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  • Masoud Dalvand 7:38 pm on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , NCRI Women's Committee Monthly Report - November2017, Women's Sport   

    Iran: The Grim State of Women’s Sports 

    Women's report

    The Grim State of Women’s Sports

    Numerous reports emerged in November on wide-ranging issues and shed light on the abysmal conditions of women’s sports in Iran.

    No budget for women’s sports2

    Lack of financial support forced the women’s basketball team of Gorgan to refrain from participating in the cross-country games.

    Gorgan is the capital of the northern Iranian province of Golestan.

    The vice-president of the basketball delegation of Golestan said the team had 12 years of experience in professional sports. Soghra Mohebbi said, “The budget predicted for the participation of the women’s team in this tournament was 50 million toumans but no agency stepped forward to provide the budget for supporting the women’s team. One of their reasons was that the games are not broadcast by the national media so the private sector does not feel motivated to spend money on these games.” (The state-run radio and television news agency – November 17, 2016)

    The Pars Jonoubi Jam football team did not participate in the league in November due to lack of budget, and their game was easily cancelled.

    In October, the girls’ basketball team was removed from the Asian U16 games because of the Iranian federation’s $325K debt to FIBA. The team was to take part in the official event for the first time after 37 years. (The state-run ISNA news agency – October 21, 2017)

    No media coverage allowed on women’s games

    It is forbidden to broadcast women’s competitions in Iran.

    The women’s national futsal team, champion of Asia, hosted Italy’s team in Tehran on November 23 and 24, 2017, while no photographers or cameramen were allowed in the stadium.

    The only picture was taken at the end of the games in an empty stadium while Italian players had to cover their hair with pink shawls. (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 24, 2017)

    No job security for female coaches3

    The head coach of the women’s national futsal team complained of lack of job security. In reaction to the Football Federation’s objection, Shahrzad Mozaffar said, “If my contract was for 50% of male coaches’ contracts, I would confidently concentrate on the national team. If I have job security, I will stay with the team.  But if I quit my other job today as head coach of a club team, I would not have job security and a stable income.” (The state-run IRNA – November 23, 2017)

    No adequate place for the games

    Some of the teams participating in the Futsal League had not been allocated a field where they could play.

    The fields where the games took place were peppered with holes and ditches making it impossible for the players to dribble.

    It was also reported that the restrooms and locker facilities were not adequate for the teams to get ready for the game. (Iranwire news agency – November 3, 2017)

    The Vice-President of Women’s Basketball, Fatemeh Karamzadeh, said the absence of a basketball court for women is a real predicament for women’s basketball. “In a country that so much underlines gender segregation in sports, women do not have even one court to play their games,” Karamzadeh admitted. (The state-run ISNA news agency, November 1, 2017)

    No medical support for injured players4

    Zeinab Karimi, footballer of the Kheibar women’s team of Khorramabad (capital of Lorestan Province in western Iran), experienced an inhuman treatment after being injured in the field and suffering a dislocated shoulder.

    In an interview about her injury during the third week of women’s Football League she said, “I was injured in the 20thminute of the game. I remained suffering from pain beside the field until the end of the first half of the game. The supervisor did not even turn an eye on me. The ambulance driver came to me, but when I asked him to quickly take me to the hospital, he answered that ‘the supervisor does not allow this. Since you are not bleeding, we do not have permission to transfer you to hospital.’ After a while, I was taken to hospital by someone’s car.” “I waited for four hours in the hospital before being attended to because I had not been transferred by an ambulance. They did not even give me a chair to sit,” she lamented. (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 5, 2017)

    Violation of FIFA universal rules

    The Iranian Football Federation briefed the teams participating in the Women’s Football League that players would be shown the yellow card if they do not properly cover all their hair during the games. If repeated, they would be shown the red card and sent off the field.

