Updates from April, 2018 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:03 am on 17 Apr 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Syria is a shadow, the main goal is the Iranian regime 

    Syria is a shadow, the main goal is the Iranian regime 2

    The bombs and missiles, which were launched on April 14th to Bashar al-Assad’s chemical production and distribution centers, seem to have been hit politically to the Mullahs regime. Because some of the Iranian regime’s agents and analysts acknowledge that all the forces that support Bashar al-Assad today in Syria invited by Mullahs regime there, (Russia, Hezbollah Lebanon and other terrorist troops in Syria)

    Syria is a shadow, the main goal is the Iranian regime

    On the other hand, although Russia is currently the first force in Syria, the preservation of Bashar al-Assad, unlike the clerical regime of Iran, is not strategic for Russia.

    This is why the Mullahs regime’s response to this attack is so hysterical and horrific, as Khamenei himself immediately came to the scene and reacted against it.

    Afterwards, we witnessed a massive propaganda campaign and a huge amount of comments from the authorities and the regime’s media.

    In reaction to the attacks on Bashar al-Assad and the Mullahs regime’s interests in these attacks, Khamenei deceptively said that “Their purpose of these attacks is not to hit Syria, Iraq or Afghanistan. but they want blow to the Islamic nation and Islam”. (Iran state TV, April 14, 2018) It is clear that the Islamic nation and Islam and such words in the culture of Mullahs rule are the pseudonym of the corrupt regime of Velayat-e faqih.

    One of the agents of Khamenei’s gang, Saadallah Zarei, says, “Syria is a shadow, the main goal is the Iranian regime” says National Security Advisor John Bolton.

    While pointing to the role of the national security adviser in the attack, Khamenei’s gang member acknowledged that since the Iran regime plays a key role in keeping President Bashar al-Assad governed in rule and even “everyone in Syria today is in defense of the people! and their government” They are invited to by Iran “(Fars News Agency, April 14). So, the target of the attack has been Iran regime.

    Hermidas Bavand, a former diplomat, also asked the regime to “go beyond” with the question “What was the message of the American invasion to Syria?”

    While expressing dismay at Russia’s lack of action and the fact that Russia “will not do anything other than verbal sentencing”. It does not take any other action from the verb condemnation and does not react “to the extent that it condemns or rightly states that it will make Syria’s future more difficult and prolonged.”

    Another former ambassador to the regime, Qadiri Abyaneh, also said that “the ultimate goal of the United States, Britain and France of attack on Syria was to confront the Iran,” as they intended to “block the Hezbollah as a prelude to confronting Iran. In fact, the ultimate goal of the West was to confront Iran has been »

    Mehdi Motahrania, a member of the Rouhani gang, warns in fear of the consequences of attacking the chemical facilities of Bashar al-Assad in Syria: “We have to keep our hat tight, so that it does not hurl us out of our heads, and we strengthen our foundations so hard and so close to us.” If the tornado comes cannot take us out of the ground. We have to make the most of our efforts to get out of this conflict. ”

    As the comments from the members of both gangs come up, the fact is that after Bashar al-Assad, this Mullahs regime is a major loser to attacking the chemical facilities of Bashar al-Assad.

    For many times, the international community has emphasized that Iranian regime is the source of many conflicts in the countries of the region and should stop interfering in Syria and interfering in the internal affairs of other countries in the region.

    The United States Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, at the Security Council meeting, explicitly called the actions of the Iranian regime in countries like Syria and Yemen as the source of human tragedies from military conflicts in the Middle East, adding that the Mullahs regime is the source of destabilizing measures that are almost entirely in the Middle East has spread.

     

    It now seems that it’s time that this regime, which has been “The wind was planting” for years with its evil presence in the region, is now “Now the storm will reap”, as Mehdi Motahrania, a gangs’ member of Mullahs regime, acknowledged “a storm has raged in the region, and the possibility The incidence of whirlwind has increased “and is in the horror of the storm, which recommends the regime to” change in different dimensions “and is ready to drink the next poison cups.

