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  • Masoud Dalvand 11:07 am on August 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Paris Conference,   

    Paris Conference calls to investigate #1988Massacre in #Iran 

    iranarabspring

    Call for an international commission of inquiry to investigate 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran Human rights, in particular, bringing to justice the officials involved in the 1988 massacre, should be at the core of Iran policy

    Human rights defenders, dignitaries, European politicians and the Iranian Resistance called for the formation of an international commission of inquiry into the massacre of political prisoners in Iran in the summer of 1988 and bringing those responsible for this genocide and crime against humanity to justice.

    They stressed that the issue of human rights should be at the core of the West’s policy on Iran. They urged the UN, EU and the US to put the issue of flagrant and systematic violation of human rights in Iran on top of their agenda.

    The call was made during an exhibition on the 1988 massacre that took place upon the initiative of Mr. Jean-François…

    View original post 906 more words

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 6:51 am on August 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ 

    by Siavosh Hosseini 

    The Iranian regime has increasingly focused on clamping down on anyone who speaks out against the human rights abuses of its ruling class. One of the key areas where this is demonstrated is in the trials of these individuals. Many lack basic legal representation, and the proceedings are brief. If they do have legal representation, there are often hurdles for them to meet with their lawyers and having access to court files delayed.

    Human rights lawyers who speak out against torture and unfair trials have also faced harassment, disbarment, and imprisonment. Trials of human rights defenders generally take place in a climate of fear.

    Amnesty International recently launched a global campaign ‘Brave’, calling for an end to attacks against those defending human rights worldwide.

    “It is a bitter irony that as the Iranian authorities boast about their increased engagement with the UN and the EU, particularly in the aftermath of the nuclear deal, human rights defenders who have made contact with these same institutions are being treated as criminals,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Research and Advocacy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

    “Rather than propagating the dangerous myth that human rights defenders pose a threat to national security, the Iranian authorities should focus on addressing the legitimate concerns they raise. These are people who have risked everything to build a more humane and just society – it is appalling that they are so viciously punished for their bravery.”

    Amnesty International, who released a new report entitled ‘Caught in a web of repression: Iran’s human rights defenders under attack’, is calling on the EU to speak out in the strongest terms against the persecution of human rights defenders in the country.

    “The international community, and in particular the EU, must not stay silent over the outrageous treatment of human rights defenders in Iran,” said Luther. “Instead of appeasing Iranian officials, the EU should forcefully call for the immediate and unconditional release of all those jailed for their peaceful human rights activism and for an end to the misuse of the justice system to silence activists.”

    This recent report detailed the crackdown on human rights defenders in a variety of key areas, including the death penalty, women’s rights, and trade unionists, just to name a few.

    Over the past four years, Iran’s judiciary have dropped the threshold for invoking the vague national security-related charges, while increasing the length of prison sentences for these individuals. Many of their crimes include contacting the UN and the EU, as well as international agencies focused on human rights.

    via  Iran Vilifies Human Rights Defenders as ‘Enemies of the State’ — The Media Express

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:35 am on August 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison 

    A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison

    Sufferings of mothers of PMOI martyrs

    In the name of God, in the name of freedom, knowledge and justice

    We have already spoken of the magnificent stories of those fallen for freedom. We have written many poems and songs about the most splendid epics created in the Iranian people’s quest for freedom.

    Our hearts are filled with love and faith when we hail the lofty souls of those heroes in chains and those who sealed their honesty and loyalty with ultimate sacrifice.

    I am writing for the mothers and fathers whose strength and resistance make mountains humble. I am writing to pay tribute to their humane interpretation of the word, “mother”, and to thank their abundant love which never dies down and their endurance that passes like a breeze through the stormy sky.

    I turn the pages of my memoirs, to reach the page where I first found your familiar gaze. I could see the glad tidings of life in your kind eyes as if a dandelion was passing through the experience of life with a cry for justice.

    In the noisy days when the POWs were returning home, we had decorated our neighbourhood with strings of light to celebrate the return of Reza, our next door neighbour, Mrs. Zahra’s son.

    On that same day, my mother had gone to Behesht-e Zahra (cemetery). She returned home at around noon. I remember the exact moment. My mother hugged Reza, squeezed him hard and kissed him on the cheeks, as if she was kissing her beloved son, Abdolreza, who had been executed earlier. All day long, you were deep in your own thoughts, and your eyes bespoke of the lashes of injustice.

    My eyes followed you, step by step, cuddling your tall figure. You had been through so many twists and turns, so many ups and downs, you had witnessed so much atrocity, so much injustice, and you were still standing tall.

    I can remember your words on that day. “I wish I could also celebrate the return of my loved ones; although I didn’t see even their corpses, nor did I have the permission to mourn them.”

    NCRI Women fb

    Yes, in the days when people were tossing flower petals in the streets of Iran and decorating all neighborhoods with string lights for the return of POWs, and everyone was engulfed in joy and happiness, there were also some mothers who were mourning their children and their beloved young men and women who had been executed. No one knew what was going on in the hearts of those mothers.

    The lullabies of these mothers became an anthem for freedom so that the Divine rule of God would shine on the Earth and give meaning to the world with His love and mercy.

    The children of these dear mothers and fathers who were sacrificed on the altar, turned into inspirations and symbols of sacrifice, steadfastness and courage.

    fb Marc Nelson

    My parents were only an example of many other parents who had been born human in the darkness of a land where their ancestors had been unjustly hanged by the rope of the scale of justice; they were the ones who ran like blood in the veins of the history of our homeland.

