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  • Masoud Dalvand 10:47 pm on December 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Amb. Kenneth Blackwell on Iran Human Rights, Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners. 

    In a panel on December 1, 2017 at the National Press Club by the Washington Office of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI-US), human rights experts called for accountability for Iranian regime’s human rights abuses. Referring to NCRI’s newly released book, “Iran, Where Mass Murderers Rule, The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities,” former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Kenneth Blackwell, called for accountability into the 1988 massacre to “put pressure on the regime to give access so that we might shine light on the evils that were done… [to give] hope to [those] inside Iran.” Blackwell added, “our delegation at the U.N. [should] continue to be a leading voice, not only on international terrorism…by the regime, but …to bring justice to a regime … that is a threat to the basic fabric of humanity across the globe.” Former Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, Linda Chavez, referred to the role of women in the opposition. “It is no accident,” that Iran’s opposition movement “is led by a woman, Madame Maryam Rajavi. She stands as a real affront to this regime. The regime hates and fears the MEK [Mujahedin-e Khalq] because in the MEK women … are allowed to lead others. And men are willing to listen and to follow them; a major threat to a regime that wants to imprison half its people.” NCRI’s U.S. Representative, Soona Samsami said, “why the regime continues to perpetrate such atrocities and continuing? The answer is simple; it fears its population. Despite harsh crackdown, Tehran has been unable to extinguish the Iranian people’s yearning for change, freedom, and human rights.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg emphasized, “The violation of human rights has become an inconvenient truth to those who have decided that the Iran nuclear agreement is what begins and ends our engagement with Iran… We need to begin holding Iran accountable.” Former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain, Adam Ereli, said, “Many of the perpetrators of this crime are in positions of high authority and this has produced a culture of impunity that Iran’s rulers exploit to continue arresting, torturing, and murdering at will and without consequences or penalty… The only way to stop rogue regimes from using terror and murder as tools of their rule is to hold them accountable for their crimes.”

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  • Masoud Dalvand 11:05 am on December 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Large Rally in Paris,   

    Large Demonstration Against Violation of Human Rights in Iran- Paris 11 Dec. 2017 at 2 pm 

    11 Dec 2017-2pm Paris

    Join us in the great rally against violation of human rights in Iran. #NO2Rouhani

    Paris- at 14 CET – December 11, 2017

    Join us great rally in Paris 11Dec

    Large Demonstration Against Violation of Human Rights in Iran. All People of Iran Say: #No2Rouhani He is a murderer not a moderate!

    Online Campaign: 11 December 2017 – 2 pm- Paris

    11 Dec 2017-2pm Paris-2

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:59 am on December 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Congressman Tom Garrett discussing newly published Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    December 6, 2017–During a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing, Representative Tom Garrett of Virginia decried the atrocities committed by the current Iranian regime, whose creation he described as leading to “bloodshed on a scale not seen in that region for years.” Raising the recently released NCRI-US book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule, Garrett spoke on the 1988 massacre of political prisoners ordered by Ruhollah Khomeini. He emphasized that any radicalization of a religion that promotes intolerance should be vehemently opposed not only by the United States, but internationally as well.

    Representative Garrett condemning radical Islam while holding Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule.

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule is the latest book released by the NCRI-US office. It focuses on the 1988 massacre during which in a matter of months the Iranian regime systematically executed 30,000 political prisoners, mainly members of the main opposition movement, the People’s Mojahedin (MEK). The perpetrators of that massacre are currently in key positions of power in Iran, including the Justice Minister in Hassan Rouhani’s cabinet. For more information regarding the 1988 massacre, please explore the NCRI-US website which is ncrius dot org.

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:12 pm on December 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Annual Report 2017, , , , ,   

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran 

    Annual-Report-2017-500x300

    By Masoud Dalvand

    Iran’s Human Rights Monitor has issued a comprehensive annual report of the shameful human rights situation under the rule of criminal mullahs. Referring to the report of Ms. Jahangir, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Iran, explains about the lack of an independent judiciary in Iran and numerous violations of the basic rights of the Iranian people and the suppression and increase of oppression in Iran.

    In this report, the latest criminality of the Iranian regime can be seen in the deliberate neglect of the state of the earthquake in the west of the country.