     

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    • wizzymedpower 2:20 pm on 18 Apr 2018 Permalink

      Thanks for your update… God’s intervention

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 11:20 pm on 19 Apr 2018 Permalink

      While I see the reason for some to be excited over the US’s actions, chemical weapons are horrid and disgusting, one has to consider some things. The US has been using white phosphorus in Syria, fairly indiscriminately. So why are they taking such a hard stance on chemical weapons now? I sincerely hope that bombing those places helped the Syrian people but Donald Trump is at the helm and not noted for his humanitarianism. I wager those bombs helped him most of all and any aid to the people was nothing short of serendipitous. I ave seen the news of what happens when short-sighted people have decided that burning a crop of marijuana was the best way to dispose of it and ended up getting the town(s) downwind stoned. So I must ask, what happens when the chemicals in those plants gets incinerated?

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 8:10 am on 20 Apr 2018 Permalink

      Thanks for comment dear Danielle. Your comments are always interesting to me because they are accompanied by a sense of human responsibility. I have a few points about your opinion. There are some obvious facts beyond of reasons for US and Tramp bombardment of Assad’s military and chemical centers. First, all the relief groups in Syria and the locals who were attacked by Assad chemically welcomed the military invasion of Assad’s chemical centers. Because global powers have been basically talking about the crimes of the bloodthirsty dictator of Syria and its criminal supporters, namely, Khamenei and Putin, over the past seven years. So when Syrian people see countries such as the United States, France and the United Kingdom just show a few practical responses to Assad, they are happy. Finally, one has found the answer to this dictator. Why are these people, especially the children and women of Syria, who should be bombarded by Assad? Once again, let the military centers of the dictator be targeted. I do not make any comment on the intentions of the Trump or the leaders of France and England. They certainly have their own interests and not humanitarian goals, but the result of their work in this world of oppression and crime that we see is the massacre in Syria, and for seven years nobody helps them important for us. Yes, the important thing is that even for the contradiction of the interests of the superpowers, the United States and its allies engage in a reaction to the crimes of the bloodthirsty dictator of Syria. Also this applies about our people in Iran and oppression and religious tyranny that has been imposed on our people for 40 years, is right. And finally, Obama much appeased with Mullahs and gave them a lot of money just to achieve a very weak nuclear deal. So dear Danielle, in a world full of injustice to rid the oppressed people of the massacres and the repression and crimes that dictators do against them, we welcome any action that the Western powers are taking against these dictators. Be sure, we know the intentions of the powerful countries. But let them do it if they can target the dictators, and we also thank them. Our intentions are just the freedom and establishment of democracy and human rights in the countries of this region of the world, where Khamenei’s and ISIS’s savagery crimes continue against our people. Thank you so much again because you are a great woman and a great poet with great human emotions.

      Like

    • bluemoone 8:23 am on 20 Apr 2018 Permalink

      You’re welcome Masoud. I think that’s the most you have ever said to me at once. 😊 I am happy if the U.S. actions helped. The people of the U.S. want to see things get better for the people of Syria and Iran. I still remain suspicious of Trump’s motives and don’t see him being effective for the people for long. He has tried 3 times to ban Iranian people from the U.S., even the legal citizens. I know Trump and Putin have interest in Syria’s oil. I’d say that is why he took action. It’s Iraq all over again. I know the people of Syria and Iran are in an impossible situation and it’s an enemy-of-my-enemy situation for them. My heart is with them and we are working hard here to change things for the better so that we have good people with good intentions in office. I would just caution people to remember who Trump truly is and not to sing his praises too much or too loud. The devil may be your friend today, but he’s still the devil.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 8:48 am on 20 Apr 2018 Permalink

      I’m happy too Danielle to read your comments, we have same opinion about people’s interests in every where. Thanks again.

      Like

    • bluemoone 2:58 am on 21 Apr 2018 Permalink

      Yes, we do Masoud. That was a great article. Very strong writing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 4:55 am on 21 Apr 2018 Permalink

      My pleasure

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 11:16 am on 22 Apr 2018 Permalink

      This is your positive opinion about me, because I know my English is not strong!