    These were the fathers and mothers who wrote the pages of victory in their own time in the silence of an everlasting love.

    Mother is the symbol of love, sacrifice and selflessness. There were mothers who sacrificed their loved ones but their love and kindness became ubiquitous, a love that could not be written on the paper.

    I would like to remember mothers who stood tall as a loud cry against everything that sought to enchain them; they wiped the dust away from their faces to identify the executioners who killed their children. The executioners could not ever conceive of such steadfastness and endurance. These mothers stood firm to expose the oppression of the mullahs’ rule all over the world and attest to the undoubtable truth.

    1. Mother Mossanna (Ferdows Mohebbat): Her three sons, Morteza, Ali and Mostafa, as well as her daughter-in-law, Nahid Rahmani, and her brother, Nasser Rahmani were executed in the 1980s. Nahid and Nasser’s bodies were thrown into Qom’s Lake because the executioners had to get rid of the large number of corpses before the visit by an ICRC delegation at the time. Mother Mossanna was in prison when she heard about the execution of her three sons. Despite the great pain and suffering, she remained proud and stood tall in the history of our country.
    2. Mother Effat Shabestari: She became paralyzed in prison due to Rheumatoid fever. Her daughters, Raf’at and Soghra Kholday, had been executed. Her son, Qassem, who had been arrested in 1980, was hanged eight years later. When she was taken to see the corpse of her son, she turned her head away and said, “I will not take back the gift I have given in the path of God…”
    3. Mother Jahan Ara: She is known in Iran as the mother of three martyrs. Her fourth martyr, Hassan Jahan Ara, has not been mentioned anywhere. Hassan was a member of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran, who was among those massacred in 1988. This mother was not allowed to say anything, anywhere, about Hassan. She had sacrificed her children for Iran’s freedom but had to remain silent and lonely to mourn for Hassan. Yet, it is her silence that is more telling than any other eloquent speech.
    4. Mother Vadood: Vadood had been martyred before the 1980s. She had looked for him everywhere. Once, she was looking for her son in a morgue, when she recognized him by his feet. She started crying out, pushing Vadood’s cold feet to her chest. When she returned to her prison cell, she told her cellmates, “I put his ice-cold feet on my heart and warmed them up.”

    This is the story of how we were united as humans to watch the rainbow in spring, to feel the pride of mountains and the glory of the sea.

    In those years, when our mothers were suffering in agony, their eyes were filled with kindness and their silence was a cry which called on the world for solidarity.

    Since then until now, I have been turning the pages of my memoirs in anticipation of this moment when the truth of the resistance of these mothers and fathers is narrated, those who did not fear the cold and dark days of oppression, and their strength overwhelms us.

    They were the ones who continued the movement for freedom and equality in Iran. They have been the hope of our nation. The philosophy of their lives and deaths, gave meaning to Iran’s history. They became beacons who show the way towards freedom and a principled life.

    Your cries will not go unanswered. Our call for justice today, is the answer to your cries. There will come a day when we can feel the warmth of the sun of love, hope and justice; a day when prison, torture, and execution will become a fable and a day when Iran will feel your presence.

    Maryam Akbari Monfared – Evin – August 2017

    Source: National Council of Resistance of Iran – Women’s Committee website:

    http://women.ncr-iran.org/articles/4181-sufferings-of-mothers-of-pmoi-martyrs

    via #Iran: A letter by political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared, from Evin Prison — iranarabspring

     
    • bluemoone 5:47 am on August 12, 2017 Permalink

      These stories are so sad they rip the heart right out of you. To be imprisoned and separated by those you love simply for voicing an opinion because you wanted to make a better world for them. Torturous.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 6:18 am on August 12, 2017 Permalink

      Yes, you’re right Danielle, unfortunately these stories there are a lot in Iran, especially you know Mullahs are misogyny, therefore, repression and torture in relation to women in Iran are more intense. Thanks for comments and thank you very much for your great and humanitarian feelings.

      Like

  • Masoud Dalvand 8:43 pm on August 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    A Look at Khomeini’s Fatwa for PMOI/MEK Massacre video & photos 

    Justice for Victims of Irans 1988 Massacre Demanded At Free Iran Rally

    Justice for Victims of Irans 1988 Massacre Demanded At Free Iran Rally

    By Jubin Katiraie

    IRAN FOCUS, 08 August 2017— 29 years ago these days, in Iran under the mullahs’ regime, the massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners, mainly members, and supporters of the Iranian opposition People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK) had engulfed all of Iran.

    Khomeini

    Khomeini’‘Death Decree’ for mass executions of Iranian political prisoners in 1988.
     