    Also, with regard to the right to life for humans, the increasing number of executions and arbitrary murders in Iran has been addressed.

    The report provides good information on the situation of Iranian prisons and prisoners in general, in particular political prisoners and women imprisoned, and the intensification of suppression and the very inhuman situation of detainees.

    Another part of the report describes the retaliation against human rights activists in Iran by the mullahs regime.

    Non-human punishments and punishments, such as flogging in public and amputations, are another part of this comprehensive report.

    floggings

    Violations of freedom of expression, the press, religious minorities and ethnic minorities are another part of this annual report.

    Baha'i

    Baha’is

    The violation of the economic, social and cultural rights of the Iranian people, such as workers and child laborers, has been described by the Iranian regime in this report.

    child laborers

    Video:

    You can read this comprehensive report on the link below:

    A glance at the abysmal human rights situation in Iran

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 9:38 am on December 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Panel Calls for Accountability Against Iran Rulers for Massacre of Political Prisoners 

    NCRI US

    Washington, DC- 1 December 2017- A panel of experts was organized by the National Council of Resistance of Iran, U.S. Representative Office (NCRI-US) to discuss the situation of human rights in Iran, and U.S. policy regarding it. The panel coincided with the release of a new well-documented book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule: The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities. The event was held at the National Press Club a week ahead of Human Rights Day and highlighted the need to designate certain Iranian officials as major human rights violators subject to sanctions. The panel began with an introduction from former U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain and panel moderator, Adam Ereli. Soona Samsami, the U.S. Representative of NCRI delivered her remarks on the significance of the book, “because it is not only intended to commemorate the past, but to draw attention to the present as well as the future. [It explains that] every day, new blood from a new Iranian citizen is spilled at the hands of an inhumane, corrupt, regime… these hands, however, are the same hands today as they were thirty years ago.” Samsami continued to say “the way forward certainly involves holding the regime accountable for not only its past crimes against humanity, but its current violations as well.” Linda Chavez, former Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, who was also former U.S. Expert elected by the United Nations Human Rights Commission to the U.N. Sub-commission on the Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities drew on her experience of dealing with the Iranian opposition since decades ago when the group was providing information to the United Nations in Geneva and emphasized that there is bi-partisan consensus on the need to condemn the regime and hold the rulers accountable for their crimes. Chavez discussed the current Iranian regime’s treatment of women. “We have a society in Iran in which it would be an understatement to say half of the population are regarded as second-class citizens. Women in Iran are not even given the rights of second-class citizens… One of the reasons I think the regime hates and fears the MEK is because women are allowed to be in leadership positions.” The Honorable J. Kenneth “Ken” Blackwell, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, talked on how the Iran regime can and should be confronted. “I think, if in fact, we keep the pressure as part of the comprehensive pressure that we put on the regime, we can help bring closure to the families of the victims of the summer of blood in 1988… It is incumbent upon us as individuals, us as nation states, and as communities of nation states, to put the pressure on the regime to give access to the community so that we may shine light – individual light, collective light – on the evils that were done by the regime.” With conviction in his voice, Blackwell continued. “We want to demand that our delegation at the UN continues to be leading voice… not only on the threats to national terrorism that is perpetuated by and advanced by the regime… but we in fact want to bring justice to those human rights fighters who in fact have the experience of a brutal history… where people who were just passing out leaflets in 1988 were part of the human victims of a regime that is dark, that is anti-human rights, and that is a threat to the basic fabric of humanity across the globe.” Closing the panel was former Ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg. His words called on his own political party, the Democrats, to act on their values of freedom and equality. “If anything, we Democrats should be champions of holding Iran accountable!” Touching on the current focus of the party, he demanded that to “expand the debate about Iran. It is not merely the issue of the Iran nuclear agreement, it is its violation as a state sponsor of terror.”

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:03 pm on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Join us LIVE at our panel discussion for our newest book, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    Iran where mass murderers rule- ncri us

    Join us LIVE at our panel discussion for our newest book, Iran:

    Where Mass Murderers Rule.

    This week’s comes from the ‘s new publication, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule: The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities.