      Like

    • oldpoet56 9:53 pm on 15 May 2018 Permalink

      Excellent article, I enjoyed the read so I am going to reblog this article for you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • oldpoet56 9:53 pm on 15 May 2018 Permalink

      Reblogged this on Truth Troubles.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 3:33 pm on 16 May 2018 Permalink

      Appreciate!

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 3:34 pm on 16 May 2018 Permalink

      Thanks so much dear friend for sharing.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 11:01 am on 4 Mar 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Houthis, , , ,   

    Iran Regime Lies About Arming Houthis 

    The Iranian Regime is once again lying about its involvement in the Yemeni war, which has caused thousands of deaths and triggered a humanitarian crisis; just days after Russia vetoed a UN Security Council resolution that would have condemned Iran for supplying the Yemeni Houthis with weapons and missiles, in violation of an arms embargo.

    Bahram Qassemi, a spokesman for the Iranian Foreign Ministry, outright denied that Iran sent weapons to Yemen and accused the UK of “dishonest behaviour” for drafting the resolution.

    He said: “We don’t send weapons to Yemen. Such allegations and attempts are made to project the blame on others by those who want to use the existing situation against Iran. We are witnessing a [sic] dishonest behaviour from the British government that uses the international mechanisms to defend the aggressor despite its slogans about a peaceful settlement of the Yemen crisis.”

    He went on to claim that the situation in Yemen “is the result of the export of British and American arms”, but it is notable that UN experts have completed a report that found Iran was supplying military aid to the Houthis.

    It’s not a coincidence that these comments came just days after General Joseph Votel, head of the US Central Command in the Middle East, told the House Armed Services Committee that Iran was trying to turn Yemen into a client state, as it did with Lebanon, but in a much shorter timeframe.

    Votel said: “Iran has extended its tentacles across the region through numerous proxies, including Lebanese Hezbollah operating in multiple countries, hardline Iranian-backed Shia militia groups (SMGs) in Iraq and Syria, and Iranian support has enabled the Houthis.”

    This is not surprising when you listen to the recent comments of Ali Akbar Velayati, a foreign policy adviser to Iran’s supreme leader Ali Khamenei.

    Velayati said: “Our presence in the region is inevitable. We will continue this process, so as to become the most decisive force in the region. We are present in Iraq, Syria, Palestine, and Lebanon…We help Yemen because it is our human duty to do so. Saudi Arabia must know that this ongoing process will make Yemen its Vietnam.”

    In this, Velayati is admitting that Iran deceives its enemies, when others claim that they are not building a coalition of Shiite forces in Syria and Iraq, and that Iran’s goal in aiding the Houthis is not aiding Yemen but hurting Saudi Arabia.

    Iran is gaining military dominance in Yemen in the same way that it did in Iraq, which makes it easy to see why the Houthis blocked a 2016 peace deal and why Iran is interfering in Iraq’s upcoming elections.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:50 pm on 25 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Hamas, , , , ,   

    “Axis of Resistance” Encompasses Iran, Hezbollah, Syria, and Hamas 

    INU – When President George W. Bush gave his 2002 State of the Union address, he used the now-famous term, ”Axis of Evil” that warning against the development of weapons of mass destruction by the countries of North Korea, Iran and Iraq.

    In 2010, the term “Axis of Resistance” was adopted to encompass the forces of Iran, Hezbollah, Bashar Assad’s Syria, and Hamas.

    After the February 10th downing of an Iranian drone, and the loss of an Israeli F-16 following Israeli strikes against Syria, the media mentioned the “Axis of Resistance” phrase, but did not discuss its meaning or motivation in depth.

    In an article for the US News and World Report by Lamont Colucci, associate professor of politics and government at Ripon College, and senior fellow in National Security Affairs for the American Foreign Policy Council, writes, “Iran has mobilized its own forces, its proxies and Syrian services to create a powerful network to threaten Israeli security. Iran and Syria have been instrumental in transferring greater amounts and more sophisticated weaponry to Hezbollah, utilizing the fighting in Syria as a real-world training ground for future conflicts. The world was so mono-focused on the Islamic State group and the Syrian civil war that it continued to ignore Iranian strategic moves and intentions that go well beyond an Assad victory. In fact, we may come to view the Syrian Civil War as merely phase one of an overall Iranian plan to dominate the Middle East and wage war against Israel, culminating in an attempt to blunt or even drive out the American presence from much of the region.”