    The intensity and speed of this massacre were so severe that not only PMOI/MEK families, but all other families of prisoners sought information about their loved ones. No authorities would provide answers, however.
    The international community had turned its back on this horrible genocide, all under the pretext of Iranian regime founder Ruhollah Khomeini signing United Nations Security Council Resolution 598 ending the Iran-Iraq War. This signing was the result of Khomeini becoming terrified of his regime being toppled by the PMOI/MEK.
    Both Iran and Iraq had accepted Resolution 598 on 20 July 1988
        Both Iran and Iraq had accepted Resolution 598 on 20 July 1988
    Initially, groups opposing the PMOI/MEK, followed by the mullahs’ regime, portrayed these executions as the mullahs’ response to a massive combat operation staged by the National Liberation Army of Iran and the PMOI/MEK in the final days of July of that year.
    However, these claims were discredited shortly and other sources indicated that the massacre was carried out based on Khomeini’s inhumane and anti-Islamic fatwa against the PMOI/MEK issued far before. Khomeini and his regime have to this day considered the PMOI/MEK as the sole serious threat that remains steadfast on its non-negotiable position of “overthrowing” this regime.
     The 1988 massacre that continues to haunt Tehran
    The 1988 massacre that continues to haunt Tehran
    In a recent interview with state-TV Aparat, former Iranian intelligence minister Ali Fallahian said the order to massacre PMOI/MEK inmates in 1988 was issued previously by Khomeini.
    “In relations to the PMOI/MEK, and all groups considered ‘mohareb’ (enemy of God), their rulings are execution. He emphasized in saying don’t hesitate in this regard… they have always been sentenced to execution, before or after 1988,” he said. Based on this fatwa, over 30,000 political prisoners were hanged in less than three months.
    Last year in the PMOI/MEK convention in Paris the Iranian Resistance President-elect Maryam Rajavi launched a justice movement seeking accountability for those involved in the 1988 massacre of PMOI/MEK inmates and other political prisoners. This movement expanded throughout Iran at a rapid pace, caused major troubles for the Iranian regime and been welcomed across the globe. This movement is demanding that senior Iranian regime officials be brought to justice for their PMOI/MEK genocide.

     Justice for Victims of Iran
    Justice for Victims of Iran’s 1988 Massacre Demanded At ‘Free Iran’ Rally
    The PMOI/MEK genocide by the regime ruling Iran is the most important dossier challenging this regime after Tehran’s nuclear program controversy. This dossier has such deep roots in Iran’s society and enjoys the enormous global support that it prevented Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei from engineering the May presidential elections. He intended to have conservative cleric Ebrahim Raisi replace the incumbent Hassan Rouhani as president.
    Raisi was a member of the notorious “Death Commission” involved in the PMOI/MEK genocide back in 1988. The PMOI/MEK justice movement and revelations by the PMOI/MEK regarding Raisi’s candidacy – blessed by Khamenei – shocked the very pillars of the mullahs’ regime.
    Iranian youths across the country, previously unaware of such crimes by the mullahs’ regime, are now in defense of the PMOI/MEK demanding the mullahs admit to their crimes against humanity. This has led the United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to refer to the 1988 massacre of PMOI/MEK members and supports in this year’s annual report.
    From the very days when reports of this massacre leaked outside of Iran’s prisons, the PMOI/MEK placed a massive global effort to unveil these crimes. They published the names of a number of massacred PMOI/MEK members, along with their graves and information about members of the Death Commission in various provinces. Human rights organizations and other such bodies were provided with this data.
    Marking the anniversary of this justice movement, new measures are necessary to realize the goals set for this initiative:
    1) Inside Iran, gathering new information about massacred PMOI/MEK members, their burial sites, identifying the perpetrators and officials behind these crimes and…
    2) Abroad, further condemning the massacre of PMOI/MEK members by parliaments, political parties, human rights advocates, religious leaders and political figures to hinge political and economic relations with Iran on ending all executions and torture, launching an independent commission to investigate into the massacre of PMOI/MEK members and supporters in 1988 to have senior regime officials brought to justice for crimes against humanity and …
    Now is the time for the international community to open its eyes to the flagrant human rights violations, and specifically the massacre of PMOI/MEK members and supporters in 1988, and not permit this dossier to remain closed as it has for years.
    There is no doubt that that the solution for Middle East crises, now affecting all other countries, is through regime change in Iran. Realizing such an objective needs all of this regime’s senior figures to be tried for human rights violations and massacring PMOI members and supporters in 1988.
    This should be followed by the official recognition of the democratic alternative, the National Council of Resistance of Iran. The PMOI/MEK is the pivotal force of this coalition.
    This reminds us of how US President Donald Trump said the Iranian people are the main victims of the regime ruling Iran.

     

    *Some important issues about MEK:

    A Long Conflict between the Clerical Regime and the MEK

    The origins of the MEK date back to before the 1979 Iranian Revolution., the MEK helped to overthrow the dictatorship of Shah Reza Pahlavi, but it quickly became a bitter enemy of the emerging the religious fascism under the pretext of Islamic Republic. To this day, the MEK and NCRI describe Ruhollah Khomenei and his associates as having co-opted a popular revolution in order to empower themselves while imposing a fundamentalist view of Islam onto the people of Iran.
    Under the Islamic Republic, the MEK was quickly marginalized and affiliation with it was criminalized. Much of the organization’s leadership went to neighboring Iraq and built an exile community called Camp Ashraf, from which the MEK organized activities aimed at ousting the clerical regime and bringing the Iranian Revolution back in line with its pro-democratic origins. But the persistence of these efforts also prompted the struggling regime to crack down on extreme violence on the MEK and other opponents of theocratic rule.
    The crackdowns culminated in the massacre of political prisoners in the summer of 1988, as the Iran-Iraq War was coming to a close. Thousands of political prisoners were held in Iranian jails at that time, many of them having already served out their assigned prison sentences. And with the MEK already serving as the main voice of opposition to the regime at that time, its members and supporters naturally made up the vast majority of the population of such prisoners.
    As the result of a fatwa handed down by Khomeini, the regime convened what came to be known as the Death Commission, assigning three judges the task of briefly interviewing prisoners to determine whether they retained any sympathy for the MEK or harbored any resentment toward the existing government. Those who were deemed to have shown any sign of continued opposition were sentenced to be hanged. After a period of about three months, an estimated 30,000 people had been put to death. Many other killings of MEK members preceded and followed that incident so that today the Free Iran rally includes an annual memorial for approximately 120,000 martyrs from the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran.
     A site of a mass grave for some of the victims of the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran
     A site of a mass grave for some of the victims of the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran
    The obvious motive behind the 1988 massacre and other such killings was the destruction of the MEK. And yet it has not only survived but thrived, gaining allies to form the NCRI and acquiring the widespread support that is put on display at each year’s Free Iran rally. In the previous events, the keynote speech was delivered by Maryam Rajavi, who has been known to receive several minutes of applause from the massive crowd as she takes the stage. Her speeches provide concrete examples of the vulnerability of the clerical regime and emphasize the ever-improving prospects for the MEK to lead the way in bringing about regime change.
    The recipients of that message are diverse and they include more than just the assembled crowd of MEK members and supporters. The expectation is that the international dignitaries at each year’s event will carry the message of the MEK back to their own governments and help to encourage more policymakers to recognize the role of the Iranian Resistance in the potential creation of a free and democratic Iranian nation. It is also expected that the event will inspire millions of Iranians to plan for the eventual removal of the clerical regime. And indeed, the MEK broadcasts the event via its own satellite television network, to millions of Iranian households with illegal hookups.
      A Secret documents smuggled out of Iran, over 30,000 political prisoners as young as 13 were hanged from cranes or shot to death in groups of five or six at a time.
    A Secret document smuggled out of Iran, over 30,000 political prisoners as young as 13 were hanged from cranes or shot to death in groups of five or six at a time.
     