    Iran where mass murderers rule- ncri us 2

    Panelists :

    Panelists NCRI-US-2

    Click on the follow link for watching all conference:

    Iran- where mass murderers rule

     US-National Press Club- Washington D.C. Panel to Discuss Iran Dec 1 2017
     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:09 pm on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule 

    IranMassMurderers-cover

    The 1988 Massacre of 30,000 Political Prisoners and the Continuing Atrocities

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule offers a glimpse into both the past and present atrocities committed by the Iranian regime. The book, published by the National Council of Resistance of Iran U.S. Representative Office (NCRI-US), examines Iran’s bloody history of political executions perpetrated by members of the government. Most importantly, it connects the horrors of the past with those of the present day, and sheds light on the lack of awareness and justice regarding these wrongdoings.

    The most infamous of these executions occurred in 1988, when Ayatollah Khomeini issued a fatwa ordering the killing of all people associated with the main Iranian opposition group, the Mujahedin-e-Khalq (MEK). This order included political prisoners that had already served their sentences, and the victims were given “trials” that lasted only minutes before their fate was decided for them. In total, around 30,000 political prisoners, mostly MEK members and associates, were executed over a period of five months as a result of the regime’s campaign to eliminate its political opponents. Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule describes in detail these horrific events, and includes a firsthand account from a victim who managed to escape his fate. The book also provides a unique unveiling of the evidence against members of the regime that participated in the killings of 1988, and identifies guilty officials that remain in power today. In fact, this latest publication from NCRI-US catalogues statements from Iranian regime officials in which they acknowledge their participation in or fully endorse the “summer of blood.” In doing so, it effectively reveals to the world that these officials have admitted their roles as mass murderers, and yet have not been held accountable.

    Along with calling for justice in Iran for the crimes of the past, Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule details the multitude of political executions in Iran today. Iran has the world’s highest rate of executions per capita, and also remains the only country on the planet that executes juveniles. The book chronicles some of the recent political killings in Iran, and also includes the resulting outcry from important entities, such as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Amnesty International. It sheds light on the current state of human rights in Iran, presents the United Nations’ statements and findings regarding these issues, and provides informed advice on how Iran and the rest of the world should proceed on the long road to justice. Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule produces a unique perspective of the Iranian regime and the officials that constitute it, offering never-before-seen evidence regarding the government’s true human rights record and concrete policy suggestions regarding the way forward.

    Iran: Where Mass Murderers Rule, published by the National Council of Resistance of Iran-U.S. Representative Office, is currently available for purchase on Amazon.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 7:06 pm on October 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , U.N. Special Rapporteur,   

    UN Special Rapporteur Speaks on Dismal Human Rights Situation in Iran 

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran addressed the Seventy-second session of the General Assembly in New York on October 25, to discuss the dismal situation of human rights in Iran that has been prevalent since the Regime took over in 1979.

    Asma Jahangir, who was addressing the General Assembly for the first time since taking the role in November 2016, delivered a report on the first six months of 2017 which was based on sources both inside and outside of Iran.

    Executions

    Jahangir explained that she was worried about the rate of executions in Iran, as well she should be. Currently, Iran has the highest execution rate per capita and is one of the few countries to still execute juvenile offenders, in clear violation of the UN’s Rights of the Child charter.

    She said: “I am concerned by the rate of executions in Iran. Reports indicate that since the beginning of the year 435 persons have been executed…At least four juvenile offenders were executed, and 86 more are known to be on death row, although the actual figure may be higher. I take the opportunity to reiterate my request for a list of all juvenile offenders on death row and reiterate my appeal to the Iranian authorities to urgently abolish the sentencing of children to death, and to engage in a comprehensive process of commutation of all death sentences issued against children, in line with juvenile justice standards.”

    Jahangir also expressed concern about the death sentence levied against spiritual leader Mohammad Ali Taheri for so-called corruption on earth- an exceptionally vague charge which the mullahs use when you haven’t actually committed a crime but they want to punish you anyway.

    Taheri’s trial is believed to have violated several international standards including due process and coercion of witnesses. As such, Jahangir called for his conviction to be overturned.

    She said: “I call for the immediate withdrawal of charges against Mr. Taheri and for his unconditional release, and the withdrawal of charges against all individuals held for peaceful exercise of freedom of expression, religion, or belief.”