    Iran would like to gain access to the Mediterranean, and the new axis could become powerful enough to intimidate American allies in the region to retract support for American foreign policy goals.

    Colucci adds, “The ‘Axis of Resistance’ poses a direct threat to the national interests of the United States and should be treated as a fundamental priority. It has no place in the international arena, and the movements and regimes that are its supporters are by definition illegitimate. In the past, the United States allowed Syria to dominate Lebanon; it now needs to decide if it is acceptable for Iran to dominate Syria, coerce Iraq and wage war against Israel.” He calls out this axis, “worshiping at the altar of tyranny, conquest and theocracy,” as “evil”.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:24 pm on 22 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Iranian Expansionism Destroying the Middle East 

    The aggressive expansionism of the Iranian Regime has caused violence and divisions across the Middle East, while their efforts to create regional proxy militias are worsening the situation in three already unstable countries: Syria, Yemen, and Iraq.

    It is well known that there are numerous Iran-backed Shiite militia groups fighting in Syria for the Assad regime, but some of these groups, like the Hashd Shaabi or Popular Mobilization Forces, are also working in Iraq to hamper peace and stability.

    In December, five Christian protesters were shot and injured by members of the Hashd al-Shaabi militia in Bartala, northern Iraq, while protesting as part of a larger group about assaults on Christians by the Shia militia.

    Captain Agathon Saleh said: “Many Christians are angry with practices of the Hashd al-Shaabi militia and consider them a continuation of violations committed by the Daesh terrorist group.”

    In Yemen, Shiite Houthi militia routinely attacks Yemeni government forces and civilians.

    Just last week, the Iran-backed Houthis kidnapped 300 people, mainly the elderly and children, in the town of Adeen. As it came so soon after the death of Houthi commander Abu Abdulrahman Al-Alwi, it is thought that this may have been retaliation.

    Yemen’s civil war began in 2014, when the Houthis took over the capital Sanaa and many other cities, forcing the internationally recognized government to flee to Saudi Arabia.

    However, it is in Syria where people have been most affected by Iran’s destabilization campaign as Iran-backed militias attack civilians and moderate opposition groups.

    Roughly 18,000 Shiite militiamen are said to fighting in Syria for the Bashar Assad regime, in a civil war that began in 2011 and many of them were recruited by the Iranian Regime or one of its proxies. This includes:

    • 10,000 Hezbollah fighters, who Iran deployed there from Lebanon

    • 5,000 fighters from Iraq’s Shiite areas, like Baghdad, Najaf, and Basra

    • 2,000 fighters from the Afghan Fatimiyun Brigade, who fight in the south of Aleppo, Damascus and Daraa

    • 500 fighters from the Pakistani Zaynabiyyun Brigades, who are fighting in the north of Aleppo

    On top of this, the Assad regime is using Iran-backed militia groups (or shabiha) to bolster its forces against the Syrian opposition. The 24,000-strong shabiha has been blamed for the killing of many anti-Assad protesters.

    The shabiha, believe to be funded by regime supporters including Assad’s cousin Rami Makhlouf, began to replace soldiers that deserted the Syrian army during the first year of the civil war, and their numbers increased dramatically as the Assad regime started losing power.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:17 pm on 16 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    How The World Views Iran’s Role In Syria 

    By Heshmat Alavi

    As protests across Iran experience a variety of ups and downs following a major surge early this year, a wide array of analysts are seen writing about this important country’s domestic and foreign developments.

    More recently, concerns for Tehran are also increasing abroad as its international isolation begins to take its toll.

    To stand alongside the Iranian people, the international community must raise the cost of Tehran’s belligerence.

    In a piece some time ago I discussed How Iran Is Losing Europe, especially taking into consideration the distancing of France from Iran and President Emmanuelle Macron’s improving relations with the United States.