    Female champions are abandoned1

    Atousa Abbasi, a bronze medal winner in the Asian Bicycling Race and a record holder in women’s speed cycling in Iran, had to peddle in the streets for a while due to financial problems. She has been deprived of participating in cycling tournaments due to breaches made by her husband who is a cycling coach. (The state-run Mashreq website – October 18, 2017)

    Sousan Rashidi, who has been the champion of women’s kick boxing for eleven terms, is now training under difficult conditions for foreign tournaments. She is a nomad girl living in Kermanshah (western Iran). Due to poverty and lack of government support, she has to work in the village from early in the morning. She has to bake bread, take the sheep for grazing, bring log wood, etc. (The state-run Fararu website – October 18, 2017)

    Ms. Rashidi says, “Some days, I did not have my transportation fare to go for training. Sometimes, if I were given some money to buy an egg to eat, I saved the money to pay for my transportation.”

    “I became a champion for nine terms, but I did not receive any prize for these victories,” she added. (The state-run ISNA news agency – December 26, 2016)

    Rock climber Elnaz Rekabi won the gold medal of women’s Asian Bold Ring Cup. (The state-run ISCAnews.ir – October 29, 2017)

    In a short interview, she also complained about the difficulties of training without any government backing while being alone in her field. She said, “In Iran, I am very lonely. No one is ahead of me and they do not let me practice with boys.”

    Elnaz Rekabi also spoke on the problems created by the requirement of wearing the compulsory veil. “It is very hard with the veil especially when the weather is hot. I tried to find some proper outfit for this sport to observe the dress code, as well, but I had to do it on my own.” (Interview with Euronews – Aparat.com– April 25, 2016)

    Talented athletes drain

    Horrible conditions for female athletes has led many to leave the country.5

    Dorsa Derakhshani who had been banned from the Iranian national chess team for attending the February 2017 international competition in Gibraltar without wearing the mandatory veil, has joined the U.S. team.

    Dorsa Derakhshani was awarded the titles Woman Grandmaster and International Master at the age of 18 by the World Chess Federation in 2016. She had taken part in several international competitions without covering her hair.

    Dorsa moved to Spain in 2015 after she received an invitation by a chess club that also supported her studies. (The state-run ISNA news agency – October 2, 2017)

    Faezeh Kazemi, Handball player from Qazvin Province, joined the Metropolitan team in Turkey in late November.

    Ban on women’s presence in sports stadiums

    Iranian women were refused entry to the World Cup football match that took place on September 5, 2017, at Tehran’s Azadi Stadium between the national teams of Syria and Iran.6

    The Guardian wrote, “Syrian women are allowed into stadium but Iranian women are kept out, despite initially being allowed to buy tickets… A group of women who went to Tehran’s gigantic Azadi stadium were told they could not enter. When they started demonstrating they were threatened with arrest.”

    The State Security forces expelled three young women who were attempting to enter Azadi Stadium to watch the football match between the two most prominent Iranian football teams.

    The incident took place on October 26, 2017, when Persepolis and Esteghlal teams were scheduled to face off. The female fans had donned men’s clothes in a bid to enter the stadium. (The state-run Rokna.ir– October 26, 2017)

    Shahindokht Molaverdi, Rouhani’s Deputy for Citizen’s Rights Affairs, had recently admitted that the conditions are not yet prepared for women’s presence in football stadiums. (The state-run Entekhab website – October 25, 2017)

    The Iranian regime’s ban on entry of women to stadiums was also noted by the UN Special Rapporteur on human rights on Iran. In Article 92 of her report, she wrote:

    Women continue to be banned from watching sporting events in stadiums, and several female athletes have been restricted from participation in international tournaments either by State sporting agencies or by their husbands.

    She also noted in her report that in March, a number of Iranian female billiard players were banned from competitions, allegedly for “violating the Islamic code of conduct.”

    In April, female participants in an international marathon held in Tehran were required to run separately from men and on a shortened route.”

    Khamenei and religious scholars weigh in

    Religious scholars also underlined the prohibition of women’s entry to sports stadiums.