    Cruel and Unusual Punishment

    Jahangir also raised the worrying issue of torture, corporal punishment, and the denial of medical care to coerce confessions and punish people, which violates human rights law and international standards of justice.

    She said: “I regretfully note that amputation, blinding, flogging, and the continued use of prolonged solitary confinement continues to be regularly practised. I am also deeply concerned by consistent reports of the denial of access to proper and necessary medical treatment of detainees, including the deprival of medical care as a form of punishment.”

    Many political prisoners have gone on hunger strikes to protest the dismal conditions they are being kept in and the Regime refuses to allow them access to sorely needed medical care.

    Prisoners of conscience

    While on the topic of political prisoners, it is important to discuss the routine detention of human rights defenders, journalists, religious minorities, ethnic minorities, and political campaigners for freedom of expression and peaceful activism.

    As of June 2017, no less than 26 journalists/bloggers had been arrested and/or sentenced for exercising press freedom. Many more had been harassed and/or intimidated by the Regime through interrogation, surveillance, amongst other things.

    Jahangir even spoke to those working at the BBC Persian Service who had been harassed by the Regime and told that if they continued working their relatives would be targeted and their assets would be frozen.

    She said: “They all sought private meetings for fear of the consequence of being identified as having provided information to my mandate.”

    Another worrying trend is that of the imprisonment of dual nationals, like UK charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who have been accused of spying for Western countries and sentenced to many years in jail.

    The 1988 Massacre

    This persecution of ordinary Iranians based on their political beliefs is not a recent phenomenon but is well ingrained in the Iranian Regime’s DNA.

    In 1988, the Regime slaughtered over 30,000 political prisoners in just a couple of months. They buried their bodies in mass graves, refused to tell the families what had happened, and attempted to hide their “crime against humanity” from the rest of the world.

    Despite recent acknowledgements of the genocide from the highest-ranking members of the Regime, the international community has still been largely silent and this silence must end.

    Jahangir said: “The families of the victims have a right to remedy, reparation, and the right to know about the truth of these events and the fate of the victims without risking reprisal. I therefore reiterate my call upon the Government to ensure that a thorough and independent investigation into these events is carried out.”

    Rights of Women

    As you can imagine, women in Iran are routinely oppressed by the Iranian Regime, whether its mandatory dress codes, banning women from attending sports matches, arresting people from reading and sharing feminist literature, excluding women from certain occupations, or many more misogynistic things.

    Jahangir said: “I call upon the Government to address these concerns in practice, and in legislation through ratifying the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and to repeal all laws and policies that discriminate against women and girls.”

    Jahangir paid tribute to the many human rights defenders who have risked their lives to speak to her about the situation in Iran.

    She said: “I have received ongoing and consistent reports of harassment, intimidation, and prosecutions of human rights defenders. For example, the well respected human rights defender, Narges Mohammadi, continues to be imprisoned simply because of her commitment to human rights. I am also deeply concerned by the reports of attacks on women human rights defenders in the form of judicial harassment, detention, and smear campaigns.”

    Even those living outside Iran fear reprisals from the Regime’s many terrorist proxy groups or that their family will be targeted by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

    What’s next for Iran?

    Jahangir expressed hope that the situation would improve through diplomatic action, but this does not seem likely.

    Iran regime’s President Hassan Rouhani made various promises during his campaign, which echoed promises that he made and did not follow through on after taking office in 2013. This so-called moderate has seen over 3,000 people executed during his four-year term and continues to see the Iranian people suppressed at the hands of the Regime.

    The only way to achieve human rights in Iran is through regime change by and for the people of Iran.

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 5:51 pm on October 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
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    Remembering Reyhaneh on the anniversary of her flight 

    October 25 marks the anniversary of the hanging execution of Reyhaneh Jabbari in 2014.

    Reyhaneh Jabbari walked to the gallows at dawn on Saturday, October 25, 2014, after seven years of incarceration.

    Since then, Reyhaneh stands as the symbol of Iran’s defenseless women who are handed the death penalty without deserving it. At the same time, she has become an icon for brave women who do not succumb to the Iranian regime and its demands.

    She was 26 at the time of execution. An interior designer by profession, she had defended herself against rape by a high official of the Intelligence Ministry (MOIS), Morteza Sarbandi.