    Considering the fact that Iran’s economy is in desperate need of business ties with large French firms, such developments have become increasingly concerning for the Iranian regime’s ruling elite.

    President Macron recently threatened military action against the Assad regime in Syria, widely known to be remaining in power thanks to the support of Iran and Russia.

    “France will strike” if the Syrian conflict witnesses the use of chemical weapons against civilians, being in violation of international treaties, according to Reuters.

    “On chemical weapons, I set a red line and I reaffirm that red line,” Macron added. “If we have proven evidence that chemical weapons proscribed in treaties are used, we will strike the place where they are made.”

    Last May Macron emphasized chemical weapons use would represent a “red line” crossing. Updating his position, Macron took advantage of last Friday’s telephone call with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin to weigh in grave concern over signs of chlorine bomb usage against civilians in Syria.

    In recent weeks, rescue workers and aid groups in Syria, and the U.S. government, have been accusing Damascus of repeatedly deploying chlorine gas as a chemical weapon against civilians in Ghouta and Idlib.

    This highly dangerous chemical substance, which Syria claims to possess legally for purposes such as water purification, can be lethal when used as a weapon and causes suffocation.

    The “Syrians for Truth and Justice” organization is reporting how missiles carrying poisonous gasses targeting Ghouta belonged to Iran:

    “According to Bellingcat, the munitions used in the February 1 attack are Improvised Rocket Assisted Munitions (IRAMs), based on modified Iranian 107mm rockets. The standard warhead has been replaced with a large pressurized gas cylinder, and tail fins have been added to the rocket.”

    Such developments go alongside further troubles brewing for Iran, emanating from strong remarks by other senior U.S. officials and figures.

    Daniel R. Coats, Director of National Intelligence at a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Tuesday:

    “Iran remains the most prominent state sponsor of terrorism, providing financial aid, advanced weapons and tactics, and direction to militant and terrorist groups across the Middle East and cultivating a network of operatives across the globe as a contingency to enable potential terrorist attacks.”

    In yet another reminder of Iran’s troubles regarding the controversial nuclear deal, known officially as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. John Bolton emphasized in a FOX News TV interview of only three months remaining to U.S. President Donald Trump’s deadline regarding a decision over the accord’s future.

    Promises were made Tehran would join the community of civilized nations as a result of this deal. The result, however, has been anything but.

    U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Wednesday renewed his government’s call on Iran to withdraw from Syria, accusing Tehran of destabilizing the Middle East through military presence.

    “Iran needs to withdraw its military, its militia from Syria, and allow a hope for the peace process to take hold in Geneva,” Tillerson emphasized at a news conference in Amman, the capital of Jordan.

    As argued extensively in the past, an interesting insight is now provided into how Washington can impose meaningful pressure on Tehran at a time when protesters are chanting for Iran’s regime to “Let go of Syria, think about us.”

    New York Post article reads in part:

    “Now is the time for Trump to re-establish a robust military deterrent toward Iranian expansionism in close collaboration with regional allies. His administration declared the Revolutionary Guard a terrorist entity in October, and he should target key Guards’ bases and weapons in Syria accordingly. Such an approach could help prevent a larger-scale conflict.”

    Iran understands how more money pumped abroad will flame their already crisis-riddled political status quo back home.

    Washington may particularly be focusing on also closing Iran’s “land bridge,” connecting Tehran to Damascus to easily influence the entire region and connect to the Mediterranean.

    Iran’s regime is very vulnerable following the recent uprising. Public unrest and the protesters’ demands for fundamental change are Tehran’s Achilles’ heel.

    Identifying and supporting the very element that can realize this change is crucial.

     

    via How The World Views Iran’s Role In Syria — Iran Commentary

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:45 pm on 13 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    How the Iranian Regime Is Waging a Proxy War in the Middle East 

    Slide4

    NCRI: The Iranian Regime has been merging its proxy groups across the Middle East with existing local defence forces in various countries, which become a part of that country’s army.