    “The issue was tabled by the previous government but the Supreme Leader and other religious authorities opposed it,” stated Mullah Makarem Shirazi and added, “It is a deviation to bring up this issue, again.” (The state-run ISNA news agency – November 29, 2017)

    Mullah Nouri Hamedani also tried to justify the ban by saying, “It is not permissible for men and women to be present in the same sports event because women cannot properly hold their veil.” (The state-run Razavi news agency – November 29, 2017)

    The mullahs’ supreme leader Ali Khamenei also underlined the ban on women’s bicycling in public. Under the pretext of responding to religious questions, he reiterated, “Women’s bicycling in public areas and in places that could be seen by strange men is not allowed.” (The state-run ILNA news agency – November 26, 2017)7

    The above facts which are a handful from a ton, show the numerous obstacles created by Iran’s ruling regime to exclude women from the sports arena. They also help one realize that Iran’s women are not only talented but really hard working and motivated to show their competence at every opportunity despite lack of any form of government support.

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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:47 pm on December 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Amb. Kenneth Blackwell on Iran Human Rights, Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners. 

    In a panel on December 1, 2017 at the National Press Club by the Washington Office of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI-US), human rights experts called for accountability for Iranian regime’s human rights abuses. Referring to NCRI’s newly released book, “Iran, Where Mass Murderers Rule, The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities,” former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Kenneth Blackwell, called for accountability into the 1988 massacre to “put pressure on the regime to give access so that we might shine light on the evils that were done… [to give] hope to [those] inside Iran.” Blackwell added, “our delegation at the U.N. [should] continue to be a leading voice, not only on international terrorism…by the regime, but …to bring justice to a regime … that is a threat to the basic fabric of humanity across the globe.” Former Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, Linda Chavez, referred to the role of women in the opposition. “It is no accident,” that Iran’s opposition movement “is led by a woman, Madame Maryam Rajavi. She stands as a real affront to this regime. The regime hates and fears the MEK [Mujahedin-e Khalq] because in the MEK women … are allowed to lead others. And men are willing to listen and to follow them; a major threat to a regime that wants to imprison half its people.” NCRI’s U.S. Representative, Soona Samsami said, “why the regime continues to perpetrate such atrocities and continuing? The answer is simple; it fears its population. Despite harsh crackdown, Tehran has been unable to extinguish the Iranian people’s yearning for change, freedom, and human rights.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg emphasized, “The violation of human rights has become an inconvenient truth to those who have decided that the Iran nuclear agreement is what begins and ends our engagement with Iran… We need to begin holding Iran accountable.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain, Adam Ereli, said, “Many of the perpetrators of this crime are in positions of high authority and this has produced a culture of impunity that Iran’s rulers exploit to continue arresting, torturing, and murdering at will and without consequences or penalty… The only way to stop rogue regimes from using terror and murder as tools of their rule is to hold them accountable for their crimes.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:23 am on December 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Biggest Threat to Iran’s Regime Is a Tolerant Islam 

    Rally for a Free Iran

    This is a comprehensive and great article about Iran regime’s challenges inside and outside of Iran. Especially if you want to get to know the biggest threat to this regime, that is, tolerant Islam, which is symbolized in its democratic opposition, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI)and the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) under the leadership of Maryam Rajavi, this article will help you to understand Get that.

     
    The Iranian Regime has been facing a range of ever-increasing political and military challenges in the Middle East, particularly the US’s tougher policy on confronting Iranian belligerence and expansionism, but the biggest threat to the Regime is a challenge to its extremist interpretation of Islam, according to a leading Iranian-American political scientist.
    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh, president of the International American Council, wrote an op-ed for the Huffington Post in which he laid out how ideological challenges to the Iranian Regime were destroying its chokehold on power.
    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh wrote: “Since the 1979 founding of the Islamic Republic, the Iranian regime’s main weapon has been the demented interpretation of Islam, based on zero-tolerance for other religions, lack of respect of freedoms and the debasing of women. This ideology manifests itself as misogynistic laws and practices, a record number of executions, and brutal torture of its own citizens. Tehran has used this extremist ideology to suppress freedom and democracy at home and wreak havoc in neighboring countries. This has rendered sectarian violence triggered by Iran’s Shiite surrogates in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, and Yemen, among others, to rampant levels. In a nutshell, the Iranian regime’s extremist ideology has been its shield and armour against foreign and domestic threats. That armour, however, is increasingly showing wear and tear.”
    Thankfully, the fanatical interpretation of Islam- which disrespects women and people of other religions- is on its way out. Just last week Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman reaffirmed his promise to reverse Islamic extremism, largely orchestrated by the Regime that has led to groups like ISIS and Hezbollah.
    The Regime, of course, even as written evidence of their collaboration with Al Qaeda emerges from the CIA is trying to shift the blame to Saudi Arabia because they disapprove of Prince Salman’s efforts to push back against Iranian sectarianism.
    The Regime also disapproves of Prince Salman’s accurate description of Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei as “the new Hitler of the Middle East”.