    MEK’s Domestic Activism and Intelligence Network

     What’s more, the MEK retains a solid base of activists inside its Iranian homeland. In the run-up to this year’s Free Iran rally, the role of those activists was particularly evident, since the event comes just a month and a half after the latest Iranian presidential elections, in which heavily stage-managed elections resulted in the supposedly moderate incumbent Hassan Rouhani securing reelection. His initial election in 2013 was embraced by some Western policymakers as a possible sign of progress inside the Islamic Republic, but aside from the 2015 nuclear agreement with six world powers, none of his progressive-sounding campaign promises have seen the light of day.
    Rouhani’s poor record has provided additional fertile ground for the message of the MEK and Maryam Rajavi. The Iranian Resistance has long argued that change from within the regime is impossible, and this was strongly reiterated against the backdrop of the presidential elections when MEK activists used graffiti, banners, and other communications to describe the sitting president as an “imposter.” Many of those same communications decried Rouhani’s leading challenger, Ebrahim Raisi, as a “murderer,” owing to his leading role in the massacre of MEK supporters in 1988.
    Members of the death commission
     Members of the death commission
    That fact helped to underscore the domestic support for the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran, insofar as many people who participated in the election said they recognized Raisi as the worst the regime had to offer, and that they were eager to prevent him from taking office. But this is not to say that voters saw Rouhani in a positive light, especially where the MEK is concerned. Under the Rouhani administration, the Justice Minister is headed by Mostafa Pourmohammadi, who also served on the Death Commission and declared as recently as last year that he was proud of himself for having carried out what he described as God’s command of death for MEK supporters.
    With this and other aspects of the Islamic Republic’s record, the MEK’s pre-election activism was mainly focused on encouraging Iranians to boycott the polls. The publicly displayed banners and posters urged a “vote for regime change,” and many of them included the likeness of Maryam Rajavi, suggesting that her return to Iran from France would signify a meaningful alternative to the hardline servants of the clerical regime who are currently the only option in any Iranian national election.
    Naturally, this direct impact on Iranian politics is the ultimate goal of MEK activism. But it performs other recognizable roles from its position in exile, not just limited to the motivational and organization role of the Free Iran rally and other, smaller gatherings. In fact, the MEK rose to particular international prominence in 2005 when it released information that had been kept secret by the Iranian regime about its nuclear program. These revelations included the locations of two secret nuclear sites: a uranium enrichment facility at Natanz and a heavy water plant at Arak, capable of producing enriched plutonium.
    As well as having a substantial impact on the status of international policy regarding the Iranian nuclear program, the revelations also highlighted the MEK’s popular support and strong network inside Iran. Although Maryam Rajavi and the rest of the leadership of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran reside outside of the country, MEK affiliates are scattered throughout Iranian society with some even holding positions within hardline government and military institutions, including the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps.
    Drawing upon the resources of that intelligence network, the MEK has continued to share crucial information with Western governments in recent years, some of it related to the nuclear program and some of it related to other matters including terrorist training, military development, and the misappropriation of financial resources. The MEK has variously pointed out that the Revolutionary Guard controls well over half of Iran’s gross domestic product, both directly and through a series of front companies and close affiliates in all manner of Iranian industries.
    In February of this year, the Washington, D.C. office of the National Council of Resistance of Iran held press conferences to detail MEK intelligence regarding the expansion of terrorist training programs being carried out across Iran by the Revolutionary Guards. The growth of these programs reportedly followed upon direct orders from Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and coincided with increased recruitment of foreign nationals to fight on Tehran’s behalf in regional conflicts including the Syrian and Yemeni civil wars.
    In the weeks following that press conference, the MEK’s parent organization also prepared documents and held other talks explaining the source of some of the Revolutionary Guards’ power and wealth. Notably, this series of revelations reflected upon trends in American policy toward the Islamic Republic of Iran. And other revelations continue to do so, even now.
    MEK Intelligence Bolstering US Policy Shifts
    Soon after taking office, and around the time the MEK identified a series of Revolutionary Guard training camps, US President Donald Trump directed the State Department to review the possibility of designating Iran’s hardline paramilitary as a foreign terrorist organization. Doing so would open the Revolutionary Guards up to dramatically increased sanctions – a strategy that the MEK prominently supports as a means of weakening the barriers to regime change within Iran.
     The tape-recording of Hossein-Ali Montazeri, Ruhollah Khomeini
    The tape-recording of Hossein-Ali Montazeri, Ruhollah Khomeini’s would-be successor, describing his objections to the systematic massacre of 30,000 political prisoners
    The recent revelations of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran have gone a long way toward illustrating both the reasons for giving this designation to the Revolutionary Guards and the potential impact of doing so. Since then, the MEK has also used its intelligence gathering to highlight the ways in which further sanctioning the Guards could result in improved regional security, regardless of the specific impact on terrorist financing.
    For example, in June the NCRI’s Washington, D.C. office held yet another press conference wherein it explained that MEK operatives had become aware of another order for escalation that had been given by Supreme Leader Khamenei, this one related to the Iranian ballistic missile program. This had also been a longstanding point of contention for the Trump administration and the rest of the US government, in light of several ballistic missile launches that have been carried out since the conclusion of nuclear negotiations, including an actual strike on eastern Syria.
    That strike was widely viewed as a threatening gesture toward the US. And the MEK has helped to clarify the extent of the threat by identifying 42 separate missile sites scattered throughout Iran, including one that was working closely with the Iranian institution that had previously been tasked with weaponizing aspects of the Iranian nuclear program.
    The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) led by Maryam Rajavi is thus going to great lengths to encourage the current trend in US policy, which is pointing to more assertiveness and possibly even to the ultimate goal of regime change. The MEK is also striving to move Europe in a similar direction, and the July 1 gathering is likely to show further progress toward that goal. This is because hundreds of American and European politicians and scholars have already declared support for the NCRI and MEK and the platform of Maryam Rajavi. The number grows every year, while the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran continues to collect intelligence that promises to clarify the need for regime change and the practicality of their strategy for achieving it.