    This is evidenced in an April 2017 memo from the Syrian armed forces, which stated that the defense forces would replace the Iranian proxies eventually. This may lead you to believe that Iran is removing itself from the Syrian conflict, but this is simply untrue.

    They are removing their proxies to go to other places in the Middle East, but once the ideology has been spread, the local defense groups will become Iranian proxies themselves and can become far more influential if everybody thinks that the Iranian Regime is not involved.

    This tactic has been used by the Iranian Regime already in Iraq with the Popular Mobilization Forces (PMF) and Lebanon with Hezbollah, two groups that are now immensely in their respective countries and its political system. The Iranian Regime has deployed the PMF and Hezbollah to Syria and other areas of conflict and even used them to train terrorists.

    The groups are even known to work together, as a video of Qais al-Khazali, the leader of PMF affiliate Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq, at the Lebanese-Israeli border in December shows. In the video, Khazali states that he is there with Hezbollah to oppose Israel.

     

    This move doesn’t reduce the number of Iranian proxies involved in conflicts across the Middle East, but increases them. There are then more pro-Iran regional militias to help create Iran’s dream of a Shiite Crescent across the Middle East, which would make it easier to create more proxies by supporting more local defense forces.

    Through the Shiite Crescent, the Iranian proxies could spread across Europe and eventually across the world if they aren’t stopped.

    The Regime’s overall goal in creating more proxies is to export the Iranian Islamic ideology across the region and eventually the world, just as it already has done in Iraq and Lebanon.

    Iran regime's millitias

    Iran regime’s militias 

    Ahmed, a Hezbollah member, said that there are also Hezbollah factions in Syria and Iraq, which share the same ideology and regional goals.

    He said: “All of these factions in Iraq, Syria and Lebanon will fight side by side with each other in the next war.”

    That is a very worrying prospect for anyone concerned about Iranian aggression and expansionism, national sovereignty, peace in the Middle East, and extremist Islamic ideology.

    This is another reason that the Iranian Regime should not be allowed to reach its 40th anniversary in 2019

     

     

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 11:16 am on 8 Feb 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    How the Iranian Regime Is Using Its Proxy Groups and How the US Can Tackle Them 

    The Iranian Regime has a network of foreign proxy groups all across the Middle East, from large formal organizations like Hezbollah to small splinter groups like Asaib Ahl al-Haq. This means that Iranian influence is spreading further than ever before and is doing so in increasingly diverse ways. How can we stop them?

    At a Policy Forum at The Washington Institute on February 2, Hanin Ghaddar, the Institute’s Friedman Visiting Fellow and a veteran Lebanese journalist and researcher, spoke about the Iranian Regime’s control of Lebanon via Hezbollah and explained the political balance is a mere illusion in Lebanon because of Iran.

    He explained that because of Iran’s power over Hezbollah, the Regime has been able to build a land bridge across the Middle East through Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, which the mullahs will use to transport weapons, troops, and money to its terrorist proxies (including splinter groups) across the region, and expand its power even more.

    At that same forum, Phillip Smyth, a Soref Fellow at the Institute and a researcher at the University of Maryland, explained that if the US wished to tackle these Iranian-backed groups, they must recognise that they are all connected.
    Even though it may seem as if the groups are divided along religious or ethnic or political grounds, they are all reading from the Regime’s script. They are paid from the same coffers, following the same idealogy, and fightinging the same battles.

    Smyth said: “Understanding Iranian ideology will allow Washington to counter it more effectively. Iranian operatives know how to work with individuals and splinter groups, while U.S. policy tends to be more binary in determining allies and adversaries. Going forward, U.S. officials should learn how to better utilize religious networks in the region. They should also take advantage of the fact that Iran overestimates its influence in certain quarters, particularly within the Iraqi army.”

    Both speakers agreed that because of the speed that the Iranian Regime was recruiting fighters via their proxy groups, the fighters were no longer as loyal to the cause or as well trained, which was also a way to attack the Iranian Regime.

    Ghaddar said: “The United States can take several steps in response… In the short term, supporting anti-Iran and anti-Hezbollah candidates in the May elections could harden the line between the state and Hezbollah. In the longer term, Washington would be wise to draw red lines in Syria and stick to them.”