    Resistance

    Another challenge to the Iranian Regime’s fanatical version of Islam comes from the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), a coalition of Iranian opposition groups including the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK).
    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh wrote: “The NCRI [is] in every way an antithesis to the ruling clerics of Iran, and vies for the establishment of a secular and democratic state providing equal opportunities to all its citizens, regardless of faith, gender and ethnicity.”
    The NCRI’s popularity- both inside and outside Iran- has been steadily growing. Prior to the rigged Iranian elections in May, Iranians publically posted pictures of NCRI president Maryam Rajavi and accompanied that with calls for the overthrow of the Regime, while many international politicians have voiced their support for the Resistance.

    Thousands of Iranian in Rally for Free Iran -20 Sept 2017

    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh cited a Washington Examiner piece which read: “In the past year, Sen. John McCain, a separate U.S. Senate delegation, and several other prominent U.S. politicians have met with MEK’s leadership in Tirana, Albania, where the group’s members relocated to from Iraq in 2016, and voiced their support for MEK’s goals to establish freedom and democracy in Iran.”
    This scared the Regime, who know that their rule is all but over.
    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh explained: “Iran’s rulers are attempting to stem the tide of support directed toward the NCRI and MEK by spreading false news and propaganda in Iran and western countries.
    An article recently published by Massoud Khodabandeh, a British-Iranian with reportedly known ties to the Islamic Republic, seeks to dissuade people outside Iran from supporting the MEK by portraying an image based on non-existent and insubstantial facts.”
    Yet again, Iran, attempts to shift blame onto another party for problems that they cause but in the case of the Resistance, the Regime goes much further.
    Dr. Majid Rafizadeh explained: “The Iranian regime has sought in vain to eradicate the opposition through violence according to Amnesty International and human rights groups. Since 1981, the regime executed more than 100,000 MEK members and supporters, including the 1988 mass murder of 30,000 political prisoners. It has nonetheless been unsuccessful in uprooting them.”
    Thankfully, the Regime’s cruel rule is almost over and there will be no pardons for the guilty. They will be held to account for their crimes.
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:59 am on December 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Congressman Tom Garrett discussing newly published Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    December 6, 2017–During a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing, Representative Tom Garrett of Virginia decried the atrocities committed by the current Iranian regime, whose creation he described as leading to “bloodshed on a scale not seen in that region for years.” Raising the recently released NCRI-US book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule, Garrett spoke on the 1988 massacre of political prisoners ordered by Ruhollah Khomeini. He emphasized that any radicalization of a religion that promotes intolerance should be vehemently opposed not only by the United States, but internationally as well.

    Representative Garrett condemning radical Islam while holding Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule.

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule is the latest book released by the NCRI-US office. It focuses on the 1988 massacre during which in a matter of months the Iranian regime systematically executed 30,000 political prisoners, mainly members of the main opposition movement, the People’s Mojahedin (MEK). The perpetrators of that massacre are currently in key positions of power in Iran, including the Justice Minister in Hassan Rouhani’s cabinet. For more information regarding the 1988 massacre, please explore the NCRI-US website which is ncrius dot org.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:45 pm on December 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Regime Change, US Policy on Iran, US Senate   

    Maryam Rajavi: Message to the US Senate conference-The new U.S. policy on Iran 

     

    Message to the US Senate conference-The new U.S. policy on Iran:The Way Forward -December 7, 2017

    Maryam Rajavi: Regime Change Is Within Reach and Iranian People Are Capable of Realizing It.