    Source: A Look at Khomeini’s Fatwa for PMOI/MEK Massacre video & photos

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 10:49 am on August 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Political prisoner, Maryam Akbari Monfared, seeks justice over Iran’s 1988 Massacre 

    In October 2016, Iranian political prisoner Maryam Akbari Monfared took the unprecedented bold move of filing an official complaint with the Prosecutor General of Tehran over the arbitrary execution of her brother and sister during the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran. She did so on 15 October 2016 from the Women’s Ward of Tehran’s notorious Evin Prison.

    مريم اكبري منفرد

    Ms. Akbari Monfared’s 15 October 2016 complaint read in part: “My brother Abdolreza and my sister Roqieh were executed on an unknown date during the summer of 1988. They were both tried by the Revolutionary Court and sentenced to prison terms. They were deprived of their right to have a lawyer to represent them. Abdolreza was arrested when he was only 17 for selling Mojahed publication (affiliated to the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran – PMOI or MEK). He was sentenced to three years imprisonment in 1980, but the authorities refused to release him after he completed his prison term until he was finally executed in 1988.

    Just a day later, on 16 October 2016, Ms. Akbari-Monfared published an open letter stating her demands in her quest to obtain justice for her loved ones who perished during the 1988 massacre.

    On 30 October 2016, Ms. Akbari-Monfared filed a follow up complaint with the Judiciary demanding an investigation to discover the identities of the perpetrators of the 1988 massacre.

     On 3 November 2016, a group of political prisoners in Gohardasht (Rajai-Shahr) Prison in Karaj issued a statement in support of Ms. Akbari-Monfared.

    Also on 3 November 2016, Amnesty International issued an Urgent Action appeal stating that prisoner of conscience Maryam Akbari Monfared, who is serving a 15-year sentence in Tehran’s Evin Prison, is being denied access to medical treatment and is facing reprisals after filing a formal complaint that seeks an official investigation into the mass killings of political prisoners, including her siblings, in the summer of 1988.

    On 10 November 2016, Sara Jafari-Hatam, the daughter of Maryam Akbari-Monfared, wrote to the UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Iran Ms. Asma Jahangir over the plight of her imprisoned mother.

    Ms. Akbari-Monfared’s case continues to draw domestic and international attention.

    Source: Justice for Victims of 1988 Massacre in Iran (JVMI) website 

    via Political prisoner, Maryam Akbari Monfared, seeks justice over #Iran’s #1988Massacre — iranarabspring

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:13 pm on August 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    What is the status of political prisoner, Atena Daemi? 

    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Childrens Rights Activist Petition

    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Childrens Rights Activist Petition

    IRAN, 06 August 2017— The political prisoner, Atena Daemi, who has been serving time in Evin Prison, was newly framed by the warden and the head of the infirmary as ‘breaching the peace of prison’ with her hunger strike.
    Prison term for Atena Daemi, anti-death penalty activist!
    Prison term  for Atena Daemi, anti-death penalty activist!
    On Monday, July 26, the human rights activist, Atena Daemi was transferred to Branch 4 of Evin’s court from the women’s ward.
    The interrogator informed Atena Daemi that the prison’s authorities have newly filed a complaint against her. Atena Daemi was briefed by the alleged crimes of ‘breaching the peace of prison” and ‘insulting the prison guards.’
    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Children
    Demand for Immediate & Unconditional Release of Atena Daemi, an Iranian Children’s Rights Activist Petition
    The head of Evin’s infirmary was introduced as one of the plaintiffs in Atena Daemi’s case. This healthcare official expressed concern since the media had earlier reflected his attitude towards the prisoners of conscience as well as the violation of rights. He also intimidated to revenge on some of the prisoners including Atena Daemi for naming him in their letters.
    One of the notorious personnel of Evin Prison named Abbas Khani also filed a lawsuit against another prisoner, Maryam Zarghan who was on the brink of release.
    The Warden of Evin Prison is another plaintiff of Atena Daemi. According to the interrogator, Atena Daemi is accused of breaching the peace of prison with her hunger strike and sit-in protests. She committed these acts to call for the implementation of human rights and review on her case. She is also charged with insulting the prison’s authorities when they accused her of malingering following her hunger strike and her transfer to the infirmary.
     