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:35 am on 24 Jan 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran Regime Is a Threat to Us All 

    Iran threat

    Houthis Terrorists supported by the Iranian regime

    NCRI – The Iranian Regime was founded on the principal of exporting their revolution- including their widely discredited interpretation of Islam- to the rest of the world. They have never given up on this idea and continue to pursue world domination through the use of nuclear weapons, ballistic missiles, and proxy militias to fight for them.

    The Iran- sponsored Houthi militia in Yemen sought to overthrow the internationally recognised government, and replace them with former president Ali Abdullah Saleh. The Houthis captured the capital of Sana’a, and the Iranian Regime rejoiced at controlling another capital in the Middle East, but faced opposition from a Saudi-coalition, which stepped up the proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia.

    Bruce Riedel, director of the Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution, stated: “Iran is gradually increasing its support for the Houthi rebels in Yemen. Rather than eliminating the Iranian presence in the country, the Saudi-led war is giving Tehran the opportunity to become more influential there than ever. The Houthis … will need Tehran’s backing more as the stalemate continues … A war designed to weaken Iran is actually helping it against its regional rival.”

    In November, the Houthis attempted to fire a ballistic missile towards Riyadh International Airport in November, which was the first missile to be aimed at such a densely-populated area.

    The Iranian-made missile was thankfully destroyed in flight by Saudi forces before it could do any damage, but it is clear that the Iranian Regime at the very least supplied the missile and quite possibly order the attack. It is believed that the missile was disassembled, smuggled into Yemen, and reassembled by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and its Lebanese-based proxy Hezbollah.

    The US considers this attack as evidence that Iran has violated two United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions on the Yemen crisis and Iran’s missile program.

    The Houthis have since followed this up another attempted missile attack on Riyadh in December, but this was once again thwarted by the Saudis. However, the Iran-backed Houthi warned that these attacks mark a new chapter, because now Saudi palaces, military bases, and oil facilities, are within missile range.

    Iran’s use of proxies is widespread in the Middle East. Iran armed Shiite militants in Bahrain as part of an effort to bring the country back under Iran’s control- despite Bahrain gaining independence nine years before the Regime took power- and in November, the militants created an explosion on a major oil pipeline in Bahrain to slow the supply of oil to Saudi Arabia.

    With the help of their proxies, Iran does not need to get their hands dirty and have widely escaped the consequences of their actions.

    When the US threatened sanctions against Iran for noncompliance with the nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA), IRGC Major General Mohammed Ali Jafari threatened to launch ballistic missiles on any US military base within 1,200 miles (the range of their ballistic missiles). Ironically, Iran’s use of ballistic missiles is one of the things that Donald Trump sees as a violation of the JCPOA.

    Following those comments, US Representative Ron DeSantis responded: “Iran’s behaviour… has only seemed to get worse. … The present course is untenable and Iran’s threatening behaviour is likely to increase in frequency.”

    In 1983, Iran attacked a US Marines barracks in Lebanon and killed 241 American service members using its terrorist proxy Hezbollah. There is no reason to suspect that they would not do so again.

    Iran also threatened France after various French politicians raised concerns about the Iranian missile program, Iranian expansionism, and called for a political dialogue on the subjects.

    IRGC Brigadier General Hossein Salami said: “If Europe wants to turn into a threat, we will increase the range of our missiles… we have no limitations for the range of our missiles in technological terms.”

    Anthony Chibarirwe wrote on The Trumpet: “These [European leaders were] exercising caution even in their efforts to preserve the JCPOA nuclear deal with Iran. But they aren’t doing so because they trust Iran or because they want it to go nuclear; they are doing so because they distrust and fear this belligerent Iran so much that they choose appeasement rather than confrontation. But their idealist school of thought will not solve the problem.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:03 pm on 27 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    VIDEO: One way to counter Iran’s aggression? Change the map of the Middle East 

    The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests

    The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests

    Fox News, Dec. 25, 2017 – Iran’s geopolitical ascent is the most significant and dangerous development in the Middle East this century. But while the Trump administration’s new National Security Strategy properly identifies Iran as among the important challenges to U.S. security interests, it doesn’t offer a concrete strategy on how to counter Iran’s growing regional power.