    For watching the conference please click on the below link:
     
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:48 am on December 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    European Lawmakers Condemn Human Rights Violations in Iran, Express Support for Iranian Democratic Opposition 

    Maryam Rajavi's speech at the European Parliament on the eve of

    Press release by the Friends of a Free Iran inter-group at the European Parliament- Brussels- 6 December 2017 

    On Wednesday, 6 December 2017, on the initiative of the Friends of a Free Iran inter-group at the European Parliament, which enjoys the support of several hundred MEPs from various political groups, a conference on the occasion of the International Human Rights Day was held at the European Parliament in Brussels. The key note speaker was Maryam Rajavi, the President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI). Dozens of MEPs and a large number of parliamentary assistants, diplomats and journalists were present. The Scottish veteran politician Struan Stevenson was also one of the guest speakers.

    Gérard Deprez, Belgian MEP (ALDE) who chaired the conference said: “We call on the EU, especially the High Representative Mogherini to put human rights and women rights first when dealing with Iran. We are bitterly disappointed of her approach who is just obsessed and occupied with the nuclear deal or encouraging western companies to go to Iran. We urge her and also urge our European governments, including my own government in Belgium, to condition relations with Iran to a suspension of executions and a clear progress on human rights.”

    Maryam Rajavi said: “The regime has already exhausted its strategic resources. Economically, they are on the verge of bankruptcy. Socially, they have become ever more isolated. They failed in their strategy of destroying their main opposition and could not prevent the relocation of PMOI members out of Camp Liberty prison in Iraq.”

    Maryam Rajavi's speech at the European Parliament on the eve of

    Mrs Rajavi added that in such circumstances, the regime has two means of survival: more suppression and executions in Iran and stepping up its meddling abroad. This reflects the regime’s major internal crisis which it tries to cover up by expanding its influence in the region. Indeed, it seeks to put up a hollow show of force to discourage the international community from adopting a decisive policy against it.

    The regime’s leaders explicitly say Syria, Iraq and Yemen are the regime’s strategic depth and if they wrap up and leave those countries they would risk being overthrown. She reiterated, “As long as the international community fails to hold this regime accountable for its destructive behaviour, the mullahs will carry on with their dangerous adventures. The solution is showing firmness, not giving concessions. The EU has unfortunately abandoned its values in order to promote trade with the mullahs. It has turned a blind eye on the gross violations of human rights in Iran.”

    Ryszard Czarnecki, Vice-President of the European Parliament, said: “As long as executions continue in Iran, as long as freedom of speech is repressed in Iran, as long as religious minorities including Christians and Sunni Muslims are repressed in Iran, we cannot and we must not have a normal relation with this regime. Our informal group, Friends of a Free Iran, has always said that in our relations with Iran, Europe must put human rights first. We must not compromise on this.” He added: “The Iranian opposition is really feared by the Iranian regime which spends lot of energy and millions of euros against the democratic opposition under the leadership of Mrs Rajavi.”

    The members of European Parliament condemned the systematic human rights abuses in Iran, the regime’s ballistic missile projects and meddling and warmongering in the region. Many expressed support for Mrs Rajavi’s 10-point platform for a future Iran. The MEPs reiterated the following:

    1. Europe must not turn a blind eye to the widespread human rights violations in Iran. Trips to Tehran by European officials and MEPs are in practice to the benefit of the human rights violators in Iran.

    2. The regime’s record of executions, torture and murders over the past 38 years and in particular the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in 1988 must be referred to the United Nations Security Council, and the officials of the regime and those responsible for these crimes must be held accountable.

    3. All signs suggest that the Iranian regime is facing widespread crises. The Iranian people have shown through repeated protests that they seek regime change. It is high time for the European Union to side with the Iranian people in their legitimate desire to achieve democratic change. Recognizing the NCRI is essential for ending and compensating for the previous catastrophic policies. Experience has shown that this regime is unable to reform.

    4. The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) controls the main part of Iran’s economy. The IRGC has brought starvation and poverty to the Iranian people and it is responsible for the massacre of the peoples of Syria, Iraq and Yemen. All economic deals with the IRGC and its affiliated companies must be halted, and it must be blacklisted. It is vital to expel the IRGC and its mercenary militias from the region.