     Atena Daemi is currently detained in women’s ward of Evin Prison. She is in her 9th months of temporary arrest and waiting for the verdict of the appeal’s court.
    In her defense, Atena Daemi requested the interrogator to allow her trusted physician to be present in the court and give testimony on her critical health condition in time of hunger strike so that they realize there was no malingering. The head of the infirmary is actually the person that should be prosecuted for the charges of depriving prisoners from medical services as well as accusing them.
    A source close to Atena Daemi confirmed the report and stated, ‘Abbas Khani visited the women’s ward of Evin Prison and told Ms. Daemi that she didn’t have any health issues, according to the medical tests. However, Atena believes that the hospital doctor has forged the medical records. The claim was made on the same day that Atena’s doctor had given her Monuril (a strong antibiotic) for her illness.
    It is noteworthy that Abbas Khani prohibited Atena’s transfer to the hospital on July 17, 2017, in retaliation, however, her transfer had been earlier confirmed by the prosecutor.’

    Source: What is the status of political prisoner, Atena Daemi?

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:03 am on August 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Those who met their appointment with Freedom 

    30,000 red roses

    On the anniversary of the 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran

    The 1988 massacre of over 30,000 political prisoners in Iran

    has been described as the worst crime against humanity since World War II. [1]

    28 years after this genocide, the Iranian regime still refuses to acknowledge the executions, or provide any information as to how many prisoners were killed.

    Based on eyewitness accounts of survivors, the massacre had been prepared for from at least a year before. The order for the massacre came from Khomeini directly in the form of a religious decree (fatwa), calling for the execution of all who remained steadfast in their support for the opposition People’s Mojahedin of Iran.[2]

    A so-called Amnesty Commission (better known among prisoners as the Death Commission) asked a simple question from every prisoner: do you still support the PMOI/MEK? Those who answered yes were executed, even if they had already finished serving their original sentence.[3] None of the victims had any new activities while in detention and many of them were 15 or 16 years of age at the time of original arrest and prosecution.

    The executions started in the last week of July, peaking on July 28 until August 14, and continuing onto autumn and even the following year in some places.

    Naturally, the vast majority of the victims were members and supporters of the PMOI/MEK, but the order extended to other groups in later stages.

    Prisoners were hanged in groups, sometimes 10 to 15 at a time, and later transported out of prison by dump trucks, and buried in unmarked mass graves. There was no mercy on anyone, even young girls and pregnant women.

    Khomeini’s haste to execute was so abhorrent many of his closest confidantes had doubts about it. Hossein Ali Montazeri, Khomeini’s heir apparent and the country’s second highest authority at the time, urged for leniency and a slowdown.[4]

    In a book of memoirs published in December 2000, Montazeri pointed out the vicious tortures practiced especially against young girls and women before execution during the 1988 massacre.

    In a famous letter to Khomeini which led to his ouster, Montazeri wrote, “If you probably insist on your decision, at least order (the three-man Death Commission) to base their rulings on unanimous vote not that of the majority. And women should also be made exceptions, especially women who have children. And finally, the execution of several thousand people in several days will backfire.”

    From this letter we can understand the role and impact of women in the prisons of those days. They were firm and resilient and inspired resistance despite knowing the fact that they would have to go through the horrifying experience rape before being hanged. But they said NO to the executioners.

    It has been reported that 80 percent of PMOI women detained in the Women’s Ward 3 of Evin Prison had been massacred by September 1988. They included Monireh Rajavi, who had two small daughters and was executed only because she was the sister of the Iranian Resistance’s Leader Massoud Rajavi. There was also Ashraf Ahmadi, a political prisoner from the Shah’s time, with four children. The victims also included a wide range of people from various professions, including PMOI’s female candidates for parliamentary elections Fatemeh Zare’ii from Shiraz, and Zohreh Ainol-Yagheen from Isfahan. Dr. Hamideh Sayyahi and Dr. Shourangiz Karimian, along with her sister, and National Volleyball Team player Forouzan Abdi were among those executed in the 1988 massacre.

    An audio clip just recently released by Montazeri’s family on his website, also reveals dreadful details about the massacre of women. The tape recording from Mr. Montazeri’s meeting with members of the Death Commission, includes an example about the execution of a 15-year-old girl who had been taken to prison only two days before to break her resistant brother but since she did not denounce her executed brother, she was executed, as well.

    The tape also includes reference to the execution of a pregnant woman in Isfahan.

    The overall picture of the 1988 massacre is totally inadequate because the massacre was extensive, carried out in prisons all across the country. In some instances, there was not any survivor. The clerical regime dealt with every information regarding the massacre as top secret, not allowing any leaks.

    So, what is known about the massacre has been extracted and pieced together from the limited number of reports by survivors and families who were called to collect the bodies of their loved ones,[5] as well as from scattered acknowledgments made by the regime’s former officials as noted in this article.