    President Trump should follow the example of President Reagan, who pursued an offensive strategy to undermine the Soviet Union that included supporting indigenous anti-communist insurgents around the globe. Today, America should support indigenous forces that oppose – and seek independence from – Iranian domination.
    Reversing the strategic threat posed by Iran will require a continued U.S. military presence and military aid to local forces in Syria and Iraq. It will also require greater support for our regional allies, such as Israel and Jordan, which must contain the provocative actions of Iran and its proxies. But this defensive posture will not suffice even to contain Iran, let alone transform its trajectory.
    The United States also needs to recognize Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen for what they are: failed, artificial constructs now dominated by Iran. Iran has taken advantage of ISIS’ crumbling caliphate to increasingly consolidate control over these four nations.

     

    The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests, and it’s time to upend it.

    Maintaining Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen in their existing forms is unnatural and serves Iran’s interests. There is nothing sacred about these countries’ borders, which seem to have been drawn by a drunk and blindfolded mapmaker. Indeed, in totally disregarding these borders, ISIS and Iran both have already demonstrated the anachronism and irrelevance of the borders.
    Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen are not nation-states as Americans understand them, but rather post-World War I artificial constructs, mostly created out of the ashes of the Ottoman Empire in a colossally failed experiment by international leaders.
    With their deep ethno-sectarian fissures, these four countries have either been held together by a strong authoritarian hand or suffered sectarian carnage.
    Indeed, the principal vulnerability of Iran’s regional strategy is its dependence on brutal regimes to rule lands riven by ethno-sectarian fissures. The United States should exploit this vulnerability by supporting those forces in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen that oppose Iran’s domination and seek greater self-determination or independence from their own capitals.
    The result could be transforming these failed states into loose confederations or new countries with more borders that more naturally conform along sectarian lines.
    Any redrawing of political relationships or borders is highly complex, and the United States cannot dictate the outcomes. But we can influence them. We would need to deeply examine each country for its unique qualities and histories, and consult closely our regional allies before deciding upon a policy.
    Here are some examples of policy conclusions that the U.S. government might draw:
    ·         We might cease supplying arms to Iraq and declare our support and strong military aid for an eventual Iraqi Kurdish state, once its warring factions unify and improve governance. We could support a federation for the rest of Iraq.
    ·         For Syria, we could seek a more ethnically coherent loose confederation or separate states that might balance each other – the Iranian-dominated Alawites along the coast, the Kurds in the northeast, and the Sunni Arabs in the heartland. We could also demonstrate we are not anti-Shia Muslim by improving relations with Azerbaijan, a secular Shia country bordering Iran that seeks a closer relationship with the United States.
    An added potential benefit of this approach could be a fomenting of tensions within Iran, which has sizable Kurdish and Azeri populations, thereby weakening the radical regime in Tehran.
    Some might argue this approach impractical, destabilizing and offers Iran new opportunities.
    Perhaps, but the region’s current trajectory is more dangerous. The burden is on the United States to adapt its policy to the dissolving of borders and responding to Iran’s aggression.
    Iran is not a status quo power content to consolidate its winnings; its emboldened radical regime is intended to dominate the region and destroy Israel. An Iranian-Israeli conflict looms ever closer as Iran establishes bases and missile factories in Syria, posing a second front in Israel’s north.
    In addition, Americans must concentrate on Iran’s continued development of nuclear-capable ballistic missiles that could eventually reach the U.S. homeland.
    Artificial states have been divided or loosened before with some success, such as the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia, which are all post-WWI formations. Bosnia and Herzegovina have also managed as a confederation.
    President Trump should take the offensive to Iran. The current political structure of the Middle East serves Iran’s interests, and it’s time to upend it.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:08 pm on 25 Dec 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    Mullahs’ Regime in Crises Explosive Situation in Iran & Meddling in other Countries 

     
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