the mass grave with dirt and continued to widen the road.

    The Iranian Resistance calls on all international human rights organizations, especially the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Special Rapporteur of the Human Rights Situation in Iran to condemn this inhumane act and take urgent action to prevent the destruction of such evidence of previous mass executions and massacre of political prisoners mainly MEK members, especially those of 1988. Iran’s ruling dictators must face justice for their crimes against humanity and 120,000 political executions.

    Source: Iran Regime Destroys the Graves of the Martyrs of PMOI/MEK Killed in the 1988 Massacre

     
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