    The other side of this crime against humanity is of course, the steadfastness of a generation of prisoners who did not buckle under the threat of death and defended their identity which was akin to their nation’s freedom. They thus sealed their nation’s right to freedom of choice and thought, and turned this great crime against humanity into an epical humane epitome of human grace and grit which makes every conscientious human being humble before its magnificence.

    The Iranian Resistance has renewed its call for the international prosecution of all perpetrators of the 1988 massacre and crime against humanity in Iran, who are still in power and hold important positions of authority. They include Khamenei (then President under Khomeini), Rafsanjani (then acting Commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces), Rouhani (then assistant to the acting Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces), and members of the death commission, Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi (Minister of Justice under Hassan Rouhani), Hossein-Ali Nayyeri (head of the Supreme Disciplinary Court for Judges under Rouhani), Morteza Eshraqi (then Prosecutor), and Ebrahim Raeesi (one of the top clerics, member of the Assembly of Experts, and Khamenei’s appointed head of Astan Qods-e Razavi foundation, which is an important political and economic powerhouses funding the regime’s war efforts).

    [1] A former Intelligence Ministry deputy recorded a video clip in 2008, in which he revealed that the clerical regime had massacred some 33,700 political prisoners and buried them in mass graves. According to Reza Malek, there are between 170 to 190 mass graves across the country.

    [2] “Whoever at any stage continues to belong to the (PMOI/MEK) must be executed,” Khomeini’s fatwa read.

    [3] Khomeini assigned a three-member so-called “Amnesty Commission”, who held summary trials and actually interrogated prisoners to determine their fate.

    The questions were focused on whether the inmate continued to have any allegiances to the PMOI/MEK. If the prisoners were not willing to fully collaborate with the regime against the PMOI/MEK, it was viewed as a sign of sympathy to the organization and the sentence was immediate execution.

    [4] Montazeri was ousted and placed under house arrest until his death in 2009, for his protests against the massacre.   

    [5] A report from Shiraz indicated: “When we the rumors of the massacres spread among the public, we referred to the prison. Executioners told us, ‘What did you expect, that we serve you sweets and candies? We killed 860 people at once in one day! Now, if you hold a funeral, we will raze down your house as well.’ “

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:26 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    80 women executed in Iran under Rouhani 

     

    Reyhaneh

    Reyhaneh Jabbari was executed in order to defend herself against rape in October 2014

    According to the data collected from material published by the Iranian state-run press, human rights activists and their websites, or from private sources in touch with the Iranian Resistance, 80 of those executed during Rouhani’s tenure have been women.

    Nevertheless, the actual figures are definitely higher, as most executions in Iran are carried out secretly without anyone knowing except those who carry it out.

    Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran

    Women Executed Under Rouhani
    Released:July 28, 2017

    No. Name-Last Name-Age-Date of Execution-Place of Execution Officially Announced
    1 unnamed woman Sep. 10, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    2 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    3 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    4 unnamed woman Sep. 19, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd –
    5 Z S Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    6 N S Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    7 S H Sep. 22, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Mehr News Agency
    8 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    9 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    10 unnamed woman Sep. 25, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    11 Kobra Kabiri 48 Sep. 25, 2013 Gohardasht Prison –
    12 unnamed woman Sep. 26, 2013 Kerman prison Mehr News Agency
    13 Nastaran Safari 26 Oct. 21, 2013 Dizel Abad Prison — Kermanshah –
    14 Jazi Darvishzadeh Oct. 26, 2013 Orumieh Prison –
    15 Mitra Shahnavazi Oct. 30, 2013 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    16 unnamed woman Oct. 30, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    17 unnamed woman Oct. 30, 2013 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    18 A A Nov. 21, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Justice Department of Yazd
    19 R A Nov. 21, 2013 Central Prison — Yazd Justice Department of Yazd
    20 unnamed woman Jan. 26, 2014 Delfan Fars News Agency
    21 Farzaneh Moradie 26 Mar. 4, 2014 Isfahan Prison ISNA news agency
    22 unnamed woman May. 10, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    23 Behjat May. 10, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj –
    24 S T May. 28, 2014 Amol Fars News Agency
    25 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    26 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    27 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    28 unnamed woman Jul. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Birjand –
    29 unnamed woman Aug. 07, 2014 Central Prison — Kermanshah –
    30 unnamed woman Aug. 09, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    31 unnamed woman Aug. 23, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    32 unnamed woman Aug. 26, 2014 Shahab Prison — Kerman –
    33 unnamed woman Sep. 10, 2014 Gharchak Prison — Varamin –
    34 unnamed woman 60 Sep. 11, 2014 Central Prison — Rasht Iranian state television & radio
    35 unnamed woman Sep. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    36 unnamed woman Sep. 20, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    37 Reyhaneh Jabbari 26 Oct. 25, 2014 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj IRNA news agency
    38 Akram Hosseini 43 Dec. 02, 2014 Gharchak Prison — Varamin –
    39 Marzie Ostovari Dec. 02, 2014 Central Prison — Orumieh –
    40 F GH Dec. 10, 2014 Central Prison — Qazvin Young Journalists Club
    41 Nahid Ghiasvand Dec. 16, 2014 Orumieh Prison –
    42 unnamed woman Dec. 17, 2014 Central Prison — Tabriz –
    43 Nahid Dec. 24, 2014 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj Tabnak Website
    44 unnamed woman Dec. 27, 2014 Central Prison — Zahedan –
    45 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    46 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    47 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    48 unnamed woman Jan. 01, 2015 Bam Prison –
    49 Marzie Hossein Zehi Feb. 28, 2015 Kerman Prison –
    50 Mehrnoush Ghavvassi Mar. 07, 2015 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj –
    51 unnamed woman Mar. 07, 2015 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj –
    52 F Yousefi 48 Apr. 25, 2015 Central Prison — Rasht Justice Department of Gilan
    53 Batool A May. 13, 2015 Central Prison — Arak –
    54 Fateme Mehrabani 39 May. 30, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    55 unnamed woman May. 30, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    56 unnamed woman 32 Jun. 09, 2015 announced in the press w/o place Young Journalists Club
    57 Paridokht Molaie far 43 Jul. 29, 2015 Ghezelhesar Prison — Karaj –
    58 unnamed woman Jul. 30, 2015 Shahab Prison — Kerman –
    59 Fatemeh Hadadi 39 Aug. 10, 2015 Qarchak prison — Varamin –
    60 Fatemeh Salbehi 23 Oct. 16, 2015 Adel Abad Prison — Shiraz Salamat News — Health Ministry
    61 Hajar Safari Nov. 12, 2015 Central Prison — Tabriz –
    62 F Zanjanian Dec. 06, 2015 Central Prison — Qazvin Parsineh website
    63 Zahra Nemati Jan. 06, 2016 Central Prison — Tabriz
    64 Ameneh Rezaiian 43 Apr.14,2016 Prison of Kashmar
    65 unnamed woman Apr. 14, 2016 central prison of Birjand
    66 unnamed woman Apr. 14, 2016 central prison of Birjand
    67 Zeinab Chamani 27 Apr. 25, 2016 Sari Prison Justice Department of Sari-without mentioning the victim’s name or gender
    68 unnamed woman Jun. 02, 2016 Young Journalists Club Central Prison of Qazvin
    69 unnamed woman Jul.17,2016 Ghezel Hesar Prison — Karaj
    70 unnamed woman Aug. 25, 2016 Central Prison — Yazd State-run Iran newspaper
    71 Moluk Nouri Sep. 29, 2016 Central Prison — Orumieh .
    72 unnamed woman January 15, 2017 Central Prison — Karaj
    73 unnamed woman January 15, 2017 Central Prison — Karaj .
    74 unnamed woman March 4, 2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    75 unnamed woman March 4, 2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    76 unnamed woman May/3/2017 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj
    77 unnamed woman May/3/2017 Gohardasht Prison — Karaj
    78 Zeinab Sa’adanlou July/1/2017 Central Prison — Rasht
    79 unnamed woman 25 July/26/2017 Central Prison — Babol
    State-run Ganjineh and Shabtab News
    80 unnamed woman July 26, 2017 Central Prison — Orumieh
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:52 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    Violations of the right to life in Iran 