    Reyhaneh was viciously tortured to make false “confessions” which would whitewash the methods and image of the Ministry of Intelligence but she did not give in. Instead, she wrote about the incident and about many women in the clerical regime’s jails whose only crime was being poor.

    She cried for and wrote about the victims of the clerical regime’s misogynous laws and for the young women who did not have any support in society and were victims of oppression and violence.

    Let us remember on this day, this young courageous woman, Reyhaneh Jabbari, who resisted for seven years at the cost of her life to uphold her dignity and humanitarian values.

    She remains an idol for young Iranian women and men who oppose the regime’s injustices and yearn freedom. In her name, and in the name of all the innocent victims of the clerical regime, the people of Iran call for justice.

     

     

     
  • Masoud Dalvand 8:04 pm on October 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Norway,   

    Maryam Rajavi’s Message: To the Demonstration of Iranians in Oslo – Norway 

     

    NCRI Staff

    NCRI – Maryam Rajavi: The demonstrations of Iranians abroad echo the voice of prisoners’ strikes and protests of workers, teachers and those plundered

    October 7, 2017. On the eve of the ‘World Day Against the Death Penalty,’ and in support of the Call for Justice Campaign, Iranians in Norway staged a demonstration In Oslo, the capital of Norway, Mrs. Maryam Rajavi the president elect of the Iranian resistance sent a message to this demonstration as follows:

    Fellow Iranians residing in Norway!

    Honorable personalities supporting the Iranian Resistance, and the dignified human beings who find defense of human rights, freedom and democracy in Iran as the requisite for ending war and terrorism in the Middle East. I hail all of you.

    I appreciate your demonstration in Oslo and your efforts to expand the campaign calling for justice for the victims of the 1988 massacre and the international campaign to confront violations of human rights in Iran.

    Your gathering is in line with the hunger strikes of political prisoners, the marches and protests of workers, teachers, students and those whose deposits have been plundered and complements them. All these activities have a single message and that is persistence on the desire of the people of Iran to overthrow the Velayat-e Faqih dictatorship.

    The incidents of the past year clearly prove that the efforts to mobilize our compatriots and to attract world attention to the clerical regime’s crimes have a great impact. After years, the issue of the massacre of political prisoners in 1988 has been brought up in an official document of the UN Human Rights Council.

    This is a great achievement and an important step, but it is not enough. The United Nations must set up a committee to investigate the 1988 massacre. The masterminds and perpetrators of this massacre, the executions in the 1980s and other crimes against the people of Iran must face justice.

    I also urge all parliaments to officially designate the 1988 massacre as a crime against humanity.
    Seeking justice for the victims of the massacre in 1988 is an important part of the struggle against violations of human rights in Iran which still continues in the form of daily executions, amputation of hands, and widespread arrests taking place every day to preserve the rule of repression. At least 3200 people have been executed under Rouhani. Another 5000 prisoners are on the death row.

    The regime relies on violations of human rights in Iran and suppression of protesters and freedom lovers to carry on with its belligerence and terrorism in the Middle East. If the regime had not been backed by the appeasement of Western governments, it would not have had a free hand in violating human rights. It would have not been able to extend its crimes to other countries, and it would have not been able to drench Syria in a whirlpool of blood.

    Therefore, I warn Western companies and governments, and particularly Norway, against dealing with the religious dictatorship ruling Iran.

    I hope that our fellow compatriots and Iranian freedom lovers in Norway could with their extensive campaigns attract the attention of the government and companies of Norway to the fact that any dealing and commercial engagement with the Iranian regime assists the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and reinforces its suppression of the people of Iran and belligerence in the Middle East.

    Iran’s ruling mullahs are at war with the people of Iran and the region. We urge Western governments to refrain from aiding the regime in this war through their deals. We urge them to make every engagement with the Iranian regime contingent on end to torture and executions.

    Dear compatriots, I would like to once again appreciate your efforts.
    Your campaign conveys the voice of the oppressed people of Iran to the world. This campaign has more impact today than any other time and is an important help to the Iranian Resistance for the overthrow of the clerical regime and establishment of freedom and democracy in Iran.

    I wish you every success.

     
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