    The MEPs called on the EU High Representative to base any relations with Iran on an improvement of the human rights situation, halt to executions and an end to its meddling in neighbouring countries and its ballistic missile program; otherwise such relations would run counter to Europe’s values and to peace and stability in the region and the world.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:38 am on December 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Panel Calls for Accountability Against Iran Rulers for Massacre of Political Prisoners 

    NCRI US

    Washington, DC- 1 December 2017- A panel of experts was organized by the National Council of Resistance of Iran, U.S. Representative Office (NCRI-US) to discuss the situation of human rights in Iran, and U.S. policy regarding it. The panel coincided with the release of a new well-documented book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule: The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities. The event was held at the National Press Club a week ahead of Human Rights Day and highlighted the need to designate certain Iranian officials as major human rights violators subject to sanctions. The panel began with an introduction from former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain and panel moderator, Adam Ereli. Soona Samsami, the U.S. Representative of NCRI delivered her remarks on the significance of the book, “because it is not only intended to commemorate the past, but to draw attention to the present as well as the future. [It explains that] every day, new blood from a new Iranian citizen is spilled at the hands of an inhumane, corrupt, regime… these hands, however, are the same hands today as they were thirty years ago.” Samsami continued to say “the way forward certainly involves holding the regime accountable for not only its past crimes against humanity, but its current violations as well.” Linda Chavez, former Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, who was also former U.S. Expert elected by the United Nations Human Rights Commission to the U.N. Sub-commission on the Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities drew on her experience of dealing with the Iranian opposition since decades ago when the group was providing information to the United Nations in Geneva and emphasized that there is bi-partisan consensus on the need to condemn the regime and hold the rulers accountable for their crimes. Chavez discussed the current Iranian regime’s treatment of women. “We have a society in Iran in which it would be an understatement to say half of the population are regarded as second-class citizens. Women in Iran are not even given the rights of second-class citizens… One of the reasons I think the regime hates and fears the MEK is because women are allowed to be in leadership positions.” The Honorable J. Kenneth “Ken” Blackwell, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, talked on how the Iran regime can and should be confronted. “I think, if in fact, we keep the pressure as part of the comprehensive pressure that we put on the regime, we can help bring closure to the families of the victims of the summer of blood in 1988… It is incumbent upon us as individuals, us as nation states, and as communities of nation states, to put the pressure on the regime to give access to the community so that we may shine light – individual light, collective light – on the evils that were done by the regime.” With conviction in his voice, Blackwell continued. “We want to demand that our delegation at the UN continues to be leading voice… not only on the threats to national terrorism that is perpetuated by and advanced by the regime… but we in fact want to bring justice to those human rights fighters who in fact have the experience of a brutal history… where people who were just passing out leaflets in 1988 were part of the human victims of a regime that is dark, that is anti-human rights, and that is a threat to the basic fabric of humanity across the globe.” Closing the panel was former Ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg. His words called on his own political party, the Democrats, to act on their values of freedom and equality. “If anything, we Democrats should be champions of holding Iran accountable!” Touching on the current focus of the party, he demanded that to “expand the debate about Iran. It is not merely the issue of the Iran nuclear agreement, it is its violation as a state sponsor of terror.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:03 pm on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Join us LIVE at our panel discussion for our newest book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    Iran where mass murderers rule- ncri us

    Join us LIVE at our panel discussion for our newest book, Iran:

    Where Mass Murderers Rule.

    This week’s comes from the ‘s new publication, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule: The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities.

    Iran where mass murderers rule- ncri us 2

    Panelists :

    Panelists NCRI-US-2

    Click on the follow link for watching all conference:

    Iran- where mass murderers rule

     US-National Press Club- Washington D.C. Panel to Discuss Iran Dec 1 2017
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:25 am on November 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Crown prince of Saudi Arabia, , , New Hitler,   

    Iran Regime’s Khamenei Is Modern Hitler 

    New Hitler

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – No one should use the term ‘modern-day Hitler’ lightly. Hitler was responsible for one of the worst genocides in the 20th century and when most people compare modern politicians to him, they are trivialising that.

    However, there is one leader to whom that comparison applies without a shadow of a doubt: Ali Khamenei, Supreme Leader of Iran.