    Liked by 1 person

    The Media Express

    In the past few days, 28 executions have been carried out in Iranian prisons all over the country. According to Iran Human Rights organization, four prisoners were hanged on 8 July in Orumieh prison including Khalil Musavi Kousi, Kheiroddin Mashmoul, Mirhaj Abdi and Sofi Kolonakzadeh who were all convicted of drug related crimes.

    Furthermore, two prisoners each were hanged in Maragheh prison, Rajai Shahr prison, Gorgan Prison and Semnan Central prison in the past one week.

    All the prisoners have been identified who were convicted and executed on various charges including murder, rape, and drug related crimes. It was reported on July 10 that at least 11 prisoners were transferred to solitary cells for execution in Rajai Shahr prison and the death sentence for 7 of them was carried out in the courtyard on the next morning. The prisoners were identified as Mehrdad Sabie Afshar, Mohammad Shirzad, Hamid Islami, Mehdi…

    View original post 276 more words

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 4:46 pm on August 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran: Bleak future awaits young brides 

     

    41,000 children under 15 years of age get married every year in Iran.

    Social scientist and writer, Rayeheh Mozaffarian, announced these figures on the marriage of girl children in Iran and added, “37,117 girls under 15 years of age got married in 2014 with men of various ages, while 1,249 girls in this age got divorced.”

    Mozaffarian also revealed that the largest number of girls getting married under 10 years of age are in the southeastern province of Sistan and Baluchistan. Next in line are the provinces of Razavi Khorassan, East Azerbaijan, and Khuzistan for marriages of girl children between 10 and 14 years of age in 2014.

    Mozaffarian added, “Early pregnancy inflicts the greatest psychological and physical damages on married girl children… Presently, nearly 1,700 pregnant mothers less than 15 years of age are experiencing their first pregnancy.”

    She also said, “Based on research done, the largest number of mothers who die between 25 and 30 years of age belong to (the southern Iranian) Province of Hormuzgan. On the average, these women have given birth to three children up to this age. After the third delivery, they face the risk of death.” (The official IRNA news agency, July 30, 2017)

     
    • bluemoone 2:45 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      They should be in school and planning for college. Has that always been one is that a byproduct of the US meddling?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 7:18 am on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      Yes, you’re right dear Danielle, they should be in school, but unfortunately this is situation of women and girls and all of people in Iran under rule of religious dictatorship. Thanks for comment, good luck.

      Like

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:22 pm on August 2, 2017 Permalink

      Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 12:10 am on August 3, 2017 Permalink

      I know you and others are working to bring more freedom to Iran. I lend my voice to your cause. The strength of the people is always stronger than the oppressors’. I look forward to the day when circumstances change for all.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Masoud Dalvand 9:32 am on August 3, 2017 Permalink

      Many thanks Danielle, you are a great friend and a great supporter of human rights. It’s my pleasure friendship with you. Good luck.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bluemoone 7:47 am on August 4, 2017 Permalink

      Mine too

      Liked by 1 person

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