    In a recent New York Times interview, Saudi Arabia’s crown prince Mohammad bin Salman not only called the Iranian regime’s top mullah, “the new Hitler of the Middle East” but also warned that, as we saw from former British PM Neville Chamberlain, “appeasement doesn’t work”.

    Prince Mohammad noted that the last thing anyone wants is for Iran to repeat the actions of Nazi Germany across the Middle East.

    The problem is that the Iranian Regime is already repeating history, as many Iranian dissidents, human rights groups, and families of political prisoners have long reported.

    Prince Mohammad comparison of Khamenei to Hitler is not extreme, it’s not shocking, and the most newsworthy thing about it is that some people fail to see the similarities.

    • Dictator hell bent on controlling the world even if it means ruining their country in the meantime? Check.

    • Oppressing and imprisoning religious and ethnic minorities? In Shiite Iran, minorities such as the Baha’i, Kurds, Christians and Sunnis are routinely oppressed.

    • Secret Police to enforce security at home and abroad? This would be the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps and its paramilitary branch, the Quds Force

    • Taking control of other nation states under the pretext of fighting a foreign enemy? For Khamenei, it is the proxy control of Yemen and Syria in order to expel ISIS.

    • Taking control of all news media and turning it into propaganda? Since President Rouhani came to power hundreds of journalists have been imprisoned, tortured and even executed.

    • Able to gain appeasement from the West through a maligned deal aimed at curbing their ability to wage war? This would be the 2015 Iran nuclear deal

    It is now time to confront the mullahs for their destabilizing behaviour, especially now that Iran had threatened to launch ballistic missiles against Europe after receiving criticism from the French President Emmanuel Macron.

    Laura Carnahan wrote: “The irony of Iran’s actions to Hitler’s speeches to blaming its enemies for driving Germany into the ground in the aftermath of World War I is striking and serves as a reminder that repeating the mistakes of the 1930s today will only lead down a path of regional conflict and even more suffering for the Iranian people.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:09 pm on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    IranMassMurderers-cover

    The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule offers a glimpse into both the past and present atrocities committed by the Iranian regime. The book, published by the National Council of Resistance of Iran U.S. Representative Office (NCRI-US), examines Iran’s bloody history of political executions perpetrated by members of the government. Most importantly, it connects the horrors of the past with those of the present day, and sheds light on the lack of awareness and justice regarding these wrongdoings.

    The most infamous of these executions occurred in 1988, when Ayatollah Khomeini issued a fatwa ordering the killing of all people associated with the main Iranian opposition group, the Mujahedin-e-Khalq (MEK). This order included political prisoners that had already served their sentences, and the victims were given “trials” that lasted only minutes before their fate was decided for them. In total, around 30,000 political prisoners, mostly MEK members and associates, were executed over a period of five months as a result of the regime’s campaign to eliminate its political opponents. Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule describes in detail these horrific events, and includes a firsthand account from a victim who managed to escape his fate. The book also provides a unique unveiling of the evidence against members of the regime that participated in the killings of 1988, and identifies guilty officials that remain in power today. In fact, this latest publication from NCRI-US catalogues statements from Iranian regime officials in which they acknowledge their participation in or fully endorse the “summer of blood.” In doing so, it effectively reveals to the world that these officials have admitted their roles as mass murderers, and yet have not been held accountable.

    Along with calling for justice in Iran for the crimes of the past, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule details the multitude of political executions in Iran today. Iran has the world’s highest rate of executions per capita, and also remains the only country on the planet that executes juveniles. The book chronicles some of the recent political killings in Iran, and also includes the resulting outcry from important entities, such as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Amnesty International. It sheds light on the current state of human rights in Iran, presents the United Nations’ statements and findings regarding these issues, and provides informed advice on how Iran and the rest of the world should proceed on the long road to justice. Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule produces a unique perspective of the Iranian regime and the officials that constitute it, offering never-before-seen evidence regarding the government’s true human rights record and concrete policy suggestions regarding the way forward.

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule, published by the National Council of Resistance of Iran-U.S. Representative Office, is currently available for purchase on Amazon.

